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Wellness

The Quick Calisthenics Workout You Can Do Anywhere

The Quick Calisthenics Workout You Can Do Anywhere

Check off all three with this quick bodyweight-only calisthenics workout, featuring moves from Daily Burn’s DB10 program.
Then jump right in to a workout you’ll want to keep repeating.
Explode back up, performing another 180-degree jump back to the front (e).
Then, push off your feet to explode up in the air, switching your stance and landing back down in a lunge with your right foot forward (c).
Jump both feet to the outside of your right hand, then back to plank position (d).
Jump both feet to the outside of your left hand, then back to plank position (e).
Perform one burpee by placing your hands on the ground and jumping your feet back to a plank.
Then, quickly jump them back up to your hands and explode up at the top to perform another hop (b).
Perform another skater to each side, then repeat the burpee (e).
Want more quick, effective and fun workout routines?

Alternative Energy

Amazon Reef: BP Drilling Plans Dealt Another Blow by Brazilian Regulator

Amazon Reef: BP Drilling Plans Dealt Another Blow by Brazilian Regulator

BP’s plans to drill for oil near a huge coral reef in the mouth of Amazon river have been dealt a further blow after a regulator questioned the company’s environmental risk assessment.
Ibama, Brazil’s federal environmental agency, rejected an environmental study from the British oil giant, further delaying the company’s plans to drill in the region.
The news comes just a few weeks after Unearthed revealed that the British oil giant discussed concerns over environmental licensing in Brazil with a UK government minister.
In order to drill for oil in the region, companies have to submit environmental impact assessments (EIA) to Ibama.
Ibama said the methodology in BP’s EIA for the FZA-M-59 block was “very limited” and the regulator needed more information about what the impact of a oil spill might be in the region. “As part of the licensing process for drilling a well on the FZA-M-59 block, BP has received the first technical opinion requesting clarifications to the environmental impact study that was presented. “Under Brazilian legislation and the licensing process managed by IBAMA, requests for clarifications related to the environmental study typically can and do occur several times before the issuance of an environmental permit.”
30 percent chance of a spill hitting the reef Previous assessments filed by the oil majors have caused controversy.
Earlier this year, Unearthed reported that documents filed by Total and BP to Ibama showed that there was a 30 percent chance that a prospective spill from the company’s shared blocks could reach the reef.
Just a few weeks later, Unearthed found a document showing that BP intended to use a chemical known as Corexit in the event of an oil spill in the region.

Alternative Energy

12 Projects That Undermine the One Planet Summit and Put the Climate at Risk

12 Projects That Undermine the One Planet Summit and Put the Climate at Risk

As world leaders and global financial institutions gather for the One Planet Summit on Dec. 12 in Paris, civil society groups have come together under the Big Shift Global campaign to underscore the massive finance gap remaining to shift away from fossil fuels and toward clean energy, in line with the aim of the Paris agreement on climate change to limit warming to below 1.5°C.
Monday, these groups released a briefing titled Dirty Dozen: How Public Finance Drives the Climate Crisis through Oil, Gas, and Coal Expansion, highlighting fossil fuel projects by the World Bank Group, other multilateral and national development banks and export credit agencies.
These projects are examples that demonstrate how public finance is still acting as a critical lifeline for destructive fossil fuel projects, many of which could not otherwise be built, and how this support continues to this day, a full year after the Paris agreement entered into force.
On average, public finance institutions controlled by G20 governments, along with multilateral development banks such as the World Bank Group, provide $71.8 billion per year in public finance for fossil fuels, and only $18.7 billion in public finance for clean energy (figure taken from from the report Talk is Cheap: How G20 Governments are Financing Climate Disaster, July 2017). “It’s been over a year since the Paris agreement on climate change entered into force, and two years since it was agreed—yet our governments still provide billions more in public finance for fossil fuels than for clean energy,” said Alex Doukas, director of the Stop Funding Fossils Program at Oil Change International. “This briefing highlights some of the most egregious fossil fuel projects receiving government financing, including exploration for more oil and gas that can never be burned if we have any hope of limiting the damage from climate change.”
Accompanying the briefing, more than 175 civil society groups from over 55 countries have signed a letter urging multilateral development banks (such as the World Bank Group), export credit agencies, and the governments backing them to stop funding fossil fuels by 2020, with an urgent and immediate need to move away from financing for oil and gas exploration projects, coal mining and coal-fired power plants.
The Dirty Dozen briefing presents a wide spectrum of dirty projects, ranging from the Southern Gas Corridor (SGC) project running from Azerbaijan to Italy (the European Investment Bank will consider a proposed 1.5 billion EUR loan for the Trans-Adriatic Pipeline, the final leg of the SGC, at its Dec. 11-12 board meeting), to the 1,000-MW Cirebon 2 coal plant in Indonesia.
The World Bank Group, European Investment Bank, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, Asian Development Bank and Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank together have offered $8.07 billion to the SGC in approved and proposed loans and guarantees out $45 billion in estimated project costs, while the Cirebon 2 coal plant is receiving almost $1.15 billion in finance or guarantees from the Japan Bank for International Cooperation and the Korea Export Import Bank, two of the world’s biggest coal financiers.
See the full list of the Dirty Dozen projects here.

Energy

In the heart of the West Texas oil patch, a new fracking frenzy is putting a strain on groundwater.

In the heart of the West Texas oil patch, a new fracking frenzy is putting a strain on groundwater.

Why would my neighbor be drilling a water well?
In 2010, an estimated 100 million gallons of water were used for fracking in Howard County alone.
Last year, 30 billion gallons of water were used for fracking in the Permian Basin.
Grella, of West Texas H2O, told local water regulators last year that oil companies are demanding a “mind-boggling” volume of groundwater from his company and other commercial water sellers.
If pumping isn’t slowed in Howard County, the same fate could await the Phillipses and their neighbors, said John Campbell, board president of the Permian Basin Underground Water Conservation District, which regulates groundwater in the county.
“We don’t want anybody to run out of water.” “I hope they don’t let anybody else come in and just drill willy-nilly without any kind of check on them.” After submitting their petition, Charles and Loyce figured the conservation district would shut down the wells or at least place limits on how much water the company could sell.
“It looks just like Midland out here now,” Loyce said.
… That’s what we have to look at on a very local scale.” Howard County Judge Kathryn Wiseman questions whether using groundwater for fracking is sustainable.
These local water conservation districts, about 100 of them statewide, have some say-so over how much water can be pumped from aquifers and how best to conserve the resource.
Tracy, the Texas A&M groundwater expert, said dustups such as the one in Howard County sometimes reveal inconsistencies in water district rules.

Wellness

This is the protein-packed smoothie Jessica Alba—and her daughters—drink in the morning

This is the protein-packed smoothie Jessica Alba—and her daughters—drink in the morning

Like your first supercharged cup of coffee, it can be easy (and satisfying) to DIY your own breakfast smoothie for an early a.m. energy boost.
Just ask Jessica Alba.
Part of the celeb’s morning routine is blending breakfast drinks for herself and her girls, Honor, 9, and Haven, 6.
(It was Alba’s nutritionist and good friend Kelly LeVeque who initially got her hooked on making them to keep her blood sugar balanced.)
Right now, the mother-daughter trio is loving a particular recipe that’s packed with protein and superfoods.
“The protein powder keeps me full for the first few hours of my day.” Alba’s current favorite recipe combines green tea matcha, raw organic protein powder, half a Zico coconut water, one banana, a Tbsp of coconut oil and ice.
“The coconut oil and matcha give me a much-needed energy boost, the potassium from the bananas and coconut water provide electrolytes, and the protein powder keeps me full for the first few hours of my day,” explains Alba.
It requires one small edit, however, to become kid-friendly and child-approved: “I swap the green tea matcha for hazelnut butter,” she says.
(Yum!)
More proof Jessica Alba’s smoothie game is strong: This is the recipe she blends to help get glowy skin, and here are the genius hacks she uses to maintain her healthy home.

Climate Change & Global Warming

‘Tsunami of data’ could consume one fifth of global electricity by 2025

‘Tsunami of data’ could consume one fifth of global electricity by 2025

Billions of internet-connected devices could produce 3.5% of global emissions within ten years and 14% by 2040, new research will find The communications industry could use 20% of all the world’s electricity by 2025, hampering global attempts to meet climate change targets and straining grids as demand by power-hungry server farms storing digital data from billions of smartphones, tablets and internet-connected devices grows exponentially.
Global computing power demand from internet-connected devices, high resolution video streaming, emails, surveillance cameras and a new generation of smart TVs is increasing 20% a year, consuming roughly 3-5% of the world’s electricity in 2015, says Swedish researcher Anders Andrae.
In an update to a 2016 peer-reviewed study, Andrae found that without dramatic increases in efficiency, the ICT industry could use 20% of all electricity and emit up to 5.5% of the world’s carbon emissions by 2025.
He expects industry power demand to increase from 2-300Twh of electricity a year now, to 1,200 or even 3,000Twh by 2025.
5G, [the fifth generation of mobile technology] is coming, IP [internet protocol] traffic is much higher than estimated and all cars and machines, robots and artificial intelligence are being digitalised, producing huge amounts of data which is stored in data centres.” US researchers expect power consumption to triple in the next five years as one billion more people come online in developing countries, and the “internet of things”, driverless cars, robots, video surveillance and artificial intelligence grows exponentially in rich countries.
“We are seeing massive growth of data centres in all regions.
Ireland, which with Denmark is becoming a data base for the world’s biggest tech companies, has 350MW connected to data centres but this is expected to triple to over 1,000MW, or the equivalent of a nuclear power station size plant, in the next five years.
In most cases they are buying it off grid but some are planning to build solar and wind farms close to their centres.
“The good news is that some companies have certainly embraced their responsibility, and are moving quite aggressively to meet their rapid growth with renewable energy.
Eirgrid estimates indicate that by 2025, one in every 3kWh generated in Ireland could be going to a data centre, he added.

Organic Living

Your Smart Thermostat Tutorial

Your Smart Thermostat Tutorial

If you’re interested in smart home gadgets and green technology, you’ve probably considered adding a smart thermostat to your home.
Although smart thermostats are relatively easy to install, it can be intimidating to install any product that involves electrical panels and accessing your home’s raw wiring.
Here’s a quick overview of the setup process, and a brief guide to the benefits you’ll want to take advantage of right out of the gate.
Cut the power to your home’s HVAC system (normally on your home’s breaker panel and maybe a separate panel by the unit outside of the house), pop the old thermostat off of the wall, and carefully remove the wiring from the old unit (labeling it as you go).
Simply follow the on-screen setup instructions, connect the unit to your home Wi-Fi, and select a few quick settings about your HVAC setup.
The whole process typically takes about 30 minutes (for each unit), which is a small amount of time to invest for such a significant upgrade to your home.
Starting with the Best Features Once your connected thermostat is installed, it’s time to explore some of its fun new smart features.
For most users, that’s setting up a schedule and turning on advanced functionality.
Taking Steps to a Smarter Home While installing a smart thermostat is a relatively simple process, keep in mind that you can have help from professionals, especially if it’s part of an entire smart home system.
Smart thermostats are a fantastic home upgrade, but they’re only a first step toward a smarter, more efficient home.

Conservation & Sustainability

Recovery: Why Sea Lampreys Need to be Restored and Killed

Recovery: Why Sea Lampreys Need to be Restored and Killed

They were collecting sea lampreys at dams and killing them.
As a child living near Lake Michigan he learned how sea lampreys had virtually extirpated the native lake trout of the Great Lakes.
In the fall of 2016 she supervised Connecticut’s biggest dam removal to date — tearing down the 17-foot-high Norton Dam on the Jeremy River and opening 17 miles of upstream habitat that hadn’t been available to anadromous fish or downstream resident fish since 1726.
If they fish, they fish somewhere else.
With no ammocoetes and no pheromones it got no adult lampreys.
“In the Great Lakes they’re still struggling with lake trout recruitment and they’ve had lamprey control much longer,” she says.
Leading the opposition is the commission’s Randy Eshenroder who believes sea lampreys entered Lakes Ontario and Champlain via the canal system and accurately points out that there are no records of Lake Champlain sea lampreys before 1929 and that reports of lamprey wounds on lake trout in both lakes are absent from early literature.
(Everyone agrees that sea lampreys from Lake Ontario, native or alien, invaded the upper Great Lakes via the Welland Canal.)
If sea lampreys indeed got into these lakes on their own, salmon and lake trout would have had to evolve a means of dealing with them.
Gephard, friend to lampreys only on the East Coast, offers this: “Nobody’s going to put up with sea lampreys in Lakes Ontario and Champlain.

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Conservation & Sustainability

Recovery: Why Sea Lampreys Need to be Restored and Killed

Recovery: Why Sea Lampreys Need to be Restored and Killed

They were collecting sea lampreys at dams and killing them.
As a child living near Lake Michigan he learned how sea lampreys had virtually extirpated the native lake trout of the Great Lakes.
In the fall of 2016 she supervised Connecticut’s biggest dam removal to date — tearing down the 17-foot-high Norton Dam on the Jeremy River and opening 17 miles of upstream habitat that hadn’t been available to anadromous fish or downstream resident fish since 1726.
If they fish, they fish somewhere else.
With no ammocoetes and no pheromones it got no adult lampreys.
“In the Great Lakes they’re still struggling with lake trout recruitment and they’ve had lamprey control much longer,” she says.
Leading the opposition is the commission’s Randy Eshenroder who believes sea lampreys entered Lakes Ontario and Champlain via the canal system and accurately points out that there are no records of Lake Champlain sea lampreys before 1929 and that reports of lamprey wounds on lake trout in both lakes are absent from early literature.
(Everyone agrees that sea lampreys from Lake Ontario, native or alien, invaded the upper Great Lakes via the Welland Canal.)
If sea lampreys indeed got into these lakes on their own, salmon and lake trout would have had to evolve a means of dealing with them.
Gephard, friend to lampreys only on the East Coast, offers this: “Nobody’s going to put up with sea lampreys in Lakes Ontario and Champlain.

Conservation & Sustainability

People of color and low-income residents still haven’t gotten the help they need after Hurricane Harvey.

People of color and low-income residents still haven’t gotten the help they need after Hurricane Harvey.

A new report by Kaiser Family Foundation and the Episcopal Health Foundation found economic and health disparities among those affected by Harvey.
Sixty-six percent of black residents surveyed said they are not getting the help they need to recover, compared to half of all hurricane survivors.
While 34 percent of white residents said their FEMA applications had been approved, just 13 percent of black residents said the same.
And even though they are receiving less assistance, black and Hispanic respondents and those with lower incomes were more likely to have experienced property damage or loss of income as a result of the storm.
Additionally, 1 in 6 people reported that someone in their household has a health condition that is new or made worse because of Harvey.
Lower-income adults and people of color who survived the storm were more likely to lack health insurance and to say they don’t know where to go for medical care.
“This survey gives an important voice to hard-hit communities that may have been forgotten, especially those with the greatest needs and fewest resources following the storm,” Elena Marks, president and CEO of the Episcopal Health Foundation, said in a statement.

Conservation & Sustainability

No Shame, No Future

No Shame, No Future

Donald Trump considers himself exceptional and, on this one thing, he’s absolutely correct.
His gift for unprincipled pandering to exploitative greed has no peer.
It would be by far the largest elimination of protected areas in U.S. history, and it would undercut the principle of permanent protection that underpins the security of all America’s wildlife refuges, national monuments, and national parks.
If Trump succeeds in this action, it might be the worst act of vandalism ever committed on our public lands.
The moment for discouragement came and went a year ago, when Trump lost the popular vote but won the electoral college and his party kept control of Congress.
Since then, the only productive responses have been persistence and resistance, and that doesn’t stop today.
As for the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, there’s still time to pressure lawmakers to take it out of the tax bill (get out your phone and call 202–730–9006), and we have ways to keep fighting even if they don’t.
Looking down the road, we now are less than a year away from midterm elections that could dramatically alter the balance of power in Washington.
Just one of those many benefits is that no longer will we need to defend our public lands from the fossil fuel barons who want to plunder them.
And this week it might seem like we’re farther away than ever.

Conservation & Sustainability

Four Crazy Ways Cool Creatures Survive Cold Winters

Four Crazy Ways Cool Creatures Survive Cold Winters

Black bears take a nap and recycle their pee.
Black Bears: Recycling Urine Conserves Strength Imagine dropping into a deep sleep after surgery or an accident and waking up four months later healed, with little muscle mass missing.
They also don’t lose much muscle mass and strength.
What they lose in muscle mass is recycled.” It also heals.
“Only when they’re starving and really cold.” Harlow and other researchers once gathered both species of prairie dogs and placed them in a confined area in the fall with proper bedding and turned on the air conditioning.
How can a mammal spend most of its day walking on a sheet of ice with nothing more than the pads on its paws?
The former prevents cold from circulating throughout the animal’s body, and the latter prevents the critter’s feet from turning black from frostbite.
The cool blood then circulates back through your feet and legs and insides to your heart, eventually cooling your body.
Ken Storey, a professor at Carleton College in Alberta, Canada, who studies freeze tolerance, explains it best: “Water outside of the cells is frozen and it leaves behind really concentrated goop.
“Another sugar would do, glycerol would do, but the frogs don’t build that up.

Conservation & Sustainability

In Massachusetts, Protesters Balk At Pipeline Company’s Payments To Police

In Massachusetts, Protesters Balk At Pipeline Company’s Payments To Police

― When Karla Colon-Aponte arrived at the Otis State Forest on the morning of Oct. 25, she intended to join her fellow protesters praying beside energy giant Kinder Morgan’s Connecticut Expansion Project line, a four-mile-long natural gas pipeline that runs in a loop through the town of Sandisfield in the Berkshire hills of western Massachusetts.
She was one of five people arrested that day, and one of the more than 100 who have been arrested protesting at the pipeline this year.
But Kinder Morgan footing the bill for state police protecting this one four-mile loop of pipeline has the local activist community questioning how fair the officers on site can be to protesters when some of their income comes, albeit indirectly, from the pipeline’s operator.
“We are committed to nonviolent direct action resisting the construction of fossil fuel infrastructure,” said Ferla.
Hinds also has concerns about how the state police have treated protesters at the site.
“Kinder Morgan should not interfere with peaceful protests,” said Warren.
The documents Kristofferson obtained show that state police officers were paid overtime rates for the Kinder Morgan work, rather than the salaries they would get for covering their regular detail.
“I don’t care if they want to get side jobs,” Kristofferson said.
“But they should do it in Kinder Morgan shirts and gear, not with cruisers and weaponry purchased by the commonwealth.” Now that the pipeline is in operation, the alliance is figuring out how much protest presence to maintain at the site, Ferla said.
“One of our goals in resistance is to bring attention to fossil fuel projects,” said Ferla.

Conservation & Sustainability

The Keystone pipeline has leaked way more often than TransCanada said it would.

The Keystone pipeline has leaked way more often than TransCanada said it would.

A report from Reuters found that the conduit has spilled more oil, more often, than the company’s official risk assessments initially indicated.
Keystone has sprung three major leaks since it began operating seven years ago, including a 210,000-gallon spill this month.
Two of the leaks happened in South Dakota, where TransCanada estimated the line would spill “no more than once every 41 years.” Over the entire pipeline, the company had predicted that a 2,100-gallon leak would not occur “more than once every seven to 11 years.” The pipeline resumed operations on Tuesday after TransCanada shut down a section for cleanup after the Nov. 16 leak.
If a South Dakota commission probing the recent spill finds that the company violated requirements for pipeline inspection and other environmental safeguards, it could revoke TransCanada’s permit to operate in the state.
It’s been a rough couple of weeks for TransCanada.
A Nebraska commission approved a route for the northern leg of the Trump-revived Keystone XL project last week — but it wasn’t the one TransCanada wanted.
And the alternate course could welcome new lawsuits and land negotiations that may take years to resolve.

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Climate Change & Global Warming

‘Tsunami of data’ could consume one fifth of global electricity by 2025

‘Tsunami of data’ could consume one fifth of global electricity by 2025

Billions of internet-connected devices could produce 3.5% of global emissions within ten years and 14% by 2040, new research will find The communications industry could use 20% of all the world’s electricity by 2025, hampering global attempts to meet climate change targets and straining grids as demand by power-hungry server farms storing digital data from billions of smartphones, tablets and internet-connected devices grows exponentially.
Global computing power demand from internet-connected devices, high resolution video streaming, emails, surveillance cameras and a new generation of smart TVs is increasing 20% a year, consuming roughly 3-5% of the world’s electricity in 2015, says Swedish researcher Anders Andrae.
In an update to a 2016 peer-reviewed study, Andrae found that without dramatic increases in efficiency, the ICT industry could use 20% of all electricity and emit up to 5.5% of the world’s carbon emissions by 2025.
He expects industry power demand to increase from 2-300Twh of electricity a year now, to 1,200 or even 3,000Twh by 2025.
5G, [the fifth generation of mobile technology] is coming, IP [internet protocol] traffic is much higher than estimated and all cars and machines, robots and artificial intelligence are being digitalised, producing huge amounts of data which is stored in data centres.” US researchers expect power consumption to triple in the next five years as one billion more people come online in developing countries, and the “internet of things”, driverless cars, robots, video surveillance and artificial intelligence grows exponentially in rich countries.
“We are seeing massive growth of data centres in all regions.
Ireland, which with Denmark is becoming a data base for the world’s biggest tech companies, has 350MW connected to data centres but this is expected to triple to over 1,000MW, or the equivalent of a nuclear power station size plant, in the next five years.
In most cases they are buying it off grid but some are planning to build solar and wind farms close to their centres.
“The good news is that some companies have certainly embraced their responsibility, and are moving quite aggressively to meet their rapid growth with renewable energy.
Eirgrid estimates indicate that by 2025, one in every 3kWh generated in Ireland could be going to a data centre, he added.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Too late for the extinct or critically-endangered on Earth—BUT — ?

Too late for the extinct or critically-endangered on Earth—BUT — ?

The lost species have gone down in a brief blaze of glory before they are forgotten.
The latest update on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species data concerns domestic crop ancestors, various extreme threats to mammals and the terrible fate of many species on Christmas Island.
Islands of course have long been known to lose animal and plant species as soon as anthropomorphic influences start to affect them.
To quote IUCN, Island populations of endemic species are particularly susceptible to decline due to their small populations, limited genetic diversity, lack of immunity to novel diseases and naivety towards introduced predators, according to the Red List.
To fill in some little detail the Japanese snake, Opisthotropis kikuzatoi known as Kikuzatos stream snake that has been declining from relatively common to critically endangered in only 15 years.
We lose more than a species when this happens.
To lose the first-cultivated species and varieties would be madness in that situation.
Pseudocheirus occidentalis is now losing 80% of its population (over a decade) due to food-plant losses among eucalyptus and peppermint forests near Perth, predation form both foxes and cats, and possibly global warming, bringing temperatures above 350C.
These near extinctions are themselves important because they point in the 2 directions by which each of the animals or plants can progress.
Some effort is needed to help out at the local and the international level, whether with a common species or a rapidly declining one.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change Week in Review: Week Ending December 8, 2017

Climate Change Week in Review: Week Ending December 8, 2017

There was a time, not too long ago, when “no nukes” was a mantra among those who considered themselves friends

Climate Change & Global Warming

Claim: Peeing in the Shower will Help Save the Climate

Claim: Peeing in the Shower will Help Save the Climate

Do something about it and start peeing in the shower According to science, you could actively help to save the planet by peeing in the shower.
And we have Colbert to back us up.
The average flush of a modern toilet takes about six litres of water, and the average adult pees about seven times every day.
I suspect that number rises during Oktoberfest, but you get the general idea.
The point is, you’re using 42 litres of water every single day just to flush your pee.
Multiply that by however many adults on the planet use a toilet every day and you get a very worrying scenario.
… Read more: https://www.techly.com.au/2017/12/06/worried-climate-change-something-start-peeing-shower/ The Techly article includes a Brazilian Government video which provides the same advice; I can’t fault their logic.
Material on this website is copyright © 2006-2017, by Anthony Watts, and may not be stored or archived separately, rebroadcast, or republished without written permission.
(Miriam O’Brien aka slandering “Sou” from Hotwhopper, that means you.)
For permission, contact us.

Climate Change & Global Warming

The moral and intellectual bankruptcy of the Republican Party

The moral and intellectual bankruptcy of the Republican Party

The parallels between the Republican Party positions on taxes and climate change are striking.
These Republican economic contradictions make no sense, but they’re familiar to those of us who follow climate change news.
On taxes, the Republican argument is cuts pay for themselves by stimulating economic growth and creating jobs.
But the economic literature is far from clear about whether tax cuts necessarily spur economic growth at all, let alone enough to pay for themselves.
Gary Cohn asks.#WSJCEOCouncil pic.twitter.com/TD2oAlN27S When presented with the nonpartisan congressional Joint Committee on Taxation analysis concluding the bill would increase the national debt by over $1tn even when accounting for associated economic growth, Republicans immediately rejected the results.
Starting with the brief rise of the Tea Party in 2010, that all changed, and the intellectual rot of the GOP has accelerated under President Trump.
At the time, 55% of Americans including 75% of Republicans reported watching Fox News.
In fact, the entire Republican case for their tax plan was based on lies.
Money and power – the root of all evil The Republican tax plan and the party’s obstruction of climate policies are nevertheless both unpopular positions.
Just 25% of Americans support the tax plan, though that includes 60% of Republican voters.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending December 1, 2017

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending December 1, 2017

This week began with an extraordinary call for direct action against oil pipelines (non-violent sabotage) published on the opinion page

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