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Climate Change & Global Warming

Fantastic visualization of Earth’s atmosphere in 2017

Fantastic visualization of Earth’s atmosphere in 2017

By tracking what is carried on the wind.
Tiny aerosol particles such as smoke, dust, and sea salt are transported across the globe, making visible weather patterns and other normally invisible physical processes.
During the same time, large fires in the Pacific Northwest released smoke into the atmosphere.
Unlike the sea salt, however, the dust is removed from the center of the storm.
Advances in computing speed allow scientists to include more details of these physical processes in their simulations of how the aerosols interact with the storm systems.
Geoengineering – the intentional manipulation of the climate to counter the effect of global warming by injecting aerosols artificially… Guest essay by Eric Worrall The Financial Times is disappointed that hitting the Paris targets is looking even less likely, thanks to economic growth driving a rise in CO2 emissions.
In October 2017, CEI submitted a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request for emails of… From the LONDON SCHOOL OF HYGIENE & TROPICAL MEDICINE and the “who needs death certificates when you have RCP models?” department.
Study of impact of climate change on temperatures suggests more deaths unless action taken The largest study to date of the potential temperature-related health impacts of climate change has shown that as global temperatures rise,… From the TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY OF MUNICH (TUM) and the “cities have greater CO2 and greater warmth” department, comes this verification of Liebigs Law of the Minimum and a follow on to a story we covered on the same subject a few years back.
Lower troposphere dataset has warmest October in satellite… The best way to remember how entertaining (or horrifying) climate science, energy policy etc, has been in 2017 is to buy a Cartoons by Josh Calendar 2018.
This cuts the printing… The Effects of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation on U.S.

Alternative Energy

Staying Safe on the Job: Fall Protection in Renewable Energy Demands Planning and Training

Staying Safe on the Job: Fall Protection in Renewable Energy Demands Planning and Training

The exponential growth of the industry for over 15 years has resulted in a rise in the number of employees.
Technicians working in this industry usually work several hundred feet above the ground and are exposed to extreme hazards in remote locations.
With the ‘Milan’ rescue device, technicians working on wind turbines can abseil quickly in case of emergency.
Wearing appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to protect against falling is by no means enough.
Employers also have to plan for an emergency, developing procedures for the quickest possible action, which is key since wind turbines are usually located in remote locations.
Rescue services or fire departments cannot always reach the site quickly enough due to geographical restrictions, which is why every employer must ensure that an injured person can be rescued by his or her own colleagues.
Storing Rescue Equipment on Site When rescuing a person from heights, rescue and abseiling devices that are equipped with a centrifugal brake, constant rate descenders, have proven their worth.
In cases such as these, self-evacuation can be done with the help of a personal abseiling device.
Malcolm Cobb is a lead instructor for wind training at SKYLOTEC.
He was formally a lead safety and rescue instructor for one of the industry’s largest manufacturers of wind turbines.

Wellness

This genius in-flight hydration hack fights inflammation and only costs $3

This genius in-flight hydration hack fights inflammation and only costs $3

But what if there was a genius travel hack that could help you get more out of every ounce of H20 you consume so you didn’t have to spend your entire time in-flight either chugging from your reusable water bottle or waiting in line for the bathroom?
Luckily, one little root can turn even the smallest amount of regular H2O into wildly hydrating, jet-lag-fighting, super liquid—and it comes from the marshmallow plant.
(Mucilage-rich plants have been used to fight inflammation for over 4,000 years, FYI.)
And its ability to hold on to water carries over in your system.
The thick, viscous quality of marshmallow root water is beneficial not only to your hydration, but also your digestive system, including your stomach and intestinal lining, your respiratory system, your urinary tract—even your skin.
Marshmallow root’s demulcent qualities are activated in cold water, which makes it the perfect thing for airport drinking fountains.
Once cold water is added to the root, the mucilage is released.
The longer the root sits in the water, the more slippery the water becomes; it’ll even change the color of the liquid.
In the morning you’ll awake to a slimy—but highly effective!— hydrating liquid.
You get the benefit of an earthier-tasting water and the moisture-boosting, soothing benefits of marshmallow root.

Organic Living

Get to Know Your Poinsettias: History, Growing, and Styling

Get to Know Your Poinsettias: History, Growing, and Styling

Colorful bracts and small flowers are also seen on other common flowering shrubs and trees like dogwoods and hydrangeas.
It was in the sixteenth century that the poinsettia became commonly associated with Christmas.
The plant’s December blooming time and star-shaped bracts that bring to mind the Star of Bethlehem are probably where the original connection with the holiday came from.
In the nineteenth century, Joel Roberts Poinsett, the United States’ first ambassador to Mexico and an avid gardener, fell in love with the plants and sent some back to his home in South Carolina, introducing them to the U.S. for the first time.
The plant got its common name from Poinsett.
Growing and Care Begin by purchasing a plant that looks healthy.
A lot of people avoid having poinsettias in the house because of the fear that they are dangerous to cats and dogs, but the plants are not as poisonous to pets as is commonly thought.
For more on plants that can be harmful to dogs and cats, take a look at this post.
Leave the fake colors and pick a gorgeous natural poinsettia instead.
Want more winter flowers?

Energy

This is what it’s actually like to be on a fracking site

This is what it’s actually like to be on a fracking site

But while there is a storm of protests outside fracking sites, what exactly goes on inside?
The possibility of IGas undertaking shale gas extraction – as it is also known – at Barton Moss, in Salford, remains but for now the closest site to Greater Manchester is at Little Plumpton, in Fyle, Lancashire.
Here Cuadrilla are currently in the process of drilling two exploratory wells to see whether this location will be suitable for fracking.
He said: “The gas within shale rock has been held there for millions of years.
Environmental group Friends of the Earth are among these people.
Dozens of them were involved in a large protest outside Salford’s Barton Moss in 2014, with many cmaping outside the iGas site to protest over test drilling work.
And on the flip side, Cuadrilla argue that shale gas has very real benefits.
If we can produce gas from shale rock it will decrease the importing of gas and save for the balance of payments.” He added that the production process involved in fracking is cleaner than other forms of gas manufacture and that it will also create jobs.
As yet no decision has been has been made public but Mr Lambert has given an insight as to what sort of locations companies such as his favour.
He said: “The first thing we look at is geology, does the area provide shale gas and it is difficult to tell without test.

Conservation & Sustainability

The FAA Can’t Stop People From Throwing Live Turkeys Out Of Planes

The FAA Can’t Stop People From Throwing Live Turkeys Out Of Planes

The Federal Aviation Administration has found no violations with an infamous Arkansas event that involves dropping live turkeys from a plane ― but that may be because no one ever thought they’d need a rule about that.
“This does not mean we endorse the practice.” The Associated Press and WREG reported last month that the FAA would be looking into possible laws or regulations broken during the annual Turkey Trot festival in Yellville, Arkansas.
This year’s Turkey Trot took place on Oct. 14.
Though the fall festival includes many events, it’s best known for the “turkey drop,” in which live turkeys are dropped from a plane 500 feet in the air.
Festivalgoers chase and catch the surviving turkeys.
Even if the turkeys survive, however, the noise of the plane and the drop itself would be terrifying, Yvonne Vizzier Thaxton, a poultry science professor, said last year.
The FAA spokesman explained to HuffPost that the agency has no power when it comes to animal welfare issues.
“Our regulations only cover ‘objects,’ and specify that they can be dropped from aircraft as long as they don’t pose a danger to people or property on the ground,” he said.
Unfortunately for the turkeys, it doesn’t seem like that’s going to happen anytime soon.
Marion County Sheriff Clinton Evans told the Democrat-Gazette this week that Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Kenford Carter would not be pursuing any charges related to the turkey drop.

Alternative Energy

A Brief History of Utility-Scale Energy Storage

A Brief History of Utility-Scale Energy Storage

Fast forward and the market is expecting 6 GW to be installed in 2017 alone.
Globally, analysts expect the energy storage market to grow 47 percent in 2017 over 2016 installations.
The integrated control system operates the energy storage system in a variety of modes interfacing with inverters, power meters, the battery management system and the utility’s upstream system controls.
Today: Fast-tracking Energy Storage in Southern California In Southern California, energy storage systems from two different developers totaling about 39.5 MW were built in late 2016 to provide critical grid support and capacity services.
All three projects utilized Eaton grid connection switchgear and medium voltage transformers.
This system will be used for a host of purposes, including: to provide back-up power services to the arena; to enable the arena to power the surrounding neighborhood in the case of a grid outage; to function as an emergency power supply, capture peaks in energy demand and support grid stability through frequency regulation, load shifting and PV usage optimization.
An operational microgrid at Eaton’s Power Systems Experience Center near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania includes the Power Xpert Energy Optimizer controller.
The xStorage Building System used by the Amsterdam ArenA efficiently stores and distributes energy when it is needed and supports frequency regulation, peak shaving and battery-backup for events.
Beyond The Battery: Energy Storage System Components Regardless of the battery technology used, the electrical system supporting large-scale energy storage projects looks largely the same; grid-tied power conversion systems, electrical balance of system equipment to connect to the utility grid or facility and the controller that intelligently manages it.
An energy storage system controller is the interface between the battery management system (BMS) and the utility or building control system and supports specific application requirements like frequency regulation, renewable firming, load shifting, or demands made to the system.

Conservation & Sustainability

Head Of Puerto Rico Power Utility Resigns As More Controversy Plagues Island

Head Of Puerto Rico Power Utility Resigns As More Controversy Plagues Island

The head of Puerto Rico’s power utility resigned Friday while facing scrutiny for the slow progress being made on restoring the island’s power grid eight weeks after Hurricane Maria devastated the U.S. territory.
Ricardo Ramos, executive director of the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA), submitted his resignation, effective immediately, to the utility’s board.
The contract, which Puerto Rico officials canceled after the hearing, was suspect because the bankrupt utility chose Whitefish Energy over larger firms with lower rates and more experience in dealing with disaster-stricken areas, according to The Washington Post.
“I trust that this process will occur as fast as possible and will not affect the work of rehabilitating the electricity system across the island.” San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz, an outspoken voice for more support during Puerto Rico’s recovery, said that Ramos “helped destroy the credibility of the PR government” and called him “a disgrace.” That Ricardo Ramos does not head PREPA is the right thing.
— Carmen Yulín Cruz (@CarmenYulinCruz) November 17, 2017 In his hearing with the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee this week, Ramos defended his contract with Whitefish Energy, saying that he chose the firm after reviewing “a half-dozen proposals” and found that Whitefish and another firm were the only two that offered immediate services that Puerto Rico desperately needed.
Ramos added that he believed PREPA was unable to meet the requirements for mutual assistance with other public utility companies, “such as providing accommodations for workers and other logistics.” Ramos also said that PREPA didn’t have enough supplies for their own crews, let alone another firms.
“We had no fuel, no phone, no internet.
No nothing,” Ramos said to the committee, according to The New York Times.
“How could I bring more people into that situation?” On Wednesday, a major blackout shuttered San Juan, the island’s capital and most populous city, and surrounding areas hours after officials announced that Puerto Rico had reached its goal of having 50 percent of its power generation restored, ABC News reported.
As of Friday, two months after Maria hit Puerto Rico as a Category 4 hurricane, PREPA has restored up to 43 percent of the island’s power.

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Conservation & Sustainability

The FAA Can’t Stop People From Throwing Live Turkeys Out Of Planes

The FAA Can’t Stop People From Throwing Live Turkeys Out Of Planes

The Federal Aviation Administration has found no violations with an infamous Arkansas event that involves dropping live turkeys from a plane ― but that may be because no one ever thought they’d need a rule about that.
“This does not mean we endorse the practice.” The Associated Press and WREG reported last month that the FAA would be looking into possible laws or regulations broken during the annual Turkey Trot festival in Yellville, Arkansas.
This year’s Turkey Trot took place on Oct. 14.
Though the fall festival includes many events, it’s best known for the “turkey drop,” in which live turkeys are dropped from a plane 500 feet in the air.
Festivalgoers chase and catch the surviving turkeys.
Even if the turkeys survive, however, the noise of the plane and the drop itself would be terrifying, Yvonne Vizzier Thaxton, a poultry science professor, said last year.
The FAA spokesman explained to HuffPost that the agency has no power when it comes to animal welfare issues.
“Our regulations only cover ‘objects,’ and specify that they can be dropped from aircraft as long as they don’t pose a danger to people or property on the ground,” he said.
Unfortunately for the turkeys, it doesn’t seem like that’s going to happen anytime soon.
Marion County Sheriff Clinton Evans told the Democrat-Gazette this week that Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Kenford Carter would not be pursuing any charges related to the turkey drop.

Conservation & Sustainability

Head Of Puerto Rico Power Utility Resigns As More Controversy Plagues Island

Head Of Puerto Rico Power Utility Resigns As More Controversy Plagues Island

The head of Puerto Rico’s power utility resigned Friday while facing scrutiny for the slow progress being made on restoring the island’s power grid eight weeks after Hurricane Maria devastated the U.S. territory.
Ricardo Ramos, executive director of the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA), submitted his resignation, effective immediately, to the utility’s board.
The contract, which Puerto Rico officials canceled after the hearing, was suspect because the bankrupt utility chose Whitefish Energy over larger firms with lower rates and more experience in dealing with disaster-stricken areas, according to The Washington Post.
“I trust that this process will occur as fast as possible and will not affect the work of rehabilitating the electricity system across the island.” San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz, an outspoken voice for more support during Puerto Rico’s recovery, said that Ramos “helped destroy the credibility of the PR government” and called him “a disgrace.” That Ricardo Ramos does not head PREPA is the right thing.
— Carmen Yulín Cruz (@CarmenYulinCruz) November 17, 2017 In his hearing with the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee this week, Ramos defended his contract with Whitefish Energy, saying that he chose the firm after reviewing “a half-dozen proposals” and found that Whitefish and another firm were the only two that offered immediate services that Puerto Rico desperately needed.
Ramos added that he believed PREPA was unable to meet the requirements for mutual assistance with other public utility companies, “such as providing accommodations for workers and other logistics.” Ramos also said that PREPA didn’t have enough supplies for their own crews, let alone another firms.
“We had no fuel, no phone, no internet.
No nothing,” Ramos said to the committee, according to The New York Times.
“How could I bring more people into that situation?” On Wednesday, a major blackout shuttered San Juan, the island’s capital and most populous city, and surrounding areas hours after officials announced that Puerto Rico had reached its goal of having 50 percent of its power generation restored, ABC News reported.
As of Friday, two months after Maria hit Puerto Rico as a Category 4 hurricane, PREPA has restored up to 43 percent of the island’s power.

Conservation & Sustainability

U.S. lifts ban on some elephant trophy imports

U.S. lifts ban on some elephant trophy imports

On Wednesday, the administration of U.S. President Donald Trump announced that the remains of legally hunted elephants in two African countries can be imported into the United States.
In an informal statement, the U.S.
“This is the wrong move at the wrong time for protecting Africa’s wildlife,” said M. Sanjayan, CEO of Conservation International.
“What’s more, this move sends a dangerous signal to poachers and to our allies about the commitment of the United States to ending the trade in ivory and endangered animal products.” The past few years have seen seismic shifts against the ivory trade and the poaching that fuels it.
In recent months, China and the United Kingdom — two of the world’s largest ivory importers — have announced plans to close their markets.
Yet the trade endures, and in places that some might not expect: According to a report released earlier this year, none other than Washington, D.C., was judged to be the seat of the ivory trade in the United States.
Meanwhile, an African elephant is killed for its tusks every 15 minutes.
The rule change applies to elephants shot in Zimbabwe starting in January 2016, and to those legally permitted to be hunted before the end of next year, the Post reported, and a similar rule has been put into place for Zambia.
Fish and Wildlife Service, a move expected to occur later this week.
“I urge the Trump administration to reconsider this decision with full public comment and participation,” he said.

Conservation & Sustainability

Mountain Lion Captured In San Francisco Freed In California Wilds

Mountain Lion Captured In San Francisco Freed In California Wilds

San Francisco police and game wardens watched for hours for a young male mountain lion from the rooftops of a city neighborhood before bringing it down with tranquilizer darts.
“When I arrived the mountain lion was hunkered down,” Lt. James Ober, a game warden with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, told the San Francisco Chronicle.
“It appeared to be under a lot of stress.” It took two darts to subdue the 82-pound cat on Friday after it had been spotted prowling around the Diamond Heights neighborhood in the heart of the city.
Police stood by with rifles in the event of an emergency.
The animal, believed to be 18 months old, was masked and its paws secured with straps.
The Santa Cruz Puma Project at the University of California Santa Cruz fitted the animal with a tracking collar and ear tag before it was taken to the Crystal Springs open area in the northern Santa Cruz Mountains.
A mountain lion identified as P-22 has been spotted in Hollywood, and other pumas live in the hills around Los Angeles.
It was the first time a mountain lion was captured in San Francisco.
There were at least two mountain lion sightings the first week of November near the Presidio and Sea Cliff area of San Francisco.
There may be as many as 6,000 of the big cats in the state, according to the Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Conservation & Sustainability

Hurricane Harvey: When Rain Bombs Go Nuclear

Hurricane Harvey: When Rain Bombs Go Nuclear

Harvey will go down in history as much more than the first major hurricane to strike the U.S. mainland in more than a decade.
Harvey may very well be the very first “rain bomb” to go nuclear.
In Harvey’s case, the fact that the storm system stalled over Houston dropping a biblical level of water over the flood-prone region has imperiled a major American city, grinding its citizens, commerce and local government to a halt.
Sadly, the scenes beaming around the world of a water-lodged Houston and the resilience of a citizen flotilla reflect the inconvenient truth that our communities and very way of life are in the crosshairs of an increasingly tumultuous world.
As a choke point for the oil industry and other major sectors, the economic ripple effects from Houston’s 1 in 500-year flood event (where the water is still rising and it is the third 500-year flood in as many years) will be felt far and wide.
Events like Houston’s flooding call on a system-wide response and, unfortunately, like the ghost of hurricane Katrina that still haunts the Gulf, many questions will be asked about preparation for hurricane Harvey.
The first, with echoes of New Orleans’ ill-fated Katrina response, being the choice to not order an evacuation.
Water rising is widely excluded from homeowners’ insurance, as well as commercial property policies, which will literally leave billions in unfunded losses.
Early estimates of Harvey’s economic costs reach and will likely exceed the $100 billion mark, with the long-term impacts affecting the thriving city of Houston for years to come.
Where all risks, especially in a turbulent interconnected world, are increasingly complex to model mathematically, resilience provides a clear investment destination.

Conservation & Sustainability

Trees Tell Us Much About Fire: What Will We Do About It?

Trees Tell Us Much About Fire: What Will We Do About It?

Logging removed the most valuable and fire-resilient trees, such as giant ponderosas in the east Cascade slope.
Meet the Ponderosa Pine While no human has lived through the storied history of fire in the region, we can look to an iconic tree to learn about the impact of fire suppression.
Living with Wildfire When a ponderosa pine is young, it is susceptible to fire, but by the time the tree reaches 4 or 5 years, it has begun to develop a thick bark that protects it from low-intensity fires that may sweep through every few years.
These crown fires are the most devastating kind of fire for pine trees.
So, what can we do to reduce the frequency of catastrophic wildfires?
Such practices enable the continuity of jobs in the forest, while giving the ponderosa pine and other fire-resistant trees more room to grow.
After forest thinning, professional fire teams can conduct controlled burns under safe conditions.
Mimicking historical wildfire patterns is an important management strategy for ensuring the health, function, and services of forests, which will in turn help us adapt to a warming climate: Healthy forests mean healthy rivers and more plentiful salmon.
Healthy forests can hold snowpack longer in the winter and release it more slowly into the rivers in the spring, ensuring sustainable water supplies for people.
Healthy forests provide habitat for wildlife, recreational opportunities for people, and ecologically sustainable jobs in the woods.

LATEST FROMClimate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change & Global Warming

Fantastic visualization of Earth’s atmosphere in 2017

Fantastic visualization of Earth’s atmosphere in 2017

By tracking what is carried on the wind.
Tiny aerosol particles such as smoke, dust, and sea salt are transported across the globe, making visible weather patterns and other normally invisible physical processes.
During the same time, large fires in the Pacific Northwest released smoke into the atmosphere.
Unlike the sea salt, however, the dust is removed from the center of the storm.
Advances in computing speed allow scientists to include more details of these physical processes in their simulations of how the aerosols interact with the storm systems.
Geoengineering – the intentional manipulation of the climate to counter the effect of global warming by injecting aerosols artificially… Guest essay by Eric Worrall The Financial Times is disappointed that hitting the Paris targets is looking even less likely, thanks to economic growth driving a rise in CO2 emissions.
In October 2017, CEI submitted a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request for emails of… From the LONDON SCHOOL OF HYGIENE & TROPICAL MEDICINE and the “who needs death certificates when you have RCP models?” department.
Study of impact of climate change on temperatures suggests more deaths unless action taken The largest study to date of the potential temperature-related health impacts of climate change has shown that as global temperatures rise,… From the TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY OF MUNICH (TUM) and the “cities have greater CO2 and greater warmth” department, comes this verification of Liebigs Law of the Minimum and a follow on to a story we covered on the same subject a few years back.
Lower troposphere dataset has warmest October in satellite… The best way to remember how entertaining (or horrifying) climate science, energy policy etc, has been in 2017 is to buy a Cartoons by Josh Calendar 2018.
This cuts the printing… The Effects of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation on U.S.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change Week In Review: Week Ending November 17, 2017

Climate Change Week In Review: Week Ending November 17, 2017

The attention of climate change activists turned in a big way to the Amazonian rain forest this week.  The actor

Climate Change & Global Warming

The Power Of World Kindness To Transform

The Power Of World Kindness To Transform

Today is World Kindness Day, a day introduced in 1998 by the World Kindness Movement a coalition of nations kindness NGOs.
It is observed in many countries, including Canada, Japan, Australia, Nigeria and the United Arab Emirates.
Spreading kindness can have such a big transformation in our daily lives – if we just took a moment to be present and intentional every single day, each of us can have the power to change lives.
Be kind to yourself.
Maybe treat yourself to a massage, or indulge in TV time without feeling guilty – this will make you feel happier and more at ease.
Call someone you haven’t spoken to in a long time.
Some of us pass by a homeless person every day on our way to work – on world kindness day, why not surprise them with a cup of coffee and a meal.
Leave a note to a friend or family member.
Smile at everyone you see.
Next time someone opens the door for you, say thank you with a smile.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending November 10, 2017

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending November 10, 2017

This Tuesday saw a number of much-watched elections in the United States. Perhaps the most heavily covered election was that

Climate Change & Global Warming

Blaming city dwellers for buying things outside the city limits, because, climate

Blaming city dwellers for buying things outside the city limits, because, climate

These upstream emissions may occur anywhere in the world and are roughly equal in size to the total emissions originating from a city’s own territory, a new study shows.
“It turns out that the same activities that cause most local emissions of urban households – housing and transport – are also responsible for the majority of upstream emissions elsewhere along the supply chain,” says lead-author Peter-Paul Pichler from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK).
The planned emission reductions presented so far by national governments at the UN summit are clearly insufficient to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius, the target agreed by 190 countries, therefore additional efforts are needed.” Housing and transport cause most city emissions, locally but also upstream Cement and steel used for buildings take a huge amount of energy – typically from fossil fuels – to be produced, for instance.
If a city instead chooses to foster low carbon construction materials this can drastically reduce its indirect CO2 emissions.
Yet it can also turn down the need for electric cooling in summer which reduces power generation and hence greenhouse gas emissions in some power plant beyond city borders.
This reduces the number of cars that need to be built somewhere else, using loads of energy.
Comparison of New York, Berlin, Mexico City, Delhi – applicable to cities across the world Interestingly, while the greenhouse gas footprint in the four cities that the scientists scrutinized range from 1.9 (Delhi) to 10.6 tons (New York) of CO2 equivalent per person and year, the proportions of local to upstream household emissions as well as the relative climate relevance of housing and transport turn out to be roughly the same.
“The power of cities, open interconnected systems of great density, to tackle climate change even in times of uncertainty on the national and international level has been underestimated by both many local decision-makers and most of the international community,” says Weisz.
Today, we have this report from the UAH dataset that points out the heat has not left the lower troposphere (about 14,000 feet altitude) based on this report from the University on Huntsville’s Dr. John Christy.
Regional Weather A climate researcher at Cornell University, Remy Mermelstein has written an interesting and provocative paper showing the linkage between the Pacific Decal Oscillation (PDO) and the climate swings in the United States on a region by region basis.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Claim: Nations will come together over Arctic science

Claim: Nations will come together over Arctic science

From TUFTS UNIVERSITY and the “kumbayah” department Science can align common interests among the world’s leading superpowers (MEDFORD/SOMERVILLE) November 3, 2017 – International scientific collaboration in the Arctic can help align common interests among countries experiencing geopolitical conflict, including the United States and Russia, according to a team of scientists and educators led by a professor at The Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy at Tufts University.
Published in Science, the article’s strategic policy assessments build upon the Agreement on Enhancing International Arctic Scientific Cooperation that was signed in May 2017 by the foreign ministers of the eight Arctic States, including U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, despite deteriorating relations between their two nations.
The Agreement, also known as the Arctic Science Agreement, minimizes the risks that short-term domestic policy shifts will impact relations within the Arctic by cementing a consensus among the countries that will last beyond political cycles, according to lead author Paul Arthur Berkman, who is a professor of practice in science diplomacy at The Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy at Tufts and the director of the Science Diplomacy Center at The Fletcher School.
He added that the Agreement enhances the stability of research platforms across nations to interpret and disseminate previously inaccessible data, and will generate continuous data to interpret marine, terrestrial, atmospheric, and human-centered changes.
In effect, the Arctic Science Agreement enhances the capacity of all nations to integrate diverse data into evidence and options that contribute to informed decision-making for Arctic sustainability.
However, the authors provided several concrete opportunities for improvements needed for the Agreement to be truly successful, such as: Establishing procedures to expedite the granting of visas and permits for international scientists accessing field sites; Digitizing historic and other data from hard-copy formats and creating shared platforms for data that can be accessed throughout the world; Increasing support for field and summer schools and related means for training the next generation of Arctic scientists; Promoting well-formulated comparative studies designed to examine common issues at multiple locations across the Arctic; Maximizing the use of icebreakers (ships designed to move and navigate through ice-covered waters) and other forms of infrastructure for scientific purposes; and Creating innovative venues that integrate natural and social sciences along with indigenous knowledge to address common concerns.
In addition, the authors explicitly call for scientific partnerships with Russia, considering the country’s sovereign rights extend over nearly half of the Arctic.
“Research partnerships with Russian scientists are critical for Arctic science and diplomatic progress,” according to the article.
Ultimately, the authors concluded that the Arctic Science Agreement should be used as a tool to facilitate research and build upon partnerships to conduct fieldwork, access data, and begin to answer previously unanswerable scientific questions, especially within pan-Arctic dimensions.
### To read the full paper, click here.

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