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How to Safely Recycle Unwanted or Unusable Ammunition

How to Safely Recycle Unwanted or Unusable Ammunition

What’s in Ammunition?
A cartridge is made up of a bullet, casing, gunpowder and a primer.
Can Ammunition Be Recycled?
This new device will make it easier for police departments and other recyclers to collect ammunition and recycle it.
The brass casing is recyclable, so after a round has been fired at the range, this portion can be recycled.
Brass casings can be reused a number of times.
If they don’t collect it there, make sure you check their collection events.
Local Gun Range If your local hazardous waste facility doesn’t work, the next place to check is local gun ranges.
While this may not work if you have a large number of corroded rounds, if you just have a few, they may be willing to accept them.
The water or oil may not make it into the cartridge, or the gunpowder could dry out, making the cartridge dangerous once again if thrown into the trash.

Wellness

Michelle Obama, Queen of Subtle Shade, Takes Jab at Trump’s Twitter Habits

Michelle Obama, Queen of Subtle Shade, Takes Jab at Trump’s Twitter Habits

But she did it in the classiest, most artful way possible: without even uttering his name.
During a sit-down chat with poet Elizabeth Alexander, Obama touched on the importance of using social media platforms in a cautious and educated manner. “This whole ‘tell it like it is’ business, that’s nonsense,” she explained.
And then came the true zinger. “You just don’t say what’s on your mind.
You don’t tweet every thought,” she said.
Although the former FLOTUS was quick to clarify that she wasn’t “talking about anybody in particular,” the crowd’s reaction certainly said it all, as many let out audible chuckles and rounds of applause, surmising that she was referring to the current POTUS.
On top of that, Alexander semi-sarcastically added, “Hah, we are so not talking about anybody in particular.”
Obama went on to make one last social-media-related suggestion to the crowd: “You need to think and spell it right and have good grammar too.”
Michelle Obama is totally not shading Donald Trump’s tweeting habits.

Energy

Japan Sees Little Chance Of Oil Slick From Sunk Tanker Reaching Its Coast

Japan Sees Little Chance Of Oil Slick From Sunk Tanker Reaching Its Coast

TOKYO, Jan 16 (Reuters) – Japan sees little chance of the oil spill from a stricken Iranian tanker that sank on Sunday in the East China Sea reaching its shores, an official at the nation’s environment ministry said on Tuesday.
The vessel’s crew of 30 Iranians and two Bangladeshis are all believed to have perished in the incident.
He declined to be named as he was not authorised to speak to media.
The tanker had been adrift and ablaze after crashing into the freighter CF Crystal (IMO:9497050) on Jan. 6.
Strong winds pushed it away from the Chinese coast, where the incident happened, and into Japan’s exclusive economic zone (EEZ). “From the area where the tanker sank, a sea current is heading to the north, limiting the chances of the oil slick reaching Japanese coasts,” the official at the environment ministry said.
Bunker fuel is the dirtiest kind of oil, extremely toxic when spilled, though less explosive than condensate.
The Coast Guard spokesman said it had not identified what kind of oil was contained in the slick.
(Reporting by Yuka Obayashi; Editing by Joseph Radford) Generated by readers, the comments included herein do not reflect the views and opinions of Rigzone.
All comments are subject to editorial review.

Alternative Energy

Iranian Tanker Leaves Massive Oil Slick, Worries Mount Over Environmental Damage

Iranian Tanker Leaves Massive Oil Slick, Worries Mount Over Environmental Damage

Experts have expressed concern about the potential environmental aftermath of a stricken Iranian oil tanker that exploded and sank in the East China Sea on Sunday.
The Sanchi—carrying 150,000 tons, or nearly 1 million barrels, of condensate oil—collided with the CF Crystal on Jan 6.
The tanker caught fire and burned for more than a week before sinking.
The slick is thought to be made up of heavy fuel used to power the vessel.
BBC’s China Correspondent Robin Brant reported that the oil slick has more than doubled in size since Sunday, noting that the big concern now is the environmental impact.
According to Reuters, “bunker fuel is the dirtiest kind of oil, extremely toxic when spilled, though less explosive.
As Rick Steiner, a U.S. marine scientist explained to the news service, the East China Sea is known for its rich—but already polluted—marine ecosystem that includes whales, porpoises and seabirds.
This is particularly so with condensate spills, as the substance is so toxic and volatile,” said Steiner.
In a statement, Greenpeace said the explosion and sinking occurred in “an important (fish) spawning ground.”
The area is also on the migratory pathway of many marine mammals, such as humpback whale, right whale and gray whale,” the environmental organization said.

Climate Change & Global Warming

The Chinese coal city that electrified its entire taxi fleet

The Chinese coal city that electrified its entire taxi fleet

Taiyuan, the capital of Shanxi province, replaced 8,000 petrol-powered taxis with electric vehicles in a single year.
By reducing the number of petrol cars on the road, the city is tackling its car pollution problem while shoring up China’s position as a leader in clean technology.
However, Taiyuan was not one of them.
Like most of China’s city’s, Taiyuan has a public taxi fleet owned by several companies.
Public taxi drivers buy their own vehicles (or lease them from companies).
Taiyuan’s fleet was due to be replaced in 2016 anyway (in China, municipal governments set limits on how long fleets are allowed in operation before re-registration is needed), so taxi drivers were expecting to buy new vehicles.
EVs account for 1.8% of all road vehicles in Taiyuan (20,000 EVs out of 1.15 million vehicles).
But Shanxi produces one quarter of the country’s coal and its power generation relies on it far more than the national average.
It is worth noting that the city’s promotion of the EV sector is closely associated with the current mayor, Geng Yanbo, who featured in the BBC documentary The Chinese Mayor.
On October 23, 12 cities in the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group, including London and Paris, announced they would buy only zero-emission buses from 2025.

Alternative Energy

All Renewables Will Be Cost Competitive With Fossil Fuels by 2020

All Renewables Will Be Cost Competitive With Fossil Fuels by 2020

According to a cost analysis from the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), the best onshore wind and solar photovoltaic (PV) projects could deliver electricity for $0.03 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) by 2019, much lower than the current cost of power from fossil fuels, which ranges from $0.05 to $0.17 per kWh.
Additionally, solar PV costs are expected to halve by 2020.
In the last 12 months alone, the global weighted average costs of onshore wind and solar PV have stood at $0.06 and $0.10 per kWh, respectively.
Additionally, record low prices for solar PV in Abu Dhabi, Chile, Dubai, Mexico, Peru and Saudi Arabia have made $0.03 kWh (and below) the new benchmark. “This new dynamic signals a significant shift in the energy paradigm,” Adnan Z. Amin, IRENA director-general, said.
According to the report, the cost reductions have been driven by a number of factors, including competitive procurement practices, the emergence of a large base of experienced medium-to-large project developers competing for global market opportunities, and continued technological advancements.
Here are highlights from the report: The global weighted average levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of utility-scale solar PV has fallen by 73 percent between 2010 and 2017 to $0.10/kWh.
The average cost of electricity from onshore wind fell by 23 percent between 2010 and 2017.
New bioenergy and geothermal projects commissioned in 2017 had global weighted average costs of around $0.07/kWh.
By 2020, project and auction data suggest that all currently commercialized renewable power generation technologies will be competing, and even undercutting, fossil fuels by generating in the range $0.03 to $0.10/kWh range.

Wellness

The Internet Is Having a Field Day With Melania Trump’s First Lady Portrait

The Internet Is Having a Field Day With Melania Trump’s First Lady Portrait

The White House released Melania Trump’s official portrait as first lady on April 3 and a flurry of hilarious reactions on Twitter ensued because, well, that’s what Twitter is for.
pic.twitter.com/FOTeIWCH0w — Full Frontal (@FullFrontalSamB) April 3, 2017 @molly_knight @sahilkapur @FLOTUS a bold and unconventional portrait tbh molly pic.twitter.com/OoyhGtj9qR — darth™ (@darth) April 3, 2017 Congrats to Melania on her official portrait pic.twitter.com/SuTfebTtTI — Luke O’Neil (@lukeoneil47) April 3, 2017 How they FaceTune an official White House portrait?
Bye https://t.co/QPysRywVsQ — @MADBLACKTHOT (@MADBLACKTHOT) April 3, 2017 @nycjim Oh.
God.
It’s a Revlon ad.
— Jessica Craven (@Craven7Jessica) April 3, 2017 @TheCut five instagram filters and the liquefy tool in photoshop?
More like a Missing Person poster.
— Kimberly Sheinwald (@kimberlyybarra) April 3, 2017 The White House did not reveal the name of the photographer who took Trump’s portrait.
However, the first lady did offer a comment on her duties in a statement.
Image Source: The White House

Energy

Norway’s Aker BP Raises 2018 Dividend Forecast, More To Come

Norway’s Aker BP Raises 2018 Dividend Forecast, More To Come

“Our financial position has been strengthened.
We have seen a rapid de-leveraging, and foresee a solid cash generation combined with a strong liquidity position,” the company, 30 percent owned by BP, said in a statement.
The company said production could rise up to 330,000 boepd in 2023, including both approved and yet to be approved projects, up from a previous estimate of 270,000 boepd. “We are well positioned for further growth.
The company plans investments of about $1.3 billion in 2018, with exploration expected to account for $350 million and decommissioning expenditure $350 million.
Following the acquisition of Hess Norge and approval of three new developments at the end of 2017, the company revised its reserves up by 202 million boe to 913 million boe.
Aker BP plans to drill 12 exploration wells in 2018, up from nine wells last year, with potential discovery estimates ranging from 50 to 150 million boe net for the company.
(Reporting by Nerijus Adomaitis, Editing by Terje Solsvik and Mark Potter) Generated by readers, the comments included herein do not reflect the views and opinions of Rigzone.
All comments are subject to editorial review.
Off-topic, inappropriate or insulting comments will be removed.

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Conservation & Sustainability

Scotland’s historic sites at high risk from climate change, report says

Scotland’s historic sites at high risk from climate change, report says

Dozens of Scotland’s most famous historic sites are at very high risk of being badly damaged by climate change and need urgent protection, an expert survey has found.
Of those, 28 sites are identified as at the greatest risk because they are not yet properly protected.
They too are under constant supervision, lowering the threat level to amber, but HES officials warn that even so, protected sites could still be damaged by the far more severe weather events now being forecast.
Combined into a single database, the surveys have confirmed evidence from numerous places that already fragile or exposed historic sites are at even greater risk from heavier flooding, coastal erosion driven by stronger storms and rising sea levels, increased winter rainfall or much drier summers.
The database will be constantly updated and refined, said Ewan Hyslop, the agency’s head of technical research and science, particularly after far more detailed and updated UK-wide projections of climate risks are published in several months.
HES has increased the priority it gives to climate mitigation under legislation driven through by Nicola Sturgeon, Scotland’s first minister, which requires public bodies to factor climate change into their activities.
The budget of Sepa, the Scottish agency responsible for monitoring climate change, will also be cut again.
The research draws on forecasts from Sepa that sea levels around Scotland will increase by between 16.5 and 28 centimetres by 2050, threatening coastal sites such as Skara Brae.
The report notes: “Water is the most destructive agent of decay.
On a large scale, heavy and intense rainfall can directly lead to flooding in a short timeframe, which has the potential to cause catastrophic damage to all elements of the historic environment within reach of these potential flood zones.”

Conservation & Sustainability

Remembering conservation visionary Leon Rajaobelina

Remembering conservation visionary Leon Rajaobelina

Leon Rajaobelina, the longtime head of the Conservation International Madagascar program and a prominent leader in that country, passed away January 11.
Rajaobelina’s contributions to Conservation International, its missions and its partners were many.
In 2005, he spearheaded the Madagascar Foundation for Protected Areas and Biodiversity, serving as chairman until 2011.
In addition, he co-chaired the Steering Committee of the Wealth Accounting and Valuation of Ecosystem Services Initiative.
His long and distinguished career included work in the public and financial sectors in Madagascar and internationally.
Before he joined Conservation International, Rajaobelina served as alternate executive director of the International Monetary Fund, governor of the Central Bank of Madagascar, Madagascar’s minister of finance and its ambassador to the United States.
He also acted as Special Advisor to the president of Madagascar, working to advance the nation’s development strategy with international donors and others.
In a tribute to Rajaobelina, Conservation International’s Chairman of the Board and former CEO, Peter Seligmann, and former president, Russell Mittermeier, shared the impact he had on them and their work.
And, he was a financial wizard, leading national and global efforts to define the economic value that nature brings to nations, and the economic peril that the destruction of nature causes to people and to countries.
“Leon understood the Conservation International idea of ‘head in the sky and feet in the mud.’ In Madagascar, where the contrast of biodiversity wealth and economic poverty is as stark as any place on earth, Leon persistently and successfully convinced sequential Malagasy heads of state that the path to economic advancement was actually a path of biodiversity protection and conservation.

Conservation & Sustainability

It’s time to go nuclear in the fight against climate change

It’s time to go nuclear in the fight against climate change

Something big has to change, and fast, in order to prevent us from going over the climate cliff.
Solar power has grown at a whopping 68 percent average rate over the past 10 years, but still accounts for less than 2 percent of total U.S. electricity generation.
The 99 reactors in the U.S. generate about 10 times that amount.
“In 2016, renewables received about 100 times more in federal subsidies than nuclear plants,” Michael Shellenberger, founder of the Berkeley, California-based, pro-nuclear advocacy group Environmental Progress, wrote in an email to Grist.
A similar story is playing out in Germany.
Jenkins wrote on Twitter that Germany’s shift in energy policy was misguided and resulted effectively in fossil fuels replacing much of the missing nuclear power — a pattern that’s playing out at home, as well.
For once-and-future climate leaders like Germany and the United States to turn their backs on one of the best tools we have for rapidly decarbonizing the global economy is a short-sighted decision of international and multi-generational consequence.
He and Shellenberger see support for the industry as a tactic for attracting the Trump Administration’s attention on climate policy.
The sheer urgency of climate change demands an all-of-the-above approach to making carbon-free energy.
The more the world feels the powerful effects of climate change and the longer we wait to reduce emissions the more attractive nuclear energy could become.

Conservation & Sustainability

Houston’s city-beautification efforts might also fight future flooding

Houston’s city-beautification efforts might also fight future flooding

On a recent afternoon, Beth White, CEO of the nonprofit Houston Parks Board, steps onto a trail along Brays Bayou in the southeastern part of the city.
There are 12 major bayous in Harris County, connecting 22 watersheds to the Gulf of Mexico.
White is walking near a meandering part of the Brays in the neighborhood of Idylwood.
Parks Board, a local nonprofit that advocates for green space, completed trails here in 2014, adding a kayak ramp and native plants as part of its Bayou Greenways 2020 project.
His research suggests that different natural features, like wetlands and reservoirs, help to mitigate flooding.
The Bayou Greenways project is based on a plan from 1912 to connect Houston’s bayous with park space.
In northeast Houston, the Greens Bayou Wetlands Mitigation Bank, finished in 2016, filters water and provides habitats for native species.
Flood Control planted trees along a river to prevent erosion and is using another creek to study how well prairies soak up floodwaters.
“We’re not primarily a flood-mitigation project,” she says.
After Harvey, Dinn organized a group of neighbors to clean debris out of the bayous.

Conservation & Sustainability

I Think I’m Going to Kathmandu: Citizen Science for Freshwater in Nepal

I Think I’m Going to Kathmandu: Citizen Science for Freshwater in Nepal

Now that I am settling in at The Nature Conservancy, I see more potential to develop citizen science platforms.
The Water Problem in Nepal’s Kathmandu Valley There has been recent and widespread interest, within both the Nepali government and the international community, in the further development of groundwater resources for irrigation, municipal, and industrial uses in the Kathmandu Valley.
In general, community-based monitoring and development efforts help identify water supply vulnerabilities and serve as the foundation for developing mitigation and/or adaptation measures.
A Case Study for Kathmandu Valley Since data collection is expensive, it is a clear limiting factor for resource management in Nepal and across much of the Global South.
In Kathmandu Valley, we’re trying to use mobile technology and establish a citizen science (i.e. community based) network for monitoring hydrology related data (e.g. groundwater levels, groundwater quality, flow from stone spouts, streamflow, precipitation).
My short hands-on experience while visiting the Chisopani regional school in Nepal is part of a broader partnership with Smartphones4Water where local stakeholders and citizen scientists are trained to perform hydrological measurements.
These measurements include monitoring groundwater levels, estimating spring and stream discharge, and assessing water quality with simple testing strips.
When possible, we engage local students in grades 6 through 12 and emphasize employing women for the collection of new hydrologic data.
What Is the Role of Citizen Science for Conservation?
Given The Nature Conservancy’s growing commitment to helping develop connections between nature AND people, citizen science really could serve as a long-lasting and impactful approach to monitoring, informing and targeting conservation where it matters most.

Conservation & Sustainability

What If All Maps Were Secret?

What If All Maps Were Secret?

But I’m a geographer who works in a country where all of the maps were once secret.
One day I went to do a survey in Long Duhung, a small remote village in East Kalimantan, on the island of Borneo in Indonesia.
I asked one of villagers why the river was so brown, and he said an industrial oil palm plantation created some deforested areas near the village.
How come policy makers were approving logging and plantations in the village forest areas?
At The Nature Conservancy, I’m one of the people who helps turn geographic data into a flat map with the least amount of distortion, so you can look at an online or paper map and find what you are looking for.
In East Kalimantan, we use spatial data to help logging concessions sustainably manage their forests.
But leaders have been slow in using accurate maps for planning and policy decisions.
In East Kalimantan and throughout Borneo, primary forest and good condition of secondary forest are often given to oil palm concessions without a good baseline from spatial information.
A large part of my work at the Conservancy involves creating tools to share maps and GIS data, to make sure the maps used for conservation and land-use planning are accurate.
My colleagues and I developed a WebGIS that provides spatial data layers for decision makers and the public in East Kalimantan’s Berau district.

LATEST FROMClimate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change & Global Warming

The Chinese coal city that electrified its entire taxi fleet

The Chinese coal city that electrified its entire taxi fleet

Taiyuan, the capital of Shanxi province, replaced 8,000 petrol-powered taxis with electric vehicles in a single year.
By reducing the number of petrol cars on the road, the city is tackling its car pollution problem while shoring up China’s position as a leader in clean technology.
However, Taiyuan was not one of them.
Like most of China’s city’s, Taiyuan has a public taxi fleet owned by several companies.
Public taxi drivers buy their own vehicles (or lease them from companies).
Taiyuan’s fleet was due to be replaced in 2016 anyway (in China, municipal governments set limits on how long fleets are allowed in operation before re-registration is needed), so taxi drivers were expecting to buy new vehicles.
EVs account for 1.8% of all road vehicles in Taiyuan (20,000 EVs out of 1.15 million vehicles).
But Shanxi produces one quarter of the country’s coal and its power generation relies on it far more than the national average.
It is worth noting that the city’s promotion of the EV sector is closely associated with the current mayor, Geng Yanbo, who featured in the BBC documentary The Chinese Mayor.
On October 23, 12 cities in the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group, including London and Paris, announced they would buy only zero-emission buses from 2025.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Scotland’s historic sites at high risk from climate change, report says

Scotland’s historic sites at high risk from climate change, report says

Dozens of Scotland’s most famous historic sites are at very high risk of being badly damaged by climate change and need urgent protection, an expert survey has found.
Of those, 28 sites are identified as at the greatest risk because they are not yet properly protected.
They too are under constant supervision, lowering the threat level to amber, but HES officials warn that even so, protected sites could still be damaged by the far more severe weather events now being forecast.
Combined into a single database, the surveys have confirmed evidence from numerous places that already fragile or exposed historic sites are at even greater risk from heavier flooding, coastal erosion driven by stronger storms and rising sea levels, increased winter rainfall or much drier summers.
The database will be constantly updated and refined, said Ewan Hyslop, the agency’s head of technical research and science, particularly after far more detailed and updated UK-wide projections of climate risks are published in several months.
HES has increased the priority it gives to climate mitigation under legislation driven through by Nicola Sturgeon, Scotland’s first minister, which requires public bodies to factor climate change into their activities.
The budget of Sepa, the Scottish agency responsible for monitoring climate change, will also be cut again.
The research draws on forecasts from Sepa that sea levels around Scotland will increase by between 16.5 and 28 centimetres by 2050, threatening coastal sites such as Skara Brae.
The report notes: “Water is the most destructive agent of decay.
On a large scale, heavy and intense rainfall can directly lead to flooding in a short timeframe, which has the potential to cause catastrophic damage to all elements of the historic environment within reach of these potential flood zones.”

Climate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending January 12, 2018

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending January 12, 2018

  None of the four points discussed below is a scientific finding, or a technological development. This may be our

Climate Change & Global Warming

Is taking a sabbatical on your wish list? Here’s how to make it happen

Is taking a sabbatical on your wish list? Here’s how to make it happen

From time to time, running away from our job to take time off for a few months has crossed most of our minds!
The usual job ‘perks’, such as being paid and your pension contributions, may be suspended for the duration of the sabbatical period.
However, employees have the security of returning to their job.
Here are six steps you can take to make it possible!
Are you constantly burned out and need to recharge?
Don’t lead the conversation by saying, “you’re not happy at work therefore think is time for a break”, instead, say that you would like to take time off and focus on how you can become a better employee.
Make this easy to understand to everyone who will be directly impacted by your decision.
Prep your colleagues Now that your boss is onboard with it all, it’s time to prep your colleagues who will be taking some of your work while you’re gone.
Make a promise to yourself to disconnect from ALL things work related, like emails and calls and remind yourself why you took this time away, to begin with.
Plan your reentry A week or two before you return to work, start going through your work emails and reaching out to colleagues who were helpful through the process.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Tesla’s South Australian super battery beats expectations for first month

Tesla’s South Australian super battery beats expectations for first month

The aspect that has generated the most interest is the battery’s rapid response time in smoothing out several major energy outages that have occurred since it was installed.
Victoria’s government will be tracking the Hornsdale battery’s early performance with interest.
Generation and Consumption Over the full month of December, the Hornsdale power reserve generated 2.42 gigawatt-hours of energy, and consumed 3.06GWh.
Frequency Control Ancillary Services There are eight different Frequency Control Ancillary Services (FCAS) markets in the National Electricity Market (NEM).
As the service may have to increase or decrease the frequency, there is thus a total of six contingency markets (three that raise frequency in the timescales above, and three that reduce it).
This is one of the services that the Hornsdale Power Reserve has been providing.
However, unlike contingency services, which essentially wait for an unexpected change in frequency, the response is governed by a control signal, sent from the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO).
This control signal alters the output of the generator such that the supply and demand balanced is maintained.
As can be seen, the output of the battery closely follows the amount of capacity it has enabled in the regulation market.
With the costs and need for frequency control service increasing in recent years, the boost to supply through the Hornsdale power reserve is good news for consumers, and a timely addition to Australia’s energy market.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Macron urges Chinese people to “make our planet great again” – in Mandarin

Macron urges Chinese people to “make our planet great again” – in Mandarin

French president did not announce any new climate initiatives with Xi Jinping on China visit, but his efforts to learn the language went viral French president Emmanuel Macron charmed the Chinese public by delivering his climate slogan “make our planet great again” in Mandarin during a three-day visit to China.
Parce que le climat parle à tout le monde : “Make our planet great again” … en chinois.
pic.twitter.com/C6UTeP16Nr — Emmanuel Macron (@EmmanuelMacron) January 8, 2018 Observers hoping for new climate change initiatives were disappointed by a joint statement from Macron and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping, however.
Climate activists have pinned high hopes on the two leaders to renew political momentum for the international climate treaty that aims to limit global temperature rise within 2C, despite the White House.
Report: Macron summit touts green finance progress – despite Trump Yet in their joint statement, released by Xinhua News Agency on Wednesday, Macron and Xi focused on what was already agreed.
The two reassured each other they would “deepen cooperation” on environment and climate change, and applauded each other’s recent achievements: the Paris One Planet Summit hosted by France and soft launch of a national emissions trading scheme in China.
Both sides expressed satisfaction with progress that had been made on green financing since China hosted the G20 summit in Hangzhou in 2016, according to the statement.
As a demonstration of the two countries’ commitment to multilateralism, Xi and Macron said they will “keep constructive dialogues on international treaties”, including biodiversity, nature conservation and protecting marine life.
Li Shuo, a senior climate campaigner with Greenpeace, said the dialogue “strikes the right tone for this critical year of climate action, when over 190 nations are expected to work out detailed rules to implement Paris Agreement.
“Going forward, a Sino-France alliance is critical in effectively implementing the Paris Agreement and strengthening global climate ambition.” Among a string of business deals with China Macron secured during his visits, cooperation deals on nuclear and aviation were framed as means to tackle climate change by some Chinese observers.

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