Latest

Energy

Rise In Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Should Not Be a Surprise

Rise In Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Should Not Be a Surprise

Fossil fuel CO2 emissions have noticeably flattened over the past three years, while atmospheric CO2 concentration has continued upward.
Carbon dioxide emissions are estimates rather than facts, however, the bigger issue is that fossil fuel emissions are not the only anthropogenic sources of CO2.
The graph below shows that when land use is added, emissions steadily increase.
Other factors Other factors which may contribute to the discrepancy between fossil fuel emissions and CO2 concentration include: El Niño Saturation of carbon sinks Uncertainty in emissions estimates Other feedbacks El Niño El Niño, a warming of the Pacific area, is known to increase atmospheric CO2.
Saturation is not seen in the trend of Global Carbon Project estimates, which show continued increases in the amount of carbon dioxide absorbed by land and ocean sinks.
Uncertainty in emissions estimates There is a fair amount of guesswork in reported emissions and sinks.
The Global Carbon Project reports ±5% (1.8 billion metric tons) error in the fossil fuels estimate at 68% confidence based on “statistical analysis of the underlying data and expert judgement.” This is nearly equal to the observed decrease in fossil fuel emissions growth since 2013.
Land use changes, ocean sinks and land sinks have similar magnitudes of error.
These may be significant in the longer term, however, the factors already discussed are likely the drivers in the short run.
He has 35 years’ experience in the industry.

Energy

Woodside Sees Qatar Targeting New LNG Buyers With Supply Surge

Woodside Sees Qatar Targeting New LNG Buyers With Supply Surge

Woodside Sees Qatar Targeting New LNG Buyers With Supply Surge.
(Bloomberg) — Woodside Petroleum Ltd., Australia’s largest liquefied natural gas producer, expects rival Qatar to target the emerging markets of India and Pakistan with a new wave of supply next decade and not cannibalize traditional Asian buyers.
The Gulf nation plans to boost annual LNG production to 100 million metric tons by 2024 from 77 million tons now, Saad Sherida Al Kaabi, chief executive officer of state-owned Qatar Petroleum, said in June.
Woodside expects a supply gap to develop mid-next decade and that presents an opportunity.
“The Qataris are talking about 23 million tons a year but China and Pakistan have grown by that amount this year alone,” Coleman said in a phone interview.
Sanford C. Bernstein said in May more than two-thirds of LNG projects chasing to fill an expected supply gap in the mid-2020s are unlikely to be built.
The result was buoyed by a 6 percent fall in production costs to $4.90 per barrel of oil equivalent.
Woodside, which operates the Pluto and North West Shelf liquefied natural gas projects in Western Australia, reported last month its first-half output had declined to 42.2 million barrels of oil equivalent on revenue of $1.76 billion.
The two companies may also team up on the Woodside-operated North West Shelf plant where Chevron could be offered a tolling opportunity for its equity gas, Macquarie Group Ltd. said on June 30.
Shares in the company rose 2.6 percent, the biggest gain since December, to A$29.90 at the close in Sydney on Wednesday.

Conservation & Sustainability

The European Union is considering an electric car mandate.

The European Union is considering an electric car mandate.

The European Union is considering an electric car mandate.. Will they or won’t they?
After the United Kingdom and France joined the Netherlands and Norway in putting an end date on the sales of fossil fuel–powered cars, the E.U.
may set wide-reaching requirements for electric vehicles.
Per reports from Climate Home, the E.U.
governing body is mulling an electric and hybrid car quota for automakers by 2030.
The most recent report suggests a proposal is likely.
“They have made it very clear that it is their intention to go to a zero-emissions mandate,” an unnamed source with knowledge of internal E.U.
talks told Climate Home.
“The car industry has been told to stop complaining about it and start being constructive.” Policy aside, recent economic forecasts suggest that electric vehicles may account for more than half of global car sales by 2040.
Several European companies, including Volvo, are taking the hint.

Conservation & Sustainability

Trump revoked an Obama rule that protected against flooding

Trump revoked an Obama rule that protected against flooding

Last summer, just weeks after being crowned the Republican Party’s presidential nominee, Donald Trump scored major political points by visiting flood-ravaged southern Louisiana.
The flooding was America’s worst natural disaster since Hurricane Sandy, and yet, President Barack Obama had not yet interrupted his vacation to tour the damage.
First reported by E&E News, Trump’s order undoes an Obama-era executive order that required new public infrastructure projects — like subsidized housing, hospitals, and fire departments — to be built a few feet above the so-called “100-year floodplain,” or the height at which there is a 1 percent chance you’ll experience an enormous flooding event.
The requirement accounts for future sea-level rise predicted by “the best-available and actionable science,” the order reads.
That’s because sea levels are undeniably rising.
But Trump is on a mission to undo as many of Obama’s policies as possible, no matter now reasonable they were.
But speedily built projects are worthless if they become damaged beyond repair in just a few years.
Last year, he applied for a permit to build a sea wall to prevent erosion at his oceanfront golf resort in Ireland.
And The Hill reported that “Trump’s oceanfront condos in Miami and his Doral golf course would also be threatened, according to projections by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the South Florida Regional Climate Change Compact.” And yet, Trump has made clear that he thinks climate change is a “hoax.” That’s why Democratic Representative Earl Blumenauer in June introduced a bill, “The Prohibiting Aid for Recipients Ignoring Science (PARIS) Act,” to block the president’s properties from federally subsidized flood insurance.
When Trump visited Louisiana last year, he said, “I came here to help.” But now he’s showing little concern not only for future flood victims, but the taxpayers who will have to cover the damage to public infrastructure wrought by rising seas.

Conservation & Sustainability

Conservation beyond fences

Conservation beyond fences

Editor’s note:Conservation International is publishing stories from a new feature series, “South Africa side by side with nature.” In the series, we explore two South African landscapes where doing right by nature and doing right by people are the same.
The continent of Africa has more children and teenagers than anyone else.
With a median age of under 20 years old, it is the world’s youngest continent — and its fastest growing.
Even as population growth in India, Southeast Asia and the Americas is expected to level off in coming decades, Africa is projected to double its residents by 2050.
For Sarah Frazee, chief executive officer of Conservation South Africa, finding conservation solutions that can mesh with urgent development needs means going outside the traditional toolbox of protected areas and use restrictions.
“The challenges of population growth and their need for natural resources will place huge pressure on areas currently set aside for nature and wilderness,” Frazee said.
“Finding ways to restore and maintain healthy ecosystems where people currently live — cities, farms, communities adjacent to protected areas — will be crucial for the future of both people and nature.” Outside Kruger National Park, where many residents have never visited the wildlife reserves that abut their land, that means restoring a lost connection to nature, starting with the youngest generation.
Want to read more stories like this?
Sign up for email updates here.
Donate to Conservation International here.

Energy

Oil Producers Signal Offshore Return In Latest Gulf Of Mexico Auction

Oil Producers Signal Offshore Return In Latest Gulf Of Mexico Auction

HOUSTON, Aug 16 (Reuters) – Major oil producers pushed up high bids at a Gulf of Mexico offshore auction to $121 million on Wednesday, a nearly seven-fold increase from a year ago, as their return to deep water exploration gained momentum.
Winners will be announced after a 90-day review.
Some producers have signaled that they expect Gulf of Mexico projects to become more profitable now that they have trimmed operations to adapt to low oil prices.
Chevron Corp followed with 15 high bids totaling $27.9 million.
Exxon Mobil Corp took seven blocks of land for $20.4 million.
The auction drew interest from 27 oil companies, with 99 bids on 90 blocks in the Gulf of Mexico, according to the BOEM. “The deepwater industry is emphasizing short-cycle, low-risk prospects above high-impact, wildcat drilling,” said William Turner, a senior analyst at consultancy Wood Mackenzie.
The auction offered 14,177 blocks totaling 75.9 million acres, but only 508,000 received bids, according to the BOEM.
Many parts of the Gulf of Mexico need oil above $50 a barrel for producers to cover costs, with the deepest parts of the Gulf requiring around $65 a barrel to break-even, according to Wood Mackenize.
(Reporting by Liz Hampton; Editing by Gary McWilliams and Richard Chang)

Healthy Living

University Recycling 101: How College Students Go Green

University Recycling 101: How College Students Go Green

Universities are buzzing with young adults passionate about protecting the planet, and student environmental organizations direct all that energy into action.
Student projects promoting sustainability are usually quite effective because they’re fueled by young adults who are enthusiastic, persistent and innovative, according to Talia Haller, director and founder the Green Greek Representative Program at the University of Washington in Seattle.
It poises us for success in a lot of ways.” Green Greeks The Green Greek Program is a network of representatives from sororities and fraternities at UW who devise and implement planet-friendly practices in their houses.
A Green Greek project at a UW fraternity, for example, involved equipping the house with several strategically placed recycling and composting bins, and switching to products that support the effort, such as disposable utensils that are composted instead of tossed into the trash.
Sustainable Farming Students at various universities, including Washington University in St. Louis, run their own farms, often with an emphasis on organic fruits and vegetables.
In addition to offering tours of the garden, students from Burning Kumquat set up a folding table on campus and sell lettuce and other freshly picked fruits and vegetables.
“I think it’s good for people to understand what they eat and what’s needed to produce the food,” Pomerantz says.
Burning Kumquat’s environmental focus also includes such activities as screening films and leading a bike tour of local urban farms.
Arendt is an informal advisor to the recycling effort, which his institute launched as part of a student internship program.
The students package the plastic into bales, which are sold to a firm that incorporates recycled wood and recycled plastic film into decking material.

Alternative Energy

World’s Largest Solar Thermal Power Plant Approved for Australia

World’s Largest Solar Thermal Power Plant Approved for Australia

World’s Largest Solar Thermal Power Plant Approved for Australia.
The South Australian state government has approved the construction of a 150-megawatt solar thermal power plant.
It will be the largest such facility in the world once built.
California-based SolarReserve was awarded with the contract.
The company is also behind the 110-megawatt Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Plant in Nevada, the world’s first utility-scale solar thermal power plant.
A major advantage to this type of power plant is how it can store up to eight hours of molten salt thermal energy storage, allowing for power usage when needed. “The significance of solar thermal generation lies in its ability to provide energy virtually on demand through the use of thermal energy storage to store heat for running the power turbines,” said sustainable energy engineering professor Wasim Saman, from the University of South Australia.
This technology is critical for South Australia, which has been plagued by blackouts.
Australia itself also has a major gas shortage is looming and its decades-old coal plants are shutting down, sparking potential price hikes and putting energy security at risk.
The state government also recently approved the construction of the world’s largest battery farm in the Riverland region with help from Tesla.

advertisement click here for rates

LATEST FROMConservation & Sustainability

Conservation & Sustainability

The European Union is considering an electric car mandate.

The European Union is considering an electric car mandate.

The European Union is considering an electric car mandate.. Will they or won’t they?
After the United Kingdom and France joined the Netherlands and Norway in putting an end date on the sales of fossil fuel–powered cars, the E.U.
may set wide-reaching requirements for electric vehicles.
Per reports from Climate Home, the E.U.
governing body is mulling an electric and hybrid car quota for automakers by 2030.
The most recent report suggests a proposal is likely.
“They have made it very clear that it is their intention to go to a zero-emissions mandate,” an unnamed source with knowledge of internal E.U.
talks told Climate Home.
“The car industry has been told to stop complaining about it and start being constructive.” Policy aside, recent economic forecasts suggest that electric vehicles may account for more than half of global car sales by 2040.
Several European companies, including Volvo, are taking the hint.

Conservation & Sustainability

Trump revoked an Obama rule that protected against flooding

Trump revoked an Obama rule that protected against flooding

Last summer, just weeks after being crowned the Republican Party’s presidential nominee, Donald Trump scored major political points by visiting flood-ravaged southern Louisiana.
The flooding was America’s worst natural disaster since Hurricane Sandy, and yet, President Barack Obama had not yet interrupted his vacation to tour the damage.
First reported by E&E News, Trump’s order undoes an Obama-era executive order that required new public infrastructure projects — like subsidized housing, hospitals, and fire departments — to be built a few feet above the so-called “100-year floodplain,” or the height at which there is a 1 percent chance you’ll experience an enormous flooding event.
The requirement accounts for future sea-level rise predicted by “the best-available and actionable science,” the order reads.
That’s because sea levels are undeniably rising.
But Trump is on a mission to undo as many of Obama’s policies as possible, no matter now reasonable they were.
But speedily built projects are worthless if they become damaged beyond repair in just a few years.
Last year, he applied for a permit to build a sea wall to prevent erosion at his oceanfront golf resort in Ireland.
And The Hill reported that “Trump’s oceanfront condos in Miami and his Doral golf course would also be threatened, according to projections by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the South Florida Regional Climate Change Compact.” And yet, Trump has made clear that he thinks climate change is a “hoax.” That’s why Democratic Representative Earl Blumenauer in June introduced a bill, “The Prohibiting Aid for Recipients Ignoring Science (PARIS) Act,” to block the president’s properties from federally subsidized flood insurance.
When Trump visited Louisiana last year, he said, “I came here to help.” But now he’s showing little concern not only for future flood victims, but the taxpayers who will have to cover the damage to public infrastructure wrought by rising seas.

Conservation & Sustainability

Conservation beyond fences

Conservation beyond fences

Editor’s note:Conservation International is publishing stories from a new feature series, “South Africa side by side with nature.” In the series, we explore two South African landscapes where doing right by nature and doing right by people are the same.
The continent of Africa has more children and teenagers than anyone else.
With a median age of under 20 years old, it is the world’s youngest continent — and its fastest growing.
Even as population growth in India, Southeast Asia and the Americas is expected to level off in coming decades, Africa is projected to double its residents by 2050.
For Sarah Frazee, chief executive officer of Conservation South Africa, finding conservation solutions that can mesh with urgent development needs means going outside the traditional toolbox of protected areas and use restrictions.
“The challenges of population growth and their need for natural resources will place huge pressure on areas currently set aside for nature and wilderness,” Frazee said.
“Finding ways to restore and maintain healthy ecosystems where people currently live — cities, farms, communities adjacent to protected areas — will be crucial for the future of both people and nature.” Outside Kruger National Park, where many residents have never visited the wildlife reserves that abut their land, that means restoring a lost connection to nature, starting with the youngest generation.
Want to read more stories like this?
Sign up for email updates here.
Donate to Conservation International here.

Conservation & Sustainability

Fish Tales: Sourcing Recreational Fisheries Data from Newspaper Records

Fish Tales: Sourcing Recreational Fisheries Data from Newspaper Records

Fish Tales: Sourcing Recreational Fisheries Data from Newspaper Records.
In Australia, scientists working with The Nature Conservancy successfully used historical newspaper records to gather data on recreational fishing in Australia’s Noosa Estuary, revealing declines in the fishery over time.
“Noosa has always been a popular fishing area, but beyond anecdotes, we didn’t know much about the estuary’s ecological history.” From The Weekend Fishing Report to Ecological Data To help fill the data gap, the Conservancy partnered with Thurstan for help assessing historical fish populations.
The first group were just casual fishers, both Noosa locals and tourists, while the second group were highly skilled fishers with significant experience and local knowledge.
“For the less skilled population, there was a quite sharp decline over time in the returns of the fish, or number of fish caught per trip,” says Thurstan.
But within the skilled fisher group, particularly fishing competition winners, there was no such decline.
Her data shows the changing experiences of recreational fishers, and not precise measures of fish stocks.
Thurstan’s results also reveal an under-recognized nuance in fisheries conservation.
Both conservationists and scientists tend to split fisheries stakeholders into two groups — commercial and recreational fishermen — but they rarely consider fisher skill level when soliciting anecdotal data or crafting conservation messages.
Fittingly, the unique source of this historical data makes it easier to engage with local fishers, because tourists and locals alike read versions of the very fishing reports that Thurstan used as data.

Conservation & Sustainability

Trump wants to ignore the effects of climate change when permitting infrastructure projects.

Trump wants to ignore the effects of climate change when permitting infrastructure projects.

Trump wants to ignore the effects of climate change when permitting infrastructure projects.. President Trump signed an executive order Tuesday that he said will streamline the environmental review required to get large public construction efforts — like roads, bridges, and buildings — off the ground.
From the gilded lobby of Trump Tower, the president proclaimed that the executive order would repair our “badly broken” process for garnering permits for infrastructure projects.
The policy sets a goal of two years for finishing a permitting process and assigns a lead government agency to helm each approval.
The order also rescinds an Obama-era requirement that government-funded buildings take into account likely sea-level rise in design and construction.
(States and other local agencies, however, will still be able to establish stricter permitting practices.)
Updating America’s “crumbling infrastructure” became a central tenet of Trump’s presidential campaign — and he promised billions to the effort.
Trump called the current permitting process a “massive, self-inflicted wound on our country.” “It’s disgraceful,” the president said.
The White House argues the order will bring “accountability and discipline” back to the permitting process.
But many environmentalists decry it as an obvious attempt to skirt environmental rules — and cite it as further evidence of Trump’s anti-climate change agenda.

Conservation & Sustainability

Meet July, the hottest month yet

Meet July, the hottest month yet

Meet July, the hottest month yet.
The news that July was the hottest month on record comes as a relative surprise, because there hasn’t even been an El Niño this year — the natural climate shift that usually boosts global temperatures.
That’s shocking, as well as compelling evidence that anthropogenic climate change is picking up speed.
Using measurements collected from about 6,300 land- and ocean-based weather stations around the world, NASA scientists calculated that the planet’s average temperature during July was about 2.25 degrees C (4.05 degrees F) warmer than the long-term annual average.
July and August of 2016 had a bit of extra help from an El Niño, and last month achieved the mark all on its own.
Such a warm month during the peak of the Northern Hemisphere’s summer created a cascade of extreme weather conditions.
In western Canada, the worst forest fires in nearly 60 years have already torched upwards of a million acres, more than four times what normally burns in an entire wildfire season.
In California, Death Valley recorded the hottest month ever measured anywhere on Earth, with an average temperature of 107.24 degrees F. Several days topped 120 degrees.
In Alaska, some cities recorded their warmest month in history, in part because of the early retreat of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean.
At the start of the month, the volume of sea ice across the Arctic was the lowest ever measured.

LATEST FROMClimate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change & Global Warming

He’s Baaaaaaaccckkk! (Oy)

He’s Baaaaaaaccckkk! (Oy)

He’s Baaaaaaaccckkk!
(Oy).
Pen Hadow, of the 2009 Caitlin Arctic Expedition is on the loose again!
Here’s the link to the BBC story which is mostly a short video.
Here is a quote: British explorer Pen Hadow and his crew have set sail from Alaska, in an attempt to become the first people ever to sail to the North Pole.
Can the Catlin Arctic Survey Team Cover 683 km in the Next 21 Days?
Quote of the week #4 Catlin Arctic Ice Survey first report offers no original drilling data, but anecdotally confirms satellite measurement Catlin Arctic Ice Survey: paid advertising of results before they are even off the ice!
The Guardian Relocates The North Pole By 500km The Top Ten Reasons why I think Catlin Arctic Ice Survey data can’t be trusted From Eurkealert Public Release: 1-Aug-2017 FSU research: Chemical weathering could alleviate some climate change effects Florida State University TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — There could be some good news on the horizon as scientists try to understand the effects and processes related to climate change.
31st 2017 9:10 am PT @technacity While clean energy is not a new area for Alphabet’s X, the moonshot division has previously only focused on energy creation.
Holden closure will help Energy Market Operator manage SA’s blackout risk, report finds By political reporter Nick Harmsen Part of the soon-to-be vacated… Guest essay by Eric Worrall Building an energy producing nuclear fusion reactor remains elusive, but some companies are re-considering an old idea – combining nuclear fusion with nuclear fission in a single reactor, to overcome the disadvantages of both.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Green Web Hosting: How does it work and what are the benefits?

Green Web Hosting: How does it work and what are the benefits?

Green Web Hosting: How does it work and what are the benefits?.
There are currently 70 million serves in the world, with each one needing electricity to keep it powered up, and almost as much again to keep it cool.
How does green web hosting help?
Green web hosting is a service provided by a number of companies in the UK, where the host only use electricity from renewable sources, and also aim to minimise the amount of electricity actually consumed in the first place.
The datacentres that keep websites up and running use a huge amount of energy, which is usually produced by burning non-renewable fuels that emit carbon and a number of other pollutants.
In an energy efficient data centre, the hot air that is expelled by the servers is contained and directly extracted from the building, allowing the cooling system to work much more efficiently.
Such is the effectiveness of green web hosting that businesses currently running an in-house server could contribute to a 38 percent reduction (pdf) in the worlds datacentre energy usage by 2020, by moving across to a green hosting solution.
If youre unsure whether your web site is powered by green web hosting, its easy to find out.
The Green Web Foundation are a non-profit organisation that are looking to a future where the entire Internet runs on green web hosting.
Is a green web host right for you?

Climate Change & Global Warming

Ozone treaty taking a bite out of US greenhouse gas emissions

Ozone treaty taking a bite out of US greenhouse gas emissions

Ozone treaty taking a bite out of US greenhouse gas emissions.
American Geophysical Union WASHINGTON D.C. — The Montreal Protocol, the international treaty adopted to restore Earth’s protective ozone layer in 1989, has significantly reduced emissions of ozone-depleting chemicals from the United States.
In a twist, a new study shows the 30-year old treaty has had a major side benefit of reducing climate-altering greenhouse gas emissions from the U.S. That’s because the ozone-depleting substances controlled by the treaty are also potent greenhouse gases, with heat-trapping abilities up to 10,000 times greater than carbon dioxide over 100 years.
The new study is the first to quantify the impact of the Montreal Protocol on U.S. greenhouse gas emissions with atmospheric observations.
Previous studies have demonstrated that the Montreal Protocol has been more effective at curtailing global greenhouse gas emissions than any other international effort – even though climate change was not a consideration during the initial treaty negotiations in the late 1980s.
Journalists and PIOs may also order a copy of the final paper by emailing a request to Lauren Lipuma at llipuma@agu.org.
Title: “Considerable Contribution of the Montreal Protocol to Declining Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the United States” Authors: Lei Hu, Colm Sweeney, Debra J. Mondeel, David Nance: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado-Boulder and NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Global Monitoring Division, Boulder, Colorado, U.S.A.; Stephen A. Montzka, Arlyn E. Andrews, Kirk Thoning, John B. Miller, James W. Elkins, Bradley D. Hall, Pieter P. Tans: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Global Monitoring Division, Boulder, Colorado, U.S.A.; Scott J. Lehman: Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado-Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, U.S.A.; David S. Godwin: Stratospheric Protection Division, Office of Atmospheric Programs, Office of Air and Radiation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, District of Columbia, U.S.A.; Benjamin R. Miller: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado-Boulder, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Global Monitoring Division and Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado-Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, U.S.A.; Caroline Siso: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado-Boulder, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Global Monitoring Division, Boulder, Colorado, U.S.A. and Stratospheric Protection Division, Office of Atmospheric Programs, Office of Air and Radiation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, District of Columbia, U.S.A.; Thomas Nehrkorn, Marikate Mountain: Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Lexington, Massaschusetts, U.S.A.; Marc L. Fischer: Environmental Technologies Area, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, U.S.A.; Sébastien C. Biraud: Earth and Environmental Sciences Area, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, U.S.A.; Huilin Chen: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado-Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, U.S.A. and Centre for Isotope Research, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
From Eurkealert Public Release: 1-Aug-2017 FSU research: Chemical weathering could alleviate some climate change effects Florida State University TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — There could be some good news on the horizon as scientists try to understand the effects and processes related to climate change.
But what good is a Red Team if it would be smeared and intimidated even… Guest essay by Eric Worrall h/t JoNova – The closure of South Australia’s GM Holden Car Factory (13,000 jobs) will help stabilise South Australia’s green electricity grid, according to the government AEMO.
Holden closure will help Energy Market Operator manage SA’s blackout risk, report finds By political reporter Nick Harmsen Part of the soon-to-be vacated… Guest essay by Eric Worrall Building an energy producing nuclear fusion reactor remains elusive, but some companies are re-considering an old idea – combining nuclear fusion with nuclear fission in a single reactor, to overcome the disadvantages of both.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Top Electric Grid Regulator Will Make Keeping Coal Plants Online One Of His Main Goals

Top Electric Grid Regulator Will Make Keeping Coal Plants Online One Of His Main Goals

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Chairman Neil Chatterjee said he would look for ways to “properly compensate” coal plants for providing reliable electricity during his time as a top energy regulator.
And to that end, I believe baseload power should be recognized as an essential part of the fuel mix,” Chatterjee said in a video interview FERC officials posted online Monday.
Chatterjee’s comments are a nod to power plant operators and Republican lawmakers who worry that too much baseload power is being taken offline, in part, due to Obama administration energy regulations.
Coal supporters say zero marginal cost electricity, which is sometimes negative thanks to subsidies, want electricity rates to incorporate the benefits of providing 24/7 electricity.
“As a nation we need to ensure that coal, along with gas and renewables, continue to be part of our diverse fuel mix,” said Chatterjee, who served as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s energy adviser.
FERC is an independent regulatory commission that oversees the electric grid, natural gas pipeline siting, approval of natural gas export terminals and other energy infrastructure projects.
From Eurkealert Public Release: 1-Aug-2017 FSU research: Chemical weathering could alleviate some climate change effects Florida State University TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — There could be some good news on the horizon as scientists try to understand the effects and processes related to climate change.
31st 2017 9:10 am PT @technacity While clean energy is not a new area for Alphabet’s X, the moonshot division has previously only focused on energy creation.
Holden closure will help Energy Market Operator manage SA’s blackout risk, report finds By political reporter Nick Harmsen Part of the soon-to-be vacated… Guest essay by Eric Worrall Building an energy producing nuclear fusion reactor remains elusive, but some companies are re-considering an old idea – combining nuclear fusion with nuclear fission in a single reactor, to overcome the disadvantages of both.
While nuclear fusion’s key milestones remain elusive, could fusion-fission… Energy From The Daily Caller Michael Bastasch 9:06 PM 08/07/2017 One of the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) longest and most successful air pollution standards is based on a taxpayer-funded study plagued by “data fabrication and falsification,” according to a veteran toxicologist.

Climate Change & Global Warming

An Inconvenient Split?

An Inconvenient Split?

An Inconvenient Split?.
The same tired arguments and claims come round again: every climate conference is the last chance to save the planet; the Arctic ice is always about to vanish in one or two years, or ten years; climate scientists continue to be accused of selecting data sets to create hockeysticks and manipulating data; and teams of climate scientists keep producing reports saying almost exactly the same thing as the previous reports, which then get misrepresented and hyped by the media.
Consensus?
Some social scientists believe that telling people that there’s a consensus on climate change acts as a ‘gateway belief‘ leading to public action, even though their own data does not really support this claim.
Al Gore has a new film out, called “An Inconvenient Sequel”.
It’s no surprise that Bjorn Lomborg in the Wall Street Journal says that the film misses a few inconvenient facts.
Apparently it is “more a portrait of Gore than a call to arms”.
From Eurkealert Public Release: 1-Aug-2017 FSU research: Chemical weathering could alleviate some climate change effects Florida State University TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — There could be some good news on the horizon as scientists try to understand the effects and processes related to climate change.
With a new “exploration” called Malta, Alphabet is now looking at cost-effective energy storage solutions.
Holden closure will help Energy Market Operator manage SA’s blackout risk, report finds By political reporter Nick Harmsen Part of the soon-to-be vacated… Guest essay by Eric Worrall Building an energy producing nuclear fusion reactor remains elusive, but some companies are re-considering an old idea – combining nuclear fusion with nuclear fission in a single reactor, to overcome the disadvantages of both.

Climate Change & Global Warming

EU said to be considering electric car quota, despite denials

EU said to be considering electric car quota, despite denials

EU said to be considering electric car quota, despite denials.
Quota on the production of electric cars by 2030 would be mandatory, according to sources, with one calling the move “increasingly likely” Despite public denials, the European commission is considering implementing an electric car quota to be achieved by automakers by 2030, according to diplomats and sources familiar with the issue.
One source with knowledge of internal EU discussions told Climate Home that cabinet members in the bloc’s climate, industry, energy union and transport directorates had reached a consensus on the need for tough enforceable targets.
Climate Weekly: Sign up for your essential climate news update Contacted by Climate Home, Andreeva accepted that a binding target for ultra-low emitting vehicles was one of the options put forward for consideration by a commission paper last year.
“But the distinction between targets and quotas is important as targets are much softer than quotas, which are legally enforceable.” Despite this, Germany’s environment ministry reportedly expects a proposal that includes a quota on electric cars, as do commission cabinet members.
EU diplomats in Brussels confirmed to Climate Home that they did too.
Next month, the European parliament will also vote on a proposal for a 25% minimum fleet quota for electric cars by 2025 and ban on diesel and petrol engines by 2035.
The EU parliament can block, tweak or amend regulations in three-way negotiations with EU states, and with the commission.
Merkel has previously warned about the dangers of “demolishing” the diesel industry.
“They’re worried that they will finish up with an industry locked into old technologies that isn’t going to invest in the new solutions needed to maintain exports around the world.”

Pin It on Pinterest