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Organic Living

Fatbergs: A Sewer Menace You Might Be Helping Create

Fatbergs: A Sewer Menace You Might Be Helping Create

Fast-forward several years and now I’m sitting here wondering how many fatbergs I’ve helped create in my cities’ sewers.
When that oil or grease goes down the drain, it begins to combine with all the other oil and grease floating around in the sewer.
As scientists have studied these fatbergs, they’ve discovered one reason they can grow so large is the calcium in the concrete-lined sewers.
A 15-ton fatberg that had nearly sealed off the sewer.
The removal of these fatbergs from city sewers can cost an astounding amount.
Fighting Fatbergs Fatbergs have been a bigger issue in some European countries than in the United States due to various regulations.
Instead, collect your oil and grease until you have a fair amount you’d like to recycle.
Once your container is filled, use the Earth911 Recycling Search to find a local recycling option in your area.
If that doesn’t work, seal the container and dispose of it with your normal garbage.
Can Wet Wipes Be Recycled?

Organic Living

Best Curb Appeal 2017: Katharine Webster’s San Francisco Street Corner

Best Curb Appeal 2017: Katharine Webster’s San Francisco Street Corner

Best Curb Appeal 2017: Katharine Webster’s San Francisco Street Corner.
The winner of the 2017 Gardenista Considered Design Awards Best Curb Appeal project is Katharine Webster Landscape Architect for her Lush and Urban landscape in San Francisco.
A: To create a pleasing corner garden and curb appeal for our client.
Not only did we work with existing plant material to recycle what plants we could, we also dealt with issues of drought and differing microclimates within the corner garden.
Four, we varied height and texture in the garden to make the garden not feel horizontal—the garden needed to tie into the exposed vertical feel of the corner.
Q: What are your favorite features of the project?
It is very comforting and “gardenesque.” The combination of textures complement one another quite well.
The wife wanted more of a Mediterranean look so she got to select the sunny side of the palette, whereas the husband liked the burgundy shades and the shade-loving plants.
A: We reused existing plants that we could and which made sense with the design.
Q: Which garden designers, gardeners, landscape architects do you admire?

Conservation & Sustainability

The Stream Whisperer: “Thinking Like Water” Restores Sage Grouse Habitat

The Stream Whisperer: “Thinking Like Water” Restores Sage Grouse Habitat

Bill Zeedyk teaches Westerners how to “think like water” to restore wet habitat in the sagebrush desert People in the Gunnison Basin of Colorado call Bill Zeedyk the stream whisperer.
Sage grouse hens and their broods rely on the “green groceries”—protein-rich insects and forbs—found near springs, wet meadows, streamsides, and other wet places to feed the growing chicks during late summer and early fall.
“Follow me, and I’ll show you how we did it.” Simple Restoration Structures Zeedyk took us to a series of structures created out of nearby rocks and dirt.
Since 2012, the group has installed 1,112 simple restoration structures, restoring 21 miles of habitat across eight watersheds.
Chapman located stream reaches that were “very green” during wet years, but didn’t “green up” at all during drought years.
This helped the group focus restoration in places where keeping more water on the landscape would “give the birds a leg up” during difficult climactic years.
A Different Dance Part of the motivation behind restoring wet meadows in the Gunnison Basin was the fact that access to mesic habitat is a limiting factor in the life cycle of Gunnison sage-grouse.
“Their neighbors notice the difference and want to join in, too.” Typically, most restoration sites begin to show a significant response around three years after installing the structures.
It keeps water on my land, and keeps water in the basin.” Liz With represents the Natural Resources Conservation Service on the Gunnison Climate Working Group.
Gunnison Project At A Glance Gunnison Basin covers 5 million acres and 3 counties Landowners: U.S. Forest Service (51%), Bureau of Land Management (24%), private owners (15%), National Park Service (2%) Installed 1,112 wet meadow restoration structures since 2012 Restored sites along 21 stream miles in 8 watersheds Supports 350 species, including elk, mule deer, Gunnison sage-grouse and 23,000 people Partners: BIO-Logic Inc, Bird Conservancy of the Rockies, Bureau of Land Management, Colorado Natural Heritage Program, Colorado Parks and Wildilfe, Great Outdoors Colorado, Gunnison Conservation District, Gunnison County, National Park Service, Terra Foundation, The Nature Conservancy, Upper Gunnison River Water Conservancy District, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, U.S. Forest Service, Western Colorado Conservation Corps, Western State Colorado University, Western Water Assessment at University of Colorado, Wildlands Restoration Volunteers, Wildlife Conservation Society, Zeedyk Ecological Consulting Brianna Randall is a freelance writer and conservation junkie based in Missoula, Montana.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Sheep hunted before domestication in the Middle East.

Sheep hunted before domestication in the Middle East.

Sheep hunted before domestication in the Middle East.. Wild sheep are almost as difficult to classify as domestic animals, which have complicated admixtures of various species.
The mix in the mouflon is more complex still, as it is one of the ancestors of the domestic sheep Ovis aries.
The wild Ovis orientalis varieties still inhabit Eurasian habitats from which they were domesticated thousands of years ago.
em> This animal has now been found as far south as the Late Pleistocene (9,500 -14,500 years ago) sites such as those of the Middle Eastern Natufians in Jordan.
In Iran hybrids between wild sheep species have been found, showing up the distribution of these animals around the Fertile Crescent.
The authors of this paper attest to this in their lengthy descriptions of bone analysis!
The Royal Society journal, Open Science, publish it today.
These food resources for early peoples of the area give us important information on diet but also reveal just how many could have been domesticated for the first time.
Domestic dogs were already discovered here.
The authors claim that this Black Desert environment was a marginal area where resourceful humans could exploit many different animals and possibly plants.

Energy

17.6 million Americans live close to active oil and gas (and fracking) wells

17.6 million Americans live close to active oil and gas (and fracking) wells

17.6 million Americans live close to active oil and gas (and fracking) wells.
Oakland, Calif. – An estimated 17.6 million Americans live within one mile of an active oil or gas well, according to a study published today (August 23), in Environmental Health Perspectives, a peer-reviewed journal published by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.
The study, by researchers at PSE Healthy Energy, a nonprofit research institute; the University of California, Berkeley; and Harvey Mudd College, is the first peer-reviewed nationwide measurement of the number of people living in close proximity to actively producing oil and gas wells.
Residential proximity to these operations has also been associated with adverse birth outcomes, including pre-term birth, lower birth weight, neural tube defects and congenital heart defects.
But only a few peer-reviewed studies quantifying populations in proximity to these operations have been published, and those studies do not tie pollution emissions to specific types of oil and gas development operations. “Our study was specifically designed to determine how many Americans have increased health risks from potential exposure to pollutants emitted from oil and gas development,” said Eliza Czolowski, a research associate at PSE and lead author on the study.
Oklahoma was close behind, at 47 percent of residents living near active wells.
Texas had the highest number of residents — 4.5 million — living near active wells.
Many air pollutants, including benzene, formaldehyde and particulate matter, are emitted from both conventional and unconventional operations because they are co-produced with oil and gas, not specifically because a well is hydraulically fractured, Czolowski explained.
by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.

Oceans

We don’t know jack about the deep sea

We don’t know jack about the deep sea

And although the current amount of sampling and exploration of this great environment is without precedent, much of the deep sea remains unexplored.
How much of the deep sea you ask?
To derive an exact answer, we would need to know of every single sample of every deep-sea expedition taken plus all the submersible and ROV dives and how much area they covered.
Of course this is extremely unreasonable but I find myself with some free time and interest so an exercise in estimation… ROVS and Submersibles Total Number of ROVS and Submersibles 20 Total Number of Operational Years 30 Total Number of Dives Per Day 1 Total Number of Lifetime Dives 153,600 Total Distance Covered in Each Dive (km) 1 Effective Viewing Distance (m) 10 Area Covered Per Dive (km2) 0.01 Total Area Covered by ROV and Submersibles (km2) 1,536 Trawls and Sledges Average Trawl Distance (km) 1 Average Trawl Opening (m) 5 Total Area Sampled Per Trawl (km2) 0.005 Number of Total Trawls 20,000 Total Area Covered by Trawls and Sledges 100 Cores Core Size (m2) 1 Total Number of Cores 20,000 Total Area Covered by Cores (km2) 0.02 Benthic Landers Total Number of Benthic Landers 200 Total Visual Field (km2) 1 Total Area Covered by Landers (km2) 200 Total Area of Deep Sea Sampled (km2) 18,366.02 Area of Deep Sea (km2) 106,200,000 Percentage of Deep-Sea Area Covered 0.0017% 0.0017% is actually a ridiculously high estimate.
Perhaps more importantly, the assumption that each of the above samples/dives were taken in a unique location is unlikely has ROV’s/submersibles dives frequently return to specific sites.
So the answer is much less than 1/1000 percent of the total deep sea.
The total number of papers they found?
Just 77 on a mere 115 species.
OBIS is the scientific communities attempt at a stockpile of all the location data ever collected for any marine species.
Webb and colleagues findings echo that of Taylor and Roterman and my own, the deep ocean is poorly explored.

Alternative Energy

Court Rules FERC Failed to Adequately Review Environmental Impacts of Sabal Trail Pipeline

Court Rules FERC Failed to Adequately Review Environmental Impacts of Sabal Trail Pipeline

Court Rules FERC Failed to Adequately Review Environmental Impacts of Sabal Trail Pipeline.
The U.S. District Court of Appeals ruled 2-1 Tuesday saying that the Federal Environmental Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) failed to adequately review the environmental impacts of the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of the fracked gas Sabal Trail pipeline, which runs more than 500 miles through Alabama, Georgia and Florida. “Today, the D.C.
Circuit rejected FERC’s excuses for refusing to fully consider the effects of this dirty and dangerous pipeline,” said Sierra Club staff attorney Elly Benson. “Even though this pipeline is intended to deliver fracked gas to Florida power plants, FERC maintained that it could ignore the greenhouse gas pollution from burning the gas.
For too long, FERC has abandoned its responsibility to consider the public health and environmental impacts of its actions, including climate change.
Today’s decision requires FERC to fulfill its duties to the public, rather than merely serve as a rubber stamp for corporate polluters’ attempts to construct dangerous and unnecessary fracked gas pipelines.”
The judges declared that the environmental impact statement for the Southeast Market Pipelines Project was required to either quantify the impact of GHG resulting from burning the fracked gas transported by the pipeline or explain why it failed to do so. “Floridians, unlike FERC, have been far too aware of the dangers of this fracked gas project since its inception, and that’s why so many of us have spoken out against it,” said Sierra Club Florida director Frank Jackalone. “That fear was manifested when this project began leaking into our communities the other week, and it’s why a thorough review of this pipeline will show that it must be—and should have been—rejected.”

Energy

Economy-Wide Gains, 9.5 Billion Tons HFC Emissions At Risk From U.S. Court of Appeals Ruling

Economy-Wide Gains, 9.5 Billion Tons HFC Emissions At Risk From U.S. Court of Appeals Ruling

Economy-Wide Gains, 9.5 Billion Tons HFC Emissions At Risk From U.S. Court of Appeals Ruling.
With its ruling, the U.S. Court of Appeals dealt a blow to the Obama Administration’s climate legacy as well as the current Trump Administration, which had supported the regulation upon the urging of U.S. chemical companies Honeywell International Inc. and The Chemours Co.
Domestic HFCs Could Remain High Under Ruling The 2015 EPA regulation updating the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program would have significantly reduced the use of HFCs with high global warming potential in certain applications such as air conditioners, refrigerators, foams, and aerosols, over the next five to ten years.
Honeywell and Chemours, two large US chemicals companies that make HFC substitutes, have pushed for an HFC phase down for years and supported the EPA’s decision during litigation.
Global HFC Reductions Also At Risk The court’s decision hinged upon whether EPA could use the Clean Air Act to phase out certain HFCs, and unfortunately, the impact of that decision could extend beyond the reductions required under SNAP by hindering further HFC reductions under the Kigali Amendment.
Under Kigali, HFC use in the U.S. is required to decrease 85% from 2019-2036 by phasing down the use of all major HFCs in air conditioners, refrigerators, aerosols, foams, solvents, and fire protection chemicals.
If the U.S. were able to implement Kigali as planned, HFC emissions would fall nearly 90% by 2050, or nearly 500 MMT of carbon dioxide per year, equal to 5-10% of total forecast U.S. emissions in 2050.
Through 2050, U.S. reductions under the Kigali Amendment would total nearly 9.5 billion metric tons, or about one and a half years’ of total U.S. emissions.
Despite Setback, Several Promising Avenues for HFC Reduction Beyond the climate change concerns, the Court of Appeals decision could have wide-ranging business implications, and will likely lead to a corporate-led appeal of the ruling.
Even if the court’s current ruling stands, Congress could take action by passing legislation that would allow EPA to regulate HFCs.

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LATEST FROMConservation & Sustainability

Conservation & Sustainability

The Stream Whisperer: “Thinking Like Water” Restores Sage Grouse Habitat

The Stream Whisperer: “Thinking Like Water” Restores Sage Grouse Habitat

Bill Zeedyk teaches Westerners how to “think like water” to restore wet habitat in the sagebrush desert People in the Gunnison Basin of Colorado call Bill Zeedyk the stream whisperer.
Sage grouse hens and their broods rely on the “green groceries”—protein-rich insects and forbs—found near springs, wet meadows, streamsides, and other wet places to feed the growing chicks during late summer and early fall.
“Follow me, and I’ll show you how we did it.” Simple Restoration Structures Zeedyk took us to a series of structures created out of nearby rocks and dirt.
Since 2012, the group has installed 1,112 simple restoration structures, restoring 21 miles of habitat across eight watersheds.
Chapman located stream reaches that were “very green” during wet years, but didn’t “green up” at all during drought years.
This helped the group focus restoration in places where keeping more water on the landscape would “give the birds a leg up” during difficult climactic years.
A Different Dance Part of the motivation behind restoring wet meadows in the Gunnison Basin was the fact that access to mesic habitat is a limiting factor in the life cycle of Gunnison sage-grouse.
“Their neighbors notice the difference and want to join in, too.” Typically, most restoration sites begin to show a significant response around three years after installing the structures.
It keeps water on my land, and keeps water in the basin.” Liz With represents the Natural Resources Conservation Service on the Gunnison Climate Working Group.
Gunnison Project At A Glance Gunnison Basin covers 5 million acres and 3 counties Landowners: U.S. Forest Service (51%), Bureau of Land Management (24%), private owners (15%), National Park Service (2%) Installed 1,112 wet meadow restoration structures since 2012 Restored sites along 21 stream miles in 8 watersheds Supports 350 species, including elk, mule deer, Gunnison sage-grouse and 23,000 people Partners: BIO-Logic Inc, Bird Conservancy of the Rockies, Bureau of Land Management, Colorado Natural Heritage Program, Colorado Parks and Wildilfe, Great Outdoors Colorado, Gunnison Conservation District, Gunnison County, National Park Service, Terra Foundation, The Nature Conservancy, Upper Gunnison River Water Conservancy District, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, U.S. Forest Service, Western Colorado Conservation Corps, Western State Colorado University, Western Water Assessment at University of Colorado, Wildlands Restoration Volunteers, Wildlife Conservation Society, Zeedyk Ecological Consulting Brianna Randall is a freelance writer and conservation junkie based in Missoula, Montana.

Conservation & Sustainability

The Remarkable Story of How the Bison Returned to Europe

The Remarkable Story of How the Bison Returned to Europe

But yes, there are bison in Europe.
A more viable population survived in Poland’s Białowieża Forest, a long-time protected reserve.
Only nine animals remained.
It’s been published every year since, and documents every living wisent.
The Białowieża Forest remained a viable reserve: large and undeveloped, it was one of the few areas of “wilderness” in Europe.
Rewilding – the return of large, native wildlife to restored and connected wild spaces – is a controversial idea in North America.
Europe, with a large human population and little wilderness, may seem an unlikely bet for rewilding.
Like bison.
Much as American bison have played a role in grassland management on Nature Conservancy preserves in North America, European bison are now shaping forests and open areas in Germany, France, Spain and other countries.
But it’s important to keep in mind that Białowieża’s herd consisted of animals forced into the last remaining wilderness to survive.

Conservation & Sustainability

Day of doom for national monuments is approaching

Day of doom for national monuments is approaching

Through grassroots activism, Willis and his conservationist allies have won the support of two US presidents.
In 2000, Bill Clinton created the roughly 52,000-acre Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, proclaiming it an “ecological wonderland”.
The debate over Cascade-Siskiyou presents a snapshot of the cultural and economic conflict that so often characterizes public land management in the American West.
The expansion would prohibit most commercial timber production on more than 45,000 acres of southwestern Oregon land.
The governments of all three counties containing the monument, as well as seven Oregon state legislators and two California members of Congress, also were against it.
The law declares that these lands are to be managed for “permanent forest production” to provide timber, protect watersheds and contribute to local economic stability.
“And in a way I feel like this is an attack on a culture, a culture of people that has been here for more than 150 years.” Diarmuid McGuire, one of the Green Springs Inn’s proprietors, says the monument has helped business and “put us on the map”.
“It is a culture war, really, and when you organize a political rally around it, you get the anti-monument people, you get the gun people … and then you get the anti-government militia mixed in, and we had them all here across the street.” He points to his neighbor’s property across the street, displaying a sign in block letters: “NO MONUMENT OUR LAND OUR VOICE”.
Steve Pedery of Oregon Wild says the forest products industry and its allies are trying to return Oregon to some long-vanished golden era of timber riches.
In February and March, conservation groups like Oregon Wild, Willis’ Soda Mountain Wilderness Council and some of their collaborators, fearing that the Trump administration might settle with the timber industry, lawyered up and intervened in the court cases in an attempt to defend the monument.

Conservation & Sustainability

Melting Arctic Ice is Changing Whale Migration. How One Choice We Make Every Day Can Help

Melting Arctic Ice is Changing Whale Migration. How One Choice We Make Every Day Can Help

Melting Arctic Ice is Changing Whale Migration.
It seems that every day brings a new discovery regarding the impacts of climate change on our planet.
As ice disappears in the Arctic Circle, a passage is opening up where marine animals can move between the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans.
Since the 1970s, Arctic sea ice has declined by 14 percent.
Whales On the Move The impact of climate change on Arctic sea ice has been pretty well documented over the last few years.
A study released in the Marine Biodiversity Records the following year acknowledges that the chance that such an animal could go unnoticed by researchers for hundreds of years is pretty unlikely, and this animal most likely used the melting Northwest Passage to make its journey from the Pacific.
Gray whales aren’t the only species of whale to show peculiar behavior changes as the result of melting Arctic sea ice.
Bowhead whales make their home in the Arctic Circle all year.
The Take-Home Message The fact that climate change is altering the habitats of animals not just in the Arctic, but all over the world is reason to be concerned.
The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) estimates that livestock production is responsible for 14.5 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions, while other organizations like the Worldwatch Institute have estimated it could be as much as 51 percent.

Conservation & Sustainability

4 Foods That Are Eating the World’s Forests And How to Choose Better

4 Foods That Are Eating the World’s Forests And How to Choose Better

When we think about agriculture and the process of growing and producing food, the image usually includes lush, green fields, fertile soil, and nature working in harmony to create the things we like to eat.
So take a look at these common foods that are driving deforestation and consider the downstream impact that your diet might be having on the planet.
While it might appear to be an unassuming vegetable oil, palm oil is actually responsible for mass deforestation across Indonesia, Malaysia and now Africa as well.
Nearly 90 percent of their native habitat has been lost to palm plantations.
Luckily, as consumers, we can help to slow the damage being done to the planet and the orangutan species by removing palm oil from our diets.
Coffee You know how you can’t make it through the morning without at least three cups of coffee?
Now think about how many native forest trees and plants need to be replaced to grow 18 coffee trees for you and millions of other coffee drinkers of the world, yikes!
If your coffee is “shade-grown” that means that it was grown within the forest itself and is less likely to have caused deforestation of other native plants.
Cocoa Chocolate or cocoa, is another fan favorite, that tragically is driving deforestation across the world.
As the demand for meat, dairy and eggs increases across the world, more land is needed to cultivate crops that will become livestock feed, thus fueling deforestation.

Conservation & Sustainability

The buzz on climate change: It’s bad for bees

The buzz on climate change: It’s bad for bees

The buzz on climate change: It’s bad for bees.
Did you eat an apple today or drink coffee this morning?
Thank a bee.
But the world’s honeybees are in steep decline, with 10 million hives disappearing just in the past three years.
Not having honey is the least of our problems.
While scientists aren’t clear on exactly what factors are behind bees’ decline, what is known is that climate change is also making life harder for bees.
In South Africa, CI is keeping important pollinator habitat intact and helping to ensure future food security there.
Even a small mismatch of three to six days could negatively affect bees’ health, making them less likely to reproduce and less resistant to predators and parasites.
It has since spread to Europe and the U.S., causing shorter lifespans and colony collapse.
A recent study found that lower temperatures were associated with lower prevalence of the parasite, indicating that higher temperatures as a result of climate change could result in more bees infected with Nosema ceranae.

LATEST FROMClimate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change & Global Warming

Sheep hunted before domestication in the Middle East.

Sheep hunted before domestication in the Middle East.

Sheep hunted before domestication in the Middle East.. Wild sheep are almost as difficult to classify as domestic animals, which have complicated admixtures of various species.
The mix in the mouflon is more complex still, as it is one of the ancestors of the domestic sheep Ovis aries.
The wild Ovis orientalis varieties still inhabit Eurasian habitats from which they were domesticated thousands of years ago.
em> This animal has now been found as far south as the Late Pleistocene (9,500 -14,500 years ago) sites such as those of the Middle Eastern Natufians in Jordan.
In Iran hybrids between wild sheep species have been found, showing up the distribution of these animals around the Fertile Crescent.
The authors of this paper attest to this in their lengthy descriptions of bone analysis!
The Royal Society journal, Open Science, publish it today.
These food resources for early peoples of the area give us important information on diet but also reveal just how many could have been domesticated for the first time.
Domestic dogs were already discovered here.
The authors claim that this Black Desert environment was a marginal area where resourceful humans could exploit many different animals and possibly plants.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Right kind of collaboration is key to solving environmental problems

Right kind of collaboration is key to solving environmental problems

Right kind of collaboration is key to solving environmental problems.
“Collaborative governance is often highlighted as a solution to different environmental problems.
One way to delve into these questions has been to study how different collaborative initiatives have engaged different actors and how these actors have chosen to work with each other.
Through studying these collaborative networks we develop a better understanding of how actors, both as a group and as individuals, act when confronted with different environmental problems.
“Our research shows that the ability to solve environmental problems is in part connected to the way these networks are structured – the patterns of collaboration between actors”, says Örjan Bodin.
This could mean that two actors who cooperate with the same, third actor should also cooperate directly with each other, forming a triangle of cooperation.
If it’s temporary it can be more effective to have a cooperative network with a clearly chosen coordinator or leader to hold it together”, says Örjan Bodin.
From Eurkealert Public Release: 1-Aug-2017 FSU research: Chemical weathering could alleviate some climate change effects Florida State University TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — There could be some good news on the horizon as scientists try to understand the effects and processes related to climate change.
Nintendo Switch “Explorations” are X’s “early-stage… Energy From The Daily Caller Chris White 9:57 PM 07/31/2017 Australian scientists at the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) ordered a review of temperature recording instruments after the government agency was caught tampering with temperature logs in several locations.
Holden closure will help Energy Market Operator manage SA’s blackout risk, report finds By political reporter Nick Harmsen Part of the soon-to-be vacated… Guest essay by Eric Worrall Building an energy producing nuclear fusion reactor remains elusive, but some companies are re-considering an old idea – combining nuclear fusion with nuclear fission in a single reactor, to overcome the disadvantages of both.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Island states need better data to manage climate losses

Island states need better data to manage climate losses

Island states need better data to manage climate losses.
Impacts from climate change are already occurring.
Six of the seven interviewees identified tropical storms as being the source of the majority of existing loss and damage, in most cases naming specific storms and levels of financial damages experienced.
The majority of INDCs similarly identified damages due to extreme events and often included associated costs.
These are ongoing costs” – Caribbean respondent The lack of financial costing associated with loss and damage from slow-onset events was attributed to the absence of holistic methodologies for determining these impacts.
SIDS often have existing disaster assessment methodologies and are accustomed to assessing post-storm damages and compiling financial costs.
“We’re a very reactive society at the moment, so we respond to events” – Caribbean respondent The lack of methodologies for slow-onset event loss and damage assessment is further hindered by a lack of data.
Some of it has been collected in [the capital] but in outer islands we’re just starting to collect data on climate change impacts.
However, most SIDS lack specific policies or mechanisms that address loss and damage.
Lastly, SIDS have few policies in place to address loss and damage, leading to an ad hoc approach that is inefficient in assessing and managing these impacts.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change Week in Review: Week Ending August 18, 2017

Climate Change Week in Review: Week Ending August 18, 2017

Two of the stories on our list today involve newly released scientific studies on climate issues. One offers good news,

Climate Change & Global Warming

Climate Science Double-Speak

In 2015, the hottest year on record, the temperature was about 1.8 degrees F (1 degree C) warmer than the 1951–1980 base period.” Quick minds see immediately that 1.8°F warmer than 57.2°F is actually 59°F [or 15° C] which they simply could have said.
It may seem odd to the scientifically-minded that Global Average Temperature is measured and calculated to the claimed precision of hundredths of a degree Celsius without first having an agreed upon definition for what is being measured.
A brief of the concept: “An operational definition, when applied to data collection, is a clear, concise detailed definition of a measure.
Operational definitions should therefore be made before the collection of data begins.” Nonetheless, after having informed the world that there is no agreed upon definition for Global Average Temperature, UCAR assures us that: “The important point is that the trends that emerge from year to year and decade to decade are remarkably similar—more so than the averages themselves.
This is why global warming is usually described in terms of anomalies (variations above and below the average for a baseline set of years) rather than in absolute temperature.” In fact, the annual anomalies themselves differ one-from-another by > 0.49°C — an amount just slightly smaller than the whole reported temperature anomaly from 1987 to date (a 30-year climate period).
Luckily (literally, apparently) the important point is that although all the groups get different answers to the Global Average Surface Temperature question – we suppose it’s because of that lack of an agreed upon definition of what they are calculating — the trends they find are “remarkably similar”.
Even less reassuring is being told that the trends are “more [remarkably similar] … than the averages themselves.” And finally, because there is no agreed upon definition of Global Average Temperature and the results for the undefined metric from varying groups are less [remarkably] similar than the trends; even the calculated anomalies themselves from the different groups are as far apart from one another as the entire claimed temperature rise over the last 30 year climatic period.
Certainly a far cry from settled science — both parts by the way — not settled — and [some of it] not solid science.
Nintendo Switch “Explorations” are X’s “early-stage… Energy From The Daily Caller Chris White 9:57 PM 07/31/2017 Australian scientists at the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) ordered a review of temperature recording instruments after the government agency was caught tampering with temperature logs in several locations.
Holden closure will help Energy Market Operator manage SA’s blackout risk, report finds By political reporter Nick Harmsen Part of the soon-to-be vacated… Guest essay by Eric Worrall Building an energy producing nuclear fusion reactor remains elusive, but some companies are re-considering an old idea – combining nuclear fusion with nuclear fission in a single reactor, to overcome the disadvantages of both.

Climate Change & Global Warming

He’s Baaaaaaaccckkk! (Oy)

He’s Baaaaaaaccckkk! (Oy)

He’s Baaaaaaaccckkk!
(Oy).
Pen Hadow, of the 2009 Caitlin Arctic Expedition is on the loose again!
Here’s the link to the BBC story which is mostly a short video.
Here is a quote: British explorer Pen Hadow and his crew have set sail from Alaska, in an attempt to become the first people ever to sail to the North Pole.
Can the Catlin Arctic Survey Team Cover 683 km in the Next 21 Days?
Quote of the week #4 Catlin Arctic Ice Survey first report offers no original drilling data, but anecdotally confirms satellite measurement Catlin Arctic Ice Survey: paid advertising of results before they are even off the ice!
The Guardian Relocates The North Pole By 500km The Top Ten Reasons why I think Catlin Arctic Ice Survey data can’t be trusted From Eurkealert Public Release: 1-Aug-2017 FSU research: Chemical weathering could alleviate some climate change effects Florida State University TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — There could be some good news on the horizon as scientists try to understand the effects and processes related to climate change.
31st 2017 9:10 am PT @technacity While clean energy is not a new area for Alphabet’s X, the moonshot division has previously only focused on energy creation.
Holden closure will help Energy Market Operator manage SA’s blackout risk, report finds By political reporter Nick Harmsen Part of the soon-to-be vacated… Guest essay by Eric Worrall Building an energy producing nuclear fusion reactor remains elusive, but some companies are re-considering an old idea – combining nuclear fusion with nuclear fission in a single reactor, to overcome the disadvantages of both.

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