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Wellness

The Internet Is Having a Field Day With Melania Trump’s First Lady Portrait

The Internet Is Having a Field Day With Melania Trump’s First Lady Portrait

The White House released Melania Trump’s official portrait as first lady on April 3 and a flurry of hilarious reactions on Twitter ensued because, well, that’s what Twitter is for.
pic.twitter.com/FOTeIWCH0w — Full Frontal (@FullFrontalSamB) April 3, 2017 @molly_knight @sahilkapur @FLOTUS a bold and unconventional portrait tbh molly pic.twitter.com/OoyhGtj9qR — darth™ (@darth) April 3, 2017 Congrats to Melania on her official portrait pic.twitter.com/SuTfebTtTI — Luke O’Neil (@lukeoneil47) April 3, 2017 How they FaceTune an official White House portrait?
Bye https://t.co/QPysRywVsQ — @MADBLACKTHOT (@MADBLACKTHOT) April 3, 2017 @nycjim Oh.
God.
It’s a Revlon ad.
— Jessica Craven (@Craven7Jessica) April 3, 2017 @TheCut five instagram filters and the liquefy tool in photoshop?
More like a Missing Person poster.
— Kimberly Sheinwald (@kimberlyybarra) April 3, 2017 The White House did not reveal the name of the photographer who took Trump’s portrait.
However, the first lady did offer a comment on her duties in a statement.
Image Source: The White House

Energy

Norway’s Aker BP Raises 2018 Dividend Forecast, More To Come

Norway’s Aker BP Raises 2018 Dividend Forecast, More To Come

“Our financial position has been strengthened.
We have seen a rapid de-leveraging, and foresee a solid cash generation combined with a strong liquidity position,” the company, 30 percent owned by BP, said in a statement.
The company said production could rise up to 330,000 boepd in 2023, including both approved and yet to be approved projects, up from a previous estimate of 270,000 boepd. “We are well positioned for further growth.
The company plans investments of about $1.3 billion in 2018, with exploration expected to account for $350 million and decommissioning expenditure $350 million.
Following the acquisition of Hess Norge and approval of three new developments at the end of 2017, the company revised its reserves up by 202 million boe to 913 million boe.
Aker BP plans to drill 12 exploration wells in 2018, up from nine wells last year, with potential discovery estimates ranging from 50 to 150 million boe net for the company.
(Reporting by Nerijus Adomaitis, Editing by Terje Solsvik and Mark Potter) Generated by readers, the comments included herein do not reflect the views and opinions of Rigzone.
All comments are subject to editorial review.
Off-topic, inappropriate or insulting comments will be removed.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Scotland’s historic sites at high risk from climate change, report says

Scotland’s historic sites at high risk from climate change, report says

Dozens of Scotland’s most famous historic sites are at very high risk of being badly damaged by climate change and need urgent protection, an expert survey has found.
Of those, 28 sites are identified as at the greatest risk because they are not yet properly protected.
They too are under constant supervision, lowering the threat level to amber, but HES officials warn that even so, protected sites could still be damaged by the far more severe weather events now being forecast.
Combined into a single database, the surveys have confirmed evidence from numerous places that already fragile or exposed historic sites are at even greater risk from heavier flooding, coastal erosion driven by stronger storms and rising sea levels, increased winter rainfall or much drier summers.
The database will be constantly updated and refined, said Ewan Hyslop, the agency’s head of technical research and science, particularly after far more detailed and updated UK-wide projections of climate risks are published in several months.
HES has increased the priority it gives to climate mitigation under legislation driven through by Nicola Sturgeon, Scotland’s first minister, which requires public bodies to factor climate change into their activities.
The budget of Sepa, the Scottish agency responsible for monitoring climate change, will also be cut again.
The research draws on forecasts from Sepa that sea levels around Scotland will increase by between 16.5 and 28 centimetres by 2050, threatening coastal sites such as Skara Brae.
The report notes: “Water is the most destructive agent of decay.
On a large scale, heavy and intense rainfall can directly lead to flooding in a short timeframe, which has the potential to cause catastrophic damage to all elements of the historic environment within reach of these potential flood zones.”

Conservation & Sustainability

Scotland’s historic sites at high risk from climate change, report says

Scotland’s historic sites at high risk from climate change, report says

Dozens of Scotland’s most famous historic sites are at very high risk of being badly damaged by climate change and need urgent protection, an expert survey has found.
Of those, 28 sites are identified as at the greatest risk because they are not yet properly protected.
They too are under constant supervision, lowering the threat level to amber, but HES officials warn that even so, protected sites could still be damaged by the far more severe weather events now being forecast.
Combined into a single database, the surveys have confirmed evidence from numerous places that already fragile or exposed historic sites are at even greater risk from heavier flooding, coastal erosion driven by stronger storms and rising sea levels, increased winter rainfall or much drier summers.
The database will be constantly updated and refined, said Ewan Hyslop, the agency’s head of technical research and science, particularly after far more detailed and updated UK-wide projections of climate risks are published in several months.
HES has increased the priority it gives to climate mitigation under legislation driven through by Nicola Sturgeon, Scotland’s first minister, which requires public bodies to factor climate change into their activities.
The budget of Sepa, the Scottish agency responsible for monitoring climate change, will also be cut again.
The research draws on forecasts from Sepa that sea levels around Scotland will increase by between 16.5 and 28 centimetres by 2050, threatening coastal sites such as Skara Brae.
The report notes: “Water is the most destructive agent of decay.
On a large scale, heavy and intense rainfall can directly lead to flooding in a short timeframe, which has the potential to cause catastrophic damage to all elements of the historic environment within reach of these potential flood zones.”

Organic Living

UK Gardener Grows Giant Organic Vegetables for Garden Shows

UK Gardener Grows Giant Organic Vegetables for Garden Shows

“Today I lifted my giant onions which have been growing for almost a year.
They have been grown hydroponically in an RTA air-pot dripper system.
There are a couple of things which I could have changed which could have altered the end result.” “Down on the allotment in the polytunnel I lifted my giant pot leeks for exhibition/show.
This show requires 3 pot leeks 6 inches to a tight button.
in this video I show you how I lift and wash my leeks in preparation for show.
This was the second show (ever) that I had benched/ exhibited my leeks at and I managed to scoop first place in style by smashing the record and showing 512cc for three leeks.
The purpose of growing these leeks is for exhibition but they are also edible and taste good.
They are not genetically modified nor are they pumped with chemicals.” “Here’s how I prepare sand boxes to grow my exhibition stump root carrots.”

Alternative Energy

‘Clean Energy Is a Fundamental Civil Right’: Major Campaign to Expand Access to Solar

‘Clean Energy Is a Fundamental Civil Right’: Major Campaign to Expand Access to Solar

The NAACP is launching a major environmental justice campaign on Jan. 13 to mark the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service.
Clients served by the Jenesse Center will also get hands-on training from GRID Alternatives during the installation, which will provide the women skills to access the booming solar energy industry.
The NAACP said that the Jenesse installation is expected to save the center an estimated $48,825 in lifetime financial savings and will help reduce harmful toxins and offset 90.06 tons of carbon emissions—the equivalent to planting more than 2,000 trees or taking 17 cars off the road. “Underserved communities cannot be left behind in a clean energy transition,” said NAACP president and CEO Derrick Johnson. “Clean energy is a fundamental civil right which must be available to all, within the framework of a just transition.”
We are thrilled to share with you that we’re teaming up with @NAACP during the weekend of @naacpimageaward and the… https://t.co/aKHoziO03X
Low-income communities, particularly communities of color, are disparately burdened by environmental pollution and the impacts of climate change.
A 2011 EarthJustice report found that in Alabama (24.5 percent) and Mississippi (26.5 percent), the poverty rate near coal plants is more than twice the national average.
In Tennessee the number of people living below the poverty line near coal plants is 41 percent higher than would be expected from the national average. “This initiative is in the true spirit of the legacy of Dr. King and underscores the mission of the NAACP to advance equity and justice,” said Leon Russell, chairman of the NAACP Board of Directors.

Alternative Energy

Diablo Canyon Closure Decision Missing Critical Elements

Diablo Canyon Closure Decision Missing Critical Elements

The historic proposal to retire and replace California’s last remaining nuclear power plant, Diablo Canyon, was mostly rejected Thursday in a final decision unanimously adopted by the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC), which removed critical elements protecting the climate, plant workers and surrounding communities.
While disappointing, the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) will continue to advocate forcefully to ensure that the CPUC authorizes increased investment in zero-carbon resources to replace the huge plant’s electricity generation—including energy efficiency, wind and solar—and avoid any increase in carbon pollution.
NRDC believes the Joint Proposal also is an inspiring model for other states and countries to follow when faced with the need to close aging and uneconomic nuclear plants.
In doing so, he dismissed the joint efforts of the multiple and diverse stakeholders represented in the proposal, and largely ignored testimony from the proposal’s supporters submitted in numerous briefs and hearings over the past 14 months.
The judge’s recommendation was adopted by the commission Thursday with some modest changes.
While noting “it is the intent of the Commission to avoid any increase in greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the closure of Diablo Canyon,” the CPUC missed a golden opportunity to begin a transition to zero-carbon replacement in rejecting the proposed 53 percent increase in how much energy PG&E; should help its customers save through energy efficiency programs, a prominent feature of the Joint Proposal.
The CPUC decision also: Makes no explicit provision for replacing any part of Diablo Canyon’s output with zero-carbon resources; and Disallows more than half of the Joint Proposal’s recommended transition support to plant workers and their communities (cutting $226 million out of a seven-year total of $448 million), which is crucial to ensuring the plant’s safe and reliable operation.
The Impact Worker retention is a major concern for plant safety, as well as for the small communities who rely on the plant for tax revenue.
The Joint Proposal included $448 million over seven years for worker retention, retraining and development programs, as well as community funds to maintain critical community services in the remaining years of operation.
The final decision included a commitment to avoiding a spike in greenhouse-gas-free emissions, but failed to authorize even a modest initial investment in energy efficiency to start to replace the output of the huge plant.

Organic Living

McDonald’s to Stop Using Foam Packaging by End of Year

McDonald’s to Stop Using Foam Packaging by End of Year

The company recently announced it will eliminate foam packaging, currently 2 percent of its packaging by weight, by the end of 2018.
Expanded polystyrene (EPS), often known by the brand name Styrofoam, is commonly used in food packaging because it’s lightweight, cheap to manufacture and good at temperature control (both hot and cold).
Cities like Los Angeles, New York and Washington, D.C., have already banned EPS packaging, meaning McDonald’s was already offering an alternative packaging in many of its locations.
It stopped using foam packaging for hot beverages in 2012 after receiving pressure from As You Sow, a nonprofit that promotes environmental and social corporate responsibility.
In its new announcement, McDonald’s is pledging to source 100 percent of its fiber-based packaging from certified or recycled sources by 2020.
Besides EPS, other products with limited recycling markets include plastic cutlery, straws and paper napkins.
McDonald’s Isn’t Alone McDonald’s is not the only restaurant that has faced criticism for its packaging, or taken efforts to improve its sustainability.
Starbucks is frequently in the news regarding the recyclability of its single-use cups, and in 2015 promised to make a 100 percent recyclable coffee cup.
The company uses 10 percent recycled paper content in its U.S. cups, compared with 50 percent recycled plastic content in its European cups.
For those debating that single-use packaging needs to be more sustainable, consider that manufacturing packaging from recycled content is often more expensive than using virgin material.

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Conservation & Sustainability

Scotland’s historic sites at high risk from climate change, report says

Scotland’s historic sites at high risk from climate change, report says

Dozens of Scotland’s most famous historic sites are at very high risk of being badly damaged by climate change and need urgent protection, an expert survey has found.
Of those, 28 sites are identified as at the greatest risk because they are not yet properly protected.
They too are under constant supervision, lowering the threat level to amber, but HES officials warn that even so, protected sites could still be damaged by the far more severe weather events now being forecast.
Combined into a single database, the surveys have confirmed evidence from numerous places that already fragile or exposed historic sites are at even greater risk from heavier flooding, coastal erosion driven by stronger storms and rising sea levels, increased winter rainfall or much drier summers.
The database will be constantly updated and refined, said Ewan Hyslop, the agency’s head of technical research and science, particularly after far more detailed and updated UK-wide projections of climate risks are published in several months.
HES has increased the priority it gives to climate mitigation under legislation driven through by Nicola Sturgeon, Scotland’s first minister, which requires public bodies to factor climate change into their activities.
The budget of Sepa, the Scottish agency responsible for monitoring climate change, will also be cut again.
The research draws on forecasts from Sepa that sea levels around Scotland will increase by between 16.5 and 28 centimetres by 2050, threatening coastal sites such as Skara Brae.
The report notes: “Water is the most destructive agent of decay.
On a large scale, heavy and intense rainfall can directly lead to flooding in a short timeframe, which has the potential to cause catastrophic damage to all elements of the historic environment within reach of these potential flood zones.”

Conservation & Sustainability

It’s time to go nuclear in the fight against climate change

It’s time to go nuclear in the fight against climate change

Something big has to change, and fast, in order to prevent us from going over the climate cliff.
Solar power has grown at a whopping 68 percent average rate over the past 10 years, but still accounts for less than 2 percent of total U.S. electricity generation.
The 99 reactors in the U.S. generate about 10 times that amount.
“In 2016, renewables received about 100 times more in federal subsidies than nuclear plants,” Michael Shellenberger, founder of the Berkeley, California-based, pro-nuclear advocacy group Environmental Progress, wrote in an email to Grist.
A similar story is playing out in Germany.
Jenkins wrote on Twitter that Germany’s shift in energy policy was misguided and resulted effectively in fossil fuels replacing much of the missing nuclear power — a pattern that’s playing out at home, as well.
For once-and-future climate leaders like Germany and the United States to turn their backs on one of the best tools we have for rapidly decarbonizing the global economy is a short-sighted decision of international and multi-generational consequence.
He and Shellenberger see support for the industry as a tactic for attracting the Trump Administration’s attention on climate policy.
The sheer urgency of climate change demands an all-of-the-above approach to making carbon-free energy.
The more the world feels the powerful effects of climate change and the longer we wait to reduce emissions the more attractive nuclear energy could become.

Conservation & Sustainability

Houston’s city-beautification efforts might also fight future flooding

Houston’s city-beautification efforts might also fight future flooding

On a recent afternoon, Beth White, CEO of the nonprofit Houston Parks Board, steps onto a trail along Brays Bayou in the southeastern part of the city.
There are 12 major bayous in Harris County, connecting 22 watersheds to the Gulf of Mexico.
White is walking near a meandering part of the Brays in the neighborhood of Idylwood.
Parks Board, a local nonprofit that advocates for green space, completed trails here in 2014, adding a kayak ramp and native plants as part of its Bayou Greenways 2020 project.
His research suggests that different natural features, like wetlands and reservoirs, help to mitigate flooding.
The Bayou Greenways project is based on a plan from 1912 to connect Houston’s bayous with park space.
In northeast Houston, the Greens Bayou Wetlands Mitigation Bank, finished in 2016, filters water and provides habitats for native species.
Flood Control planted trees along a river to prevent erosion and is using another creek to study how well prairies soak up floodwaters.
“We’re not primarily a flood-mitigation project,” she says.
After Harvey, Dinn organized a group of neighbors to clean debris out of the bayous.

Conservation & Sustainability

I Think I’m Going to Kathmandu: Citizen Science for Freshwater in Nepal

I Think I’m Going to Kathmandu: Citizen Science for Freshwater in Nepal

Now that I am settling in at The Nature Conservancy, I see more potential to develop citizen science platforms.
The Water Problem in Nepal’s Kathmandu Valley There has been recent and widespread interest, within both the Nepali government and the international community, in the further development of groundwater resources for irrigation, municipal, and industrial uses in the Kathmandu Valley.
In general, community-based monitoring and development efforts help identify water supply vulnerabilities and serve as the foundation for developing mitigation and/or adaptation measures.
A Case Study for Kathmandu Valley Since data collection is expensive, it is a clear limiting factor for resource management in Nepal and across much of the Global South.
In Kathmandu Valley, we’re trying to use mobile technology and establish a citizen science (i.e. community based) network for monitoring hydrology related data (e.g. groundwater levels, groundwater quality, flow from stone spouts, streamflow, precipitation).
My short hands-on experience while visiting the Chisopani regional school in Nepal is part of a broader partnership with Smartphones4Water where local stakeholders and citizen scientists are trained to perform hydrological measurements.
These measurements include monitoring groundwater levels, estimating spring and stream discharge, and assessing water quality with simple testing strips.
When possible, we engage local students in grades 6 through 12 and emphasize employing women for the collection of new hydrologic data.
What Is the Role of Citizen Science for Conservation?
Given The Nature Conservancy’s growing commitment to helping develop connections between nature AND people, citizen science really could serve as a long-lasting and impactful approach to monitoring, informing and targeting conservation where it matters most.

Conservation & Sustainability

What If All Maps Were Secret?

What If All Maps Were Secret?

But I’m a geographer who works in a country where all of the maps were once secret.
One day I went to do a survey in Long Duhung, a small remote village in East Kalimantan, on the island of Borneo in Indonesia.
I asked one of villagers why the river was so brown, and he said an industrial oil palm plantation created some deforested areas near the village.
How come policy makers were approving logging and plantations in the village forest areas?
At The Nature Conservancy, I’m one of the people who helps turn geographic data into a flat map with the least amount of distortion, so you can look at an online or paper map and find what you are looking for.
In East Kalimantan, we use spatial data to help logging concessions sustainably manage their forests.
But leaders have been slow in using accurate maps for planning and policy decisions.
In East Kalimantan and throughout Borneo, primary forest and good condition of secondary forest are often given to oil palm concessions without a good baseline from spatial information.
A large part of my work at the Conservancy involves creating tools to share maps and GIS data, to make sure the maps used for conservation and land-use planning are accurate.
My colleagues and I developed a WebGIS that provides spatial data layers for decision makers and the public in East Kalimantan’s Berau district.

Conservation & Sustainability

The Ultimate Winter Wildlife Guide: Enjoy and Understand Creatures in the Cold

The Ultimate Winter Wildlife Guide: Enjoy and Understand Creatures in the Cold

Is winter bird feeding good or bad for birds?
Do you want to spot a snowy owl, or track wildlife in the snow?
Here is a digest of our winter wildlife content, with stories on how wildlife survives and thrives in the winter, and others on fun winter wildlife experiences for you.
A naturalist can find interesting critters at any season, but I’ve always found winter adventures to be some of the best (and most family friendly).
Following tracks is often the best way to learn habits of undisturbed wildlife.
Winter is not the off-season for birding.
(Okay, at least not until next winter.)
And there are some bird species that you really can only realistically find in winter.
Many bird species make use of a variety of shelters – from tree cavities to old shoes – to survive a cold winter’s night, as Joe Smith reports.
One plant in particular is deadly to ungulates, last year killing dozens of elk and an unknown number of mule deer in Idaho alone.

LATEST FROMClimate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change & Global Warming

Scotland’s historic sites at high risk from climate change, report says

Scotland’s historic sites at high risk from climate change, report says

Dozens of Scotland’s most famous historic sites are at very high risk of being badly damaged by climate change and need urgent protection, an expert survey has found.
Of those, 28 sites are identified as at the greatest risk because they are not yet properly protected.
They too are under constant supervision, lowering the threat level to amber, but HES officials warn that even so, protected sites could still be damaged by the far more severe weather events now being forecast.
Combined into a single database, the surveys have confirmed evidence from numerous places that already fragile or exposed historic sites are at even greater risk from heavier flooding, coastal erosion driven by stronger storms and rising sea levels, increased winter rainfall or much drier summers.
The database will be constantly updated and refined, said Ewan Hyslop, the agency’s head of technical research and science, particularly after far more detailed and updated UK-wide projections of climate risks are published in several months.
HES has increased the priority it gives to climate mitigation under legislation driven through by Nicola Sturgeon, Scotland’s first minister, which requires public bodies to factor climate change into their activities.
The budget of Sepa, the Scottish agency responsible for monitoring climate change, will also be cut again.
The research draws on forecasts from Sepa that sea levels around Scotland will increase by between 16.5 and 28 centimetres by 2050, threatening coastal sites such as Skara Brae.
The report notes: “Water is the most destructive agent of decay.
On a large scale, heavy and intense rainfall can directly lead to flooding in a short timeframe, which has the potential to cause catastrophic damage to all elements of the historic environment within reach of these potential flood zones.”

Climate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending January 12, 2018

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending January 12, 2018

  None of the four points discussed below is a scientific finding, or a technological development. This may be our

Climate Change & Global Warming

Is taking a sabbatical on your wish list? Here’s how to make it happen

Is taking a sabbatical on your wish list? Here’s how to make it happen

From time to time, running away from our job to take time off for a few months has crossed most of our minds!
The usual job ‘perks’, such as being paid and your pension contributions, may be suspended for the duration of the sabbatical period.
However, employees have the security of returning to their job.
Here are six steps you can take to make it possible!
Are you constantly burned out and need to recharge?
Don’t lead the conversation by saying, “you’re not happy at work therefore think is time for a break”, instead, say that you would like to take time off and focus on how you can become a better employee.
Make this easy to understand to everyone who will be directly impacted by your decision.
Prep your colleagues Now that your boss is onboard with it all, it’s time to prep your colleagues who will be taking some of your work while you’re gone.
Make a promise to yourself to disconnect from ALL things work related, like emails and calls and remind yourself why you took this time away, to begin with.
Plan your reentry A week or two before you return to work, start going through your work emails and reaching out to colleagues who were helpful through the process.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Tesla’s South Australian super battery beats expectations for first month

Tesla’s South Australian super battery beats expectations for first month

The aspect that has generated the most interest is the battery’s rapid response time in smoothing out several major energy outages that have occurred since it was installed.
Victoria’s government will be tracking the Hornsdale battery’s early performance with interest.
Generation and Consumption Over the full month of December, the Hornsdale power reserve generated 2.42 gigawatt-hours of energy, and consumed 3.06GWh.
Frequency Control Ancillary Services There are eight different Frequency Control Ancillary Services (FCAS) markets in the National Electricity Market (NEM).
As the service may have to increase or decrease the frequency, there is thus a total of six contingency markets (three that raise frequency in the timescales above, and three that reduce it).
This is one of the services that the Hornsdale Power Reserve has been providing.
However, unlike contingency services, which essentially wait for an unexpected change in frequency, the response is governed by a control signal, sent from the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO).
This control signal alters the output of the generator such that the supply and demand balanced is maintained.
As can be seen, the output of the battery closely follows the amount of capacity it has enabled in the regulation market.
With the costs and need for frequency control service increasing in recent years, the boost to supply through the Hornsdale power reserve is good news for consumers, and a timely addition to Australia’s energy market.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Macron urges Chinese people to “make our planet great again” – in Mandarin

Macron urges Chinese people to “make our planet great again” – in Mandarin

French president did not announce any new climate initiatives with Xi Jinping on China visit, but his efforts to learn the language went viral French president Emmanuel Macron charmed the Chinese public by delivering his climate slogan “make our planet great again” in Mandarin during a three-day visit to China.
Parce que le climat parle à tout le monde : “Make our planet great again” … en chinois.
pic.twitter.com/C6UTeP16Nr — Emmanuel Macron (@EmmanuelMacron) January 8, 2018 Observers hoping for new climate change initiatives were disappointed by a joint statement from Macron and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping, however.
Climate activists have pinned high hopes on the two leaders to renew political momentum for the international climate treaty that aims to limit global temperature rise within 2C, despite the White House.
Report: Macron summit touts green finance progress – despite Trump Yet in their joint statement, released by Xinhua News Agency on Wednesday, Macron and Xi focused on what was already agreed.
The two reassured each other they would “deepen cooperation” on environment and climate change, and applauded each other’s recent achievements: the Paris One Planet Summit hosted by France and soft launch of a national emissions trading scheme in China.
Both sides expressed satisfaction with progress that had been made on green financing since China hosted the G20 summit in Hangzhou in 2016, according to the statement.
As a demonstration of the two countries’ commitment to multilateralism, Xi and Macron said they will “keep constructive dialogues on international treaties”, including biodiversity, nature conservation and protecting marine life.
Li Shuo, a senior climate campaigner with Greenpeace, said the dialogue “strikes the right tone for this critical year of climate action, when over 190 nations are expected to work out detailed rules to implement Paris Agreement.
“Going forward, a Sino-France alliance is critical in effectively implementing the Paris Agreement and strengthening global climate ambition.” Among a string of business deals with China Macron secured during his visits, cooperation deals on nuclear and aviation were framed as means to tackle climate change by some Chinese observers.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Climate portfolio back in UK cabinet after May’s reshuffle

Climate portfolio back in UK cabinet after May’s reshuffle

Key appointments: Greg Clark stays as secretary of state for the department of business, energy and industrial strategy (Beis) Climate minister Claire Perry remains in her role, but will now attend cabinet Environment secretary Michael Gove, international trade secretary Liam Fox, and foreign secretary Boris Johnson, all kept their jobs After much speculation, Beis secretary of state Greg Clark today kept his role as secretary of state for Beis.
The biggest change was for climate change minister Claire Perry who won a slight promotion and will now attend cabinet meetings as minister of state at the department for business, energy and industrial strategy (Beis).
Perry, the MP for Devizes in Wiltshire since 2010, was appointed climate minister in June last year.
UK: Government details coal power phase-out strategy Perry has made a couple of notable announcements during her seven months as climate minister.
In October 2017, the department published the long-awaited Clean Growth Strategy, which set out how the government hopes to meet its climate targets and reduce emissions.
Analysts have warned that new policies “need to progress quickly” if the government is going to meet its carbon budgets.
In November, Perry joined Canada’s minister of environment Catherine McKenna at the UN climate talks in Bonn to announce the launch of the Powering Past Coal Alliance.
The alliance of countries, states and regions committed to closing coal power plants that don’t have carbon capture and storage technology was largely welcomed in Bonn.
But environmentalists warned the announcement was “only the start of the journey”, and urged countries to specify how they would reduce their reliance on coal.
The plan was met with cautious optimism by environmentalists, though it was seen as “a missed opportunity” to remove coal generation from the UK‘s energy mix at an earlier date.

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