Latest

Conservation & Sustainability

Days After Irma’s Destruction, Caribbean Residents Now Face Hurricane Maria

Days After Irma’s Destruction, Caribbean Residents Now Face Hurricane Maria

. Puerto Rico, along with both the U.S. Virgin Islands and the British Virgin Islands, are bracing for a hit from Maria on Wednesday night, according to the National Hurricane Center’s forecast. As of Monday afternoon, the storm was packing 130 mph winds and set to bring storm conditions to Dominica, Guadeloupe and Martinique later at night.
The threat of destructive rain ― predicted to be as high as 20 inches in some areas ― severe winds and storm surge come just as many who live in the Caribbean attempt to get back on their feet after Irma, which claimed at least three lives in Puerto Rico, at least four in the British Virgin Islands, and at least three in the U.S. Virgin Islands, where electricity may not be restored for months.
She had moved there with her husband 46 years ago and lost everything ― “a lifetime of labor and love” ― to Irma’s destruction.
Irma largely spared Puerto Rico but still knocked out power for about a million residents, which is simultaneously grappling with its worst economic crisis in modern history and has been in a near-continuous recession for the last 10 years.
As Maria neared, Rosselló said that about 85 percent of customers in and around San Juan, the territory’s capital, were still without electricity because of Irma.
National Weather Service meteorologist Jessie Smith told Florida Today that it never hurts to be prepared.

Alternative Energy

America Is Doubling Down on Climate Progress

America Is Doubling Down on Climate Progress

As Climate Week begins in New York, a lot of the world is asking Americans, “How are you doing at making climate progress with a climate denying president?”
This progress was led by the utility sector, where efficiency, renewables and natural were replacing coal so fast that power sector carbon was down 25 percent.
But Trump’s promise to have America withdraw from the Paris climate agreement has sparked a stunning wave of climate leadership from U.S. cities, states and businesses, a wave that is still building, but by the time it crests may more than make up for Trump’s stubborn foot-dragging.
Now the Sierra Club has estimated that additional coal plants whose retirement have already been announced would cut emissions about 160 million tons.
California is also on the verge of requiring 100 percent of its power to come from renewables.
Maryland just established a 25 percent renewable power goal, overriding the veto of a Republican governor.
The fifteen “early adaptor” states in the Climate Alliance will report this week that they are already on track to reduce their 2025 emissions by 24 to 29 percent.
Whether their state legislatures and governors are leading on climate or not, America’s cities, where most of our climate pollution originates, are embracing a decarbonized future.
And global firms will impact the U.S. climate footprint.
And the decarbonization of the American economy—the real economy, not the fake news economy—shows it’s still true.

Conservation & Sustainability

In case you missed it: 3 big stories from our world, Climate Week edition

In case you missed it: 3 big stories from our world, Climate Week edition

Editor’s note: News about conservation and the environment is made every day, but some of it can fly under the radar.
Asia’s glaciers to shrink by a third by 2100, threatening water supply of millions Himalayan glaciers — a crucial source of fresh water for millions of people in South Asia and China — will lose up to a third of their mass, a study found.
The story: The Asian high mountains, the new study said, were already warming more rapidly than the global average, Agence France Presse reported Wednesday in The Guardian.
The bad news: This is a best-case scenario, as it assumes that global average temperature rise can be capped at 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.
The big picture: While much of the conservation world’s attention is focused on protecting forests, wetlands and coral reefs, mountains are sometimes taken for granted — yet climate change could crumble their ability to support life as we know it.
Mountains’ contributions to fresh water, energy and biodiversity are at risk in a changing climate.
The story: Much of the food we grow has been growing less nutritious over the years: A 2004 study of fruits and vegetables found that nutrients had declined significantly since 1950.
No one has been able to say exactly why, but now, a handful of scientists are beginning to suspect that the atmosphere itself — i.e. higher concentrations of carbon dioxide in the air — may be changing the food we eat.
Unlike in 2005, when the U.S. was racked by Katrina, Rita and Wilma, scientists are now more willing to link factors like worsened storm surge flooding and hurricane rainfall to climate change, Mooney writes.
Want to read more stories like this?

Wellness

8 Reminders About Your Body Image, Burning Calories, and True Health.

8 Reminders About Your Body Image, Burning Calories, and True Health.

I’ll hear that lifting and yoga aren’t good enough workouts because they don’t burn enough calories.
The scale dictated my happiness each day.
I turned down events with friends because the food wasn’t “healthy” enough, and spent way too much mental energy thinking about what my body looked like.
8 reminders about your body image, burning calories, and true health: 1.
You are so much more than how your body looks.
Being thinner doesn’t make you healthier, and you can’t change your bone structure by burning more calories.
The goal should not be to eat less, it should be to eat the amount that your body needs to function well and have good energy.
And some days you’ll eat a little more than you need, some times maybe less.
You don’t have to burn off everything you eat.
Cardio is great for heart health, but it isn’t the only exercise worth doing.

Conservation & Sustainability

California Close To Banning Pet Shop Sales Of Non-Rescue Cats, Dogs And Rabbits

California Close To Banning Pet Shop Sales Of Non-Rescue Cats, Dogs And Rabbits

California will become the first state to ban pet stores from selling cats, dogs or rabbits that don’t come from a shelter or rescue group if Gov.
Jerry Brown (D) signs the bill sent to him this week.
The Pet Rescue and Adoption Act, AB 485, passed the California State Senate with a 32-0 vote on Tuesday, NBC San Diego reports.
The governor has until Oct. 15 to sign the bill into law or veto it, the Bee notes.
Under the legislation, pet store owners that still wished to sell cats, dogs or rabbits would have to work with local animal shelters and rescue groups to do so.
First, it would prevent California pet stores from supporting breeding facilities that mass-produce animals, often in deplorable conditions.
Additionally, the legislation would promote the adoption of pets from animal shelters.
Last year, an estimated 1.5 million companion animals were euthanized in shelters in the United States, according to ASPCA data.
Dr. Gary Weitzman, president and CEO of the San Diego Humane Society, pointed out that the measure could also save taxpayer money.
Cambridge’s ordinance bans pet stores from selling any non-rescue animals other than fish — meaning that besides dogs and cats, it also covers everything from birds to snakes to small animals like mice, rats and hamsters.

Conservation & Sustainability

Understanding Today’s Climate Politics

Understanding Today’s Climate Politics

Understanding Today’s Climate Politics.
More than a decade later, we know that climate change is literally baked into the atmosphere and while we continue the transition to a renewable resource-based economy, we must also address the impact of the global warming that has already taken place.
President Trump and his pals deny the importance of climate change, but they have inadvertently mobilized America’s businesses, states, cities and civil society to engage even more intensely in mitigating climate change and in building a renewable resource based economy.
The impacts of climate change are not immediate and are (still) largely in the future.
It was not a response to a model of damage that is coming, but a response to extreme weather events such as Katrina and Sandy that many experienced.
But understanding that the world is changing does not mean that people believe they should sacrifice their lifestyle to mitigate or adapt to global warming.
We are already seeing modifications of lifestyles with the development of the sharing economy.
And the business of ride sharing may take on some new forms.
By the middle of this century it will not be autos we consume, but “rides”.
We adapt our consumption patterns and they have the important impact of reducing environmental damage and mitigating climate change.

Wellness

This pumpkin spice protein pancake recipe from healthy chef Lily Kunin is a Saturday morning game-changer

This pumpkin spice protein pancake recipe from healthy chef Lily Kunin is a Saturday morning game-changer

This pumpkin spice protein pancake recipe from healthy chef Lily Kunin is a Saturday morning game-changer.
TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaque Font Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall Caps Reset restore all settings to the default valuesDone Close Modal Dialog End of dialog window.
When I first started cutting out gluten, my mind was hardwired to avoid anything that contained the word “wheat.” But then I discovered buckwheat, which is low on the glycemic scale and helps balance your blood sugar.
Plus, it’s high in protein and fiber, so it supports digestion and keeps you full and energized longer.
Because of its slightly nutty and cinnamon flavor, buckwheat is one of my favorite gluten-free flours for baking—it’s actually a seed, BTW.
I prefer a darker flour—buckwheat flours differ in color from light to dark, and the darker the color the stronger the taste, FYI—which makes the batter more fiber- and protein-rich.
Pumpkin Spice Pancakes Yields 10 servings Ingredients Pancakes 1 cup buckwheat flour 2 tsp pumpkin pie spice 1 tsp baking powder 1/2 tsp baking soda 1/4 tsp pink salt or sea salt 2 eggs (can sub with flax eggs to make vegan) 1/2 cup pumpkin puree 1 cup unsweetened almond milk 1 dash of pure vanilla 3 Tbsp coconut oil 1.
Combine the wet mixture with your dry ingredients until incorporated.
Spoon about 1/4 cup of the batter into the pan.
Plant-based cook and health coach Lily Kunin is the founder of Clean Food Dirty City and the author of the cookbook Good Clean Food.

Oceans

Marine Conservation Institute Takes a Stand to Support the Atlantic Goliath Grouper

Marine Conservation Institute Takes a Stand to Support the Atlantic Goliath Grouper

They typically remain solitary and live in deeper water[i] but, when spawning, goliath groupers can be seen in large aggregations off the Florida coast.
[iii] Now, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is considering changing its management strategy for the Atlantic goliath grouper.
[iv] Scientific population models analyzed by the Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR) in 2016, suggest that the relative stock abundance has been declining since 2012.
Fishing, even “limited take” fishing, would negatively impact this declining population.
These management changes come from local fishermen’s concern that allowing goliath grouper populations to increase would result in fewer fish and lobsters of commercial and recreational value.
[viii] Thus, re-opening the goliath grouper fishery could jeopardize their recovery and it is crucial that the FWC proceeds with caution.
When you combine continued habitat loss with mortality events and fishing, as suggested by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission, we are concerned that goliath grouper populations will suffer and decline.
Maintaining protections for the Atlantic goliath grouper supports the interests of Florida’s people, economy and wildlife.
http://www.divepbc.com/goliath-groupers-spot-8.html [iii] Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (2017).
Protect the critically endangered goliath grouper from killing in Florida.

advertisement click here for rates

LATEST FROMConservation & Sustainability

Conservation & Sustainability

Days After Irma’s Destruction, Caribbean Residents Now Face Hurricane Maria

Days After Irma’s Destruction, Caribbean Residents Now Face Hurricane Maria

. Puerto Rico, along with both the U.S. Virgin Islands and the British Virgin Islands, are bracing for a hit from Maria on Wednesday night, according to the National Hurricane Center’s forecast. As of Monday afternoon, the storm was packing 130 mph winds and set to bring storm conditions to Dominica, Guadeloupe and Martinique later at night.
The threat of destructive rain ― predicted to be as high as 20 inches in some areas ― severe winds and storm surge come just as many who live in the Caribbean attempt to get back on their feet after Irma, which claimed at least three lives in Puerto Rico, at least four in the British Virgin Islands, and at least three in the U.S. Virgin Islands, where electricity may not be restored for months.
She had moved there with her husband 46 years ago and lost everything ― “a lifetime of labor and love” ― to Irma’s destruction.
Irma largely spared Puerto Rico but still knocked out power for about a million residents, which is simultaneously grappling with its worst economic crisis in modern history and has been in a near-continuous recession for the last 10 years.
As Maria neared, Rosselló said that about 85 percent of customers in and around San Juan, the territory’s capital, were still without electricity because of Irma.
National Weather Service meteorologist Jessie Smith told Florida Today that it never hurts to be prepared.

Conservation & Sustainability

In case you missed it: 3 big stories from our world, Climate Week edition

In case you missed it: 3 big stories from our world, Climate Week edition

Editor’s note: News about conservation and the environment is made every day, but some of it can fly under the radar.
Asia’s glaciers to shrink by a third by 2100, threatening water supply of millions Himalayan glaciers — a crucial source of fresh water for millions of people in South Asia and China — will lose up to a third of their mass, a study found.
The story: The Asian high mountains, the new study said, were already warming more rapidly than the global average, Agence France Presse reported Wednesday in The Guardian.
The bad news: This is a best-case scenario, as it assumes that global average temperature rise can be capped at 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.
The big picture: While much of the conservation world’s attention is focused on protecting forests, wetlands and coral reefs, mountains are sometimes taken for granted — yet climate change could crumble their ability to support life as we know it.
Mountains’ contributions to fresh water, energy and biodiversity are at risk in a changing climate.
The story: Much of the food we grow has been growing less nutritious over the years: A 2004 study of fruits and vegetables found that nutrients had declined significantly since 1950.
No one has been able to say exactly why, but now, a handful of scientists are beginning to suspect that the atmosphere itself — i.e. higher concentrations of carbon dioxide in the air — may be changing the food we eat.
Unlike in 2005, when the U.S. was racked by Katrina, Rita and Wilma, scientists are now more willing to link factors like worsened storm surge flooding and hurricane rainfall to climate change, Mooney writes.
Want to read more stories like this?

Conservation & Sustainability

California Close To Banning Pet Shop Sales Of Non-Rescue Cats, Dogs And Rabbits

California Close To Banning Pet Shop Sales Of Non-Rescue Cats, Dogs And Rabbits

California will become the first state to ban pet stores from selling cats, dogs or rabbits that don’t come from a shelter or rescue group if Gov.
Jerry Brown (D) signs the bill sent to him this week.
The Pet Rescue and Adoption Act, AB 485, passed the California State Senate with a 32-0 vote on Tuesday, NBC San Diego reports.
The governor has until Oct. 15 to sign the bill into law or veto it, the Bee notes.
Under the legislation, pet store owners that still wished to sell cats, dogs or rabbits would have to work with local animal shelters and rescue groups to do so.
First, it would prevent California pet stores from supporting breeding facilities that mass-produce animals, often in deplorable conditions.
Additionally, the legislation would promote the adoption of pets from animal shelters.
Last year, an estimated 1.5 million companion animals were euthanized in shelters in the United States, according to ASPCA data.
Dr. Gary Weitzman, president and CEO of the San Diego Humane Society, pointed out that the measure could also save taxpayer money.
Cambridge’s ordinance bans pet stores from selling any non-rescue animals other than fish — meaning that besides dogs and cats, it also covers everything from birds to snakes to small animals like mice, rats and hamsters.

Conservation & Sustainability

Understanding Today’s Climate Politics

Understanding Today’s Climate Politics

Understanding Today’s Climate Politics.
More than a decade later, we know that climate change is literally baked into the atmosphere and while we continue the transition to a renewable resource-based economy, we must also address the impact of the global warming that has already taken place.
President Trump and his pals deny the importance of climate change, but they have inadvertently mobilized America’s businesses, states, cities and civil society to engage even more intensely in mitigating climate change and in building a renewable resource based economy.
The impacts of climate change are not immediate and are (still) largely in the future.
It was not a response to a model of damage that is coming, but a response to extreme weather events such as Katrina and Sandy that many experienced.
But understanding that the world is changing does not mean that people believe they should sacrifice their lifestyle to mitigate or adapt to global warming.
We are already seeing modifications of lifestyles with the development of the sharing economy.
And the business of ride sharing may take on some new forms.
By the middle of this century it will not be autos we consume, but “rides”.
We adapt our consumption patterns and they have the important impact of reducing environmental damage and mitigating climate change.

Conservation & Sustainability

Meet the People Who’ve Dedicated Their Lives to Protect the Last Ecosystem Where Rhinos, Orangutans, and Tigers Live

Meet the People Who’ve Dedicated Their Lives to Protect the Last Ecosystem Where Rhinos, Orangutans, and Tigers Live

Meet the People Who’ve Dedicated Their Lives to Protect the Last Ecosystem Where Rhinos, Orangutans, and Tigers Live.
Palm oil companies often destroy extensive areas of rainforest by igniting fires that kill and displace countless wild animals and cause serious health problems for local people.
The Leuser Ecosystem’s gradual transformation from lush, vibrant rainforest to sterile palm plantations has serious implications for the ecosystem’s indigenous animal species.
There is still much that needs to be done to restore the Leuser Ecosystem to its full glory, but dedicated Sumatran groups such as The Rangers of Tangkahan are determined to see it through.
The Rangers of Tangkahan are a group of forest rangers who regularly patrol the rainforest around the community of Tangkahan in North Sumatra.
Their tasks involve removing snares to ensure that wild animals cannot become caught in them, helping to reduce human-wildlife conflict, and working alongside forest edge communities to help them create alternative livelihood schemes.
They are the only patrol unit that specifically strives to protect the Leuser buffer zone of North Sumatra.
Two of the rangers can be seen removing a snare in this photograph.
You can support these amazing people by contributing to their vitally important Snare Removal in North Sumatra campaign on GoFundMe.
Alternatively, you can make a direct donation on the Rangers of Tangkahan website.

Conservation & Sustainability

Harvesting Earth’s Bounty

Harvesting Earth’s Bounty

Forest has been cleared from vast areas of land, some of which is cultivated to provide our food.
Our harvest of plants for food extends to uncultivated pasture and rangelands, which are used by grazing animals.
At the moment, we manage about 11% of the land surface for agriculture and 24% for grazing animals.
We are on a roll to manage more land as a response to feeding the unrelenting growth of the human population.
The growth enhancement is nearly all due to supplements that humans provide to agricultural ecosystems in the form of fertilizers, irrigation waters, pesticides, and cultivation.
The harvest of plant production by humans has been estimated repeatedly.
About 7.2 percent of the world’s photosynthetic output goes to food production, either directly or indirectly, such as the consumption of eggs, milk and meat from animals that are fed plant materials.
So, albeit rough, our best estimate of how much of the world’s plant productivity goes to feed seven billion humans is certainly less than a few percent, which we take from about 35% of the land that we manage for that purpose.
Our direct harvest of plants for food is rather small, but we disturb a vast area of land to provide that food.
What really matters is the plant productivity that is diverted from the other species that share the planet with us, and that seems to be about half of the Earth’s photosynthetic bounty.

LATEST FROMClimate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change & Global Warming

LSE Bob Ward: Hurricanes are President Trump’s Fault

LSE Bob Ward: Hurricanes are President Trump’s Fault

Irma and Harvey lay the costs of climate change denial at Trump’s door The president’s dismissal of scientific research is doing nothing to protect the livelihoods of ordinary Americans Bob Ward Sunday 10 September 2017 09.05 AEST As the US comes to terms with its second major weather disaster within a month, an important question is whether the devastation caused by hurricanes Harveyand Irma will convince Donald Trump and his administration of the reality of climate change.
Third, apart from strong winds and heavy rainfall, hurricanes cause damage through storm surges as their winds push seawater ahead of them.
Sea levels have been gradually rising globally, making storm surges bigger and deadlier.
Scientists are still not sure about the other ways in which climate change may be impacting hurricanes.
… Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/sep/10/hurricane-irma-harvey-climate-change-trump The biggest problem for alarmists like Bob is there is no upward trend in hurricane frequency or intensity.
(h/t Benny Peiser) … It is premature to conclude that human activities–and particularly greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming–have already had a detectable impact on Atlantic hurricane or global tropical cyclone activity.
What if we keep burning fossil fuels and putting more CO2 into the atmosphere?
Climate models have never been validated in any meaningful scientific sense – an issue which bothers some climate scientists so much, they argue that the definition of science itself must be changed, to accommodate climate models’ lack of scientific falsifiability.
Are climate models falsifiable?
In a new study, the Stanford team used the insect-inspired design to protect a fragile photovoltaic material… Guest essay by Eric Worrall A Californian judge ruled that President Trump’s administration acted illegally in suspending Obama era royalty hikes against resource projects on government land.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending September 8, 2017

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending September 8, 2017

  This is a big week for watery news: news about oceans, about the fish that swim in them and

Climate Change & Global Warming

Google’s search bias against conservative news sites has been quantified

Google’s search bias against conservative news sites has been quantified

Guest essay by Leo Goldstein A Method of Google Search Bias Quantification and Its Application in Climate Debate and General Political Discourse Abstract The percentage of domain traffic, referred by Google Search, net of brand searches (PGSTN), tends to be in or around the range 25%-30% for a broad class of web domains.
Thus, PGSTN can be used rigorously to detect and even quantify Google Search intentional bias.
Methods It is known that Google Search provides 25%-30% of the user’s traffic to an average website.
Nevertheless, the Google attitude toward a domain has been provisionally noted and color coded in the attached spreadsheet PGSTN-Domains.xlsx as follows: Whitelist / Green Light: >36% Normal: 20%-36% Grey Area: 12%-20% Blacklist: <=12% Most domains were expected (based on the cited SEO research) to have PGSTN in the 20%-36% range. Google Bias in Climate Debate The domains were selected mostly according to Alexa classification. There is a huge gap between PGSTN of realism domains (6.3% – 17.4%), and PGSTN of climate alarmism domains (23.5%-52.4%). Except for drroyspencer.com, all climate realism domains are blacklisted by Google (PGSTN is 6.3% – 11.0%). Its PGSTN = 44.5%. Google Bias in General Political Discourse To quantify Google general political bias, I selected top U.S. news and opinions sites by their ranking in Alexa, then added some lower ranking conservative sites based on my personal knowledge and/or Alexa suggestions. In a new study, the Stanford team used the insect-inspired design to protect a fragile photovoltaic material… Guest essay by Eric Worrall A Californian judge ruled that President Trump’s administration acted illegally in suspending Obama era royalty hikes against resource projects on government land.

Climate Change & Global Warming

International Space Station gets dramatic view of hurricane #Irma

International Space Station gets dramatic view of hurricane #Irma

International Space Station gets dramatic view of hurricane #Irma.
The International Space Station’s external cameras captured another dramatic view of Hurricane Irma as it made landfall in the Caribbean Sept. 6.
The powerful Category 5 storm with sustained winds of 185 mph made landfall on several islands while continuing on a westward track.
Irma is expected to bring severe wind and rain to several islands in the Caribbean over the next several days with the potential to impact the Florida peninsula by week’s end.
Guest essay by Eric Worrall As Hurricane Harvey survivors struggle with the aftermath, the cleanup, with power outages and portable generators, reporters far away in comfortable offices in New York think they have a solution to their problems; a new carbon tax.
We Don’t Deny Harvey, So Why Deny Climate Change?
Nicholas Kristof SEPT. 2,… Insect eyes inspire new solar cell design from Stanford Packing tiny solar cells together, like micro-lenses in the compound eye of an insect, could pave the way to a new generation of advanced photovoltaics, say Stanford University scientists.
In a new study, the Stanford team used the insect-inspired design to protect a fragile photovoltaic material… Guest essay by Eric Worrall A Californian judge ruled that President Trump’s administration acted illegally in suspending Obama era royalty hikes against resource projects on government land.
But given the rules will shortly be abolished, the rules will not be re-instated.
Court says feds broke the law when delaying new royalty rule By Laura Paskus…

Climate Change & Global Warming

Climate change threatens survival of Jordan River

Climate change threatens survival of Jordan River

Climate change threatens survival of Jordan River.
New research finds worsening droughts will sap the biblical waterway, which is already under pressure from agriculture and a growing population Hydrologists and climate scientists have just calculated the future of one of the world’s most celebrated waterways, the River Jordan.
Their conclusion is that the outlook is poor – and getting poorer.
If humans continue to burn fossil fuels at an ever-increasing rate, then rainfall will diminish by 30%, average temperatures will rise by 4.5°C, and the flow from the Jordan’s most important tributary could fall by 75%.
The frequency of droughts will increase threefold, to recur almost every year.
Climate Weekly: Sign up for your essential climate news update Scientists in California report in Science Advances journal that they took a look at future conditions for one of the world’s political hotspots, and focused on the problems for one state in the region.
Pressure on water supplies has been exacerbated by population growth, economic development, dramatic increases in irrigated farming, and abstraction of groundwater from the aquifers that once filled wells and topped up desert oases.
The Jordan is just one of the world’s 278 waterways that flow across national boundaries or that divide nations – that is, rivers that deliver water to more than one set of peoples.
Researchers have already identified future problems connected with the Nile, one of the other great rivers of biblical history.
The end of the Syrian civil war upstream could mean a return to farming and even more demand for water that would otherwise flow into the Jordan.

Climate Change & Global Warming

NYT: Lets Help Hurricane Harvey Survivors By Taxing Them

NYT: Lets Help Hurricane Harvey Survivors By Taxing Them

NYT: Lets Help Hurricane Harvey Survivors By Taxing Them.
Guest essay by Eric Worrall As Hurricane Harvey survivors struggle with the aftermath, the cleanup, with power outages and portable generators, reporters far away in comfortable offices in New York think they have a solution to their problems; a new carbon tax.
Nicholas Kristof SEPT. 2, 2017 Imagine that after the 9/11 attacks, the conversation had been limited to the tragedy in Lower Manhattan, the heroism of rescuers and the high heels of the visiting first lady — without addressing the risks of future terrorism.
That’s how we have viewed Hurricane Harvey in Houston, as a gripping human drama but without adequate discussion of how climate change increases risks of such cataclysms.
We can’t have an intelligent conversation about Harvey without also discussing climate change.
… Remember also that we in the rich world are the lucky ones.
We lose homes to climate change, but in much of the world families lose something far more precious: their babies.
An obvious first step is to embrace the Paris climate accord.
We also must adapt to a new normal — and that’s something Democratic and Republican politicians alike are afraid to do.
We keep building in vulnerable coastal areas and on flood plains, pretty much daring Mother Nature to whack us.

Pin It on Pinterest