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Wellness

This Is One Of The Biggest Myths About Longevity

This Is One Of The Biggest Myths About Longevity

Now, in his new book, The Longevity Paradox, Dr. Gundry takes on longevity and aging.
In it, he debunks super common myths about safeguarding our long-term health.
But commonly the very things they think will keep them young are actually causing them to age more quickly.
The miniature version was simply bred over time to become smaller.
Most of the people who live in the Blue Zones are far shorter than the average height.
The early humans’ diet, which included cycles of growth and regression, prompted slow growth and late puberty.
This very precocious puberty often causes concern for parents, even before they learn that early puberty is linked to a greater risk of breast cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and death from any cause.
In one study, rapid growth during adolescence resulted in an 80 percent increased risk of cancer 15 years later.
Want another chilling fact?
Restrict the calories these mice consume, and they live even longer, yet giving them growth hormone abolishes the longevity effect of calorie restriction.

Wellness

This Is Why You Have Bad Posture & How To Fix It

This Is Why You Have Bad Posture & How To Fix It

It started hurting, as it does most days, and all I could think about was how I wish I didn’t have to sit all the time.
I sat at a desk for 12-plus years of school.
I’ve always thought of bad posture as slouched shoulders and a caved in chest, but as Dr. Kostyukovsky says, it’s much more than that.
Because if you’re already sitting in poor posture, you aren’t engaging your core anyway. “So even if you work out five times a week doing core strengthening, if you then sit at a desk all day in bad posture, you’re not able to activate your core.”
But if you’re sitting up in good posture—sitting on the right part of your pelvis with the natural curve in your lower back and in your upper back and neck, engaging your core is so much easier.”
Her first piece of advice is to strengthen your upper back because those are our posture muscles (and they’re often neglected in our workouts and day-to-day lives).
That said, if you have to be at a computer for work, she recommends doing some gentle stretches during the day to get yourself out of the rounded position more often. “Pilates is amazing for alignment and postural strengthening.
Yoga, if you’re doing it correctly, is also great for spinal mobility and upper-back strengthening.

Energy

When Will the Oil Service Market Match 2014 Highs?

When Will the Oil Service Market Match 2014 Highs?

The global oil service market will not return to previous highs until 2025.
That’s according to energy research and business intelligence company Rystad Energy, which forecasts that global service market revenues will match the $920 billion mark seen in 2014 in around six years’ time.
These revenues are expected to hit 80 percent of the 2014 figure in 2022.
“This will be the longest slump faced by the oilfield service industry since the 1980s, with about $2.3 trillion in revenues lost along the way,” Audun Martinsen, Rystad Energy’s head of oilfield service research, said in a company statement.
“On the bright side, in only three years’ time, activity levels will be higher than they were in 2014, although the cost cuts achieved in the sector means spending levels will only be 80 percent of what was seen in that peak year,” he added.
More than 100 new offshore projects are aiming for 2019 sanctions and an expected $210 billion will be spent on offshore oilfield services globally this year, Rystad Energy outlined in a statement released at the time.
Its products and services cover energy fundamentals and the global and regional upstream, oilfield services and renewable energy industries.
Generated by readers, the comments included herein do not reflect the views and opinions of Rigzone.
All comments are subject to editorial review.
Off-topic, inappropriate or insulting comments will be removed.

Climate Change & Global Warming

The Green New Deal: Finally climate policy informed by science

The Green New Deal: Finally climate policy informed by science

However, when it comes to a safe climate, science and policy have operated in a vacuum.
The Green New Deal in Congress provides an opportunity for bringing both science and policy together in shaping a sustainable future for our nation that avoids a pending crisis to the planet’s life support systems if we do not act boldly and promptly.
“A great change in our stewardship of the earth and the life on it is required,” it stated, “if vast human misery is to be avoided.” Seven take-aways from the Green New Deal launch A second warning was issued in 2017 that the planet’s climate and natural systems were indeed worsening.
Aptly named a Green New Deal, it is as ambitious as president Roosevelt’s New Deal in the 1930s.
While there are gaps to be filled, by calling for carbon-free energy, clean air and clean water and an economic system that addresses inequalities, the proposal is the most comprehensive response yet to the scientists’ warnings.
It’s safe and easy to sign up.
Recent experience shows what can be accomplished in transforming the energy sector.
The energy sector’s carbon dioxide emissions dropped 28%, despite a rising population and a larger economy.
In sum, the Green New Deal is a means for leveraging these important outcomes.
William J. Ripple, PhD, distinguished professor of ecology, Oregon State University, was the lead author of the 2017 World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice.

Organic Living

Streetlights & LEDs

Streetlights & LEDs

They initially became the preferred lighting option due to their energy efficiency and in turn, cheaper running costs, however there’s a lot more to LEDs than the basics.
LEDs have received a bit of bad press lately, particularly in the context of streetlamps.
Lower energy usage, cheaper bills LED lighting is the best solution for reducing carbon emissions, which has become really important for businesses, homes and councils.
With LED streetlights, their day to day operation consumes up to 60% less energy than their predecessors, whilst also producing more light per watt.
However there is something to be said for having more light on the streets at night – what about light pollution?
The great thing about LEDs in streetlights is that the right amount of light can be directed to exactly where it needs to be, without turning into skyglow and becoming wasted light in the sky and contributing to light pollution.
With less light pollution, our wildlife has a much better chance of naturally going about their business.
You may have heard about many different animals becoming confused by the increase in light around them, finding their habits such as pollination and hibernation becoming disrupted.
Using INUI’s LED lighting calculator, let’s say for example that you had eight lamps on your street all at 100w and on for 10 hours per day.
By switching to LED bulbs, the streets new electricity consumption (based on a 60% reduction over your current lighting installation wattage required for street lighting use) would be 3.68 kWh, with running costs at a much lower £134.32, saving more than 50%.

Conservation & Sustainability

The Rise Of The Repair Movement Is An Antidote To Dangerous Overconsumption

The Rise Of The Repair Movement Is An Antidote To Dangerous Overconsumption

When I arrive, the ground floor is buzzing with activity.
We can buy cheaply and replace often, and it’s not always in companies’ interests to make products long-lasting or easily fixable.
So stuff gets chucked in the trash.
Consumer movements are arguing for the right to fix their own gadgets, either by themselves or through third-party repairers, and not be held hostage by manufacturers.
That starts by removing barriers to keeping and maintaining it.” The U.S. grassroots repair movement has traditionally been more fragmented than the U.K.’s, but that’s starting to change, says Janet Gunter, co-founder of U.K. repair charity The Restart Project.
“Blocking small companies from the ability to make their own repairs prevents them from being able to support whatever their customers want fixed, and is just a ruse to sell new products,” says Gay Gordon-Byrne, executive director of The Repair Association, an umbrella organization of businesses, charities and individuals that want or need to be able to repair.
Some small businesses are pushing back.
In 2017, Henrik Huseby, the owner of a small electronics repair shop in Norway, got a letter from Apple’s lawyers insisting he stopped using aftermarket iPhone parts to repair phones.
“If they see there’s real public appetite for change, then they’ll be more ambitious.” Organizations such as Restart, which helped organize the event I went to in Hackney Wick, are well aware of the power communities have to drive change.
“The game-changer will come when companies realize that making better, more easily repairable products is just inevitable.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Wind turbine infrasound as a weapon

Wind turbine infrasound as a weapon

Description: Industrial wind turbine infrasound is not the best weapon, but it is a weapon.
This German video documents the harmful effects of the infrasound produced by industrial-sized wind turbines.
Step aside acres of solar panels.
There’s a new renewable energy source coming down the pike, and it has the potential to put the others out of business.
And, ironically, it’s the climate alarmists’ biggest demon.
Carbon sequestration, as the process is called, removes CO2 from the atmosphere and… Guest essay by Eric Worrall According to CNN we should remember global warming also causes global cooling, and that any confusion is the fault of the Republicans.
Is it climate change or global warming?
This, they… From The LA Times Home restaurant’s sprawling outdoor patio in Los Feliz, set under a canopy of large trees, was designed to take advantage of California’s temperate climate and typically sunny skies.
But this February has been so cold that the restaurant scrambled to set up extra heaters outside the Craftsman-style house to keep diners… This is a bit off-topic for this website, but I considered the fact that many of my readers are mature (far more so than the people we regularly criticize) and so I thought this might be uplifting for many who frequent here.
If you haven’t seen the most recent Clint Eastwood movie “The Mule”, you… From Dr. Roy Spencer’s blog, March 1st, 2019 by Roy W. Spencer, Ph.

Food & Water

Researchers create hydrogen fuel from seawater

Researchers create hydrogen fuel from seawater

Stanford researchers have devised a way to generate hydrogen fuel using solar power, electrodes and saltwater from San Francisco Bay.
The findings, published March 18 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, demonstrate a new way of separating hydrogen and oxygen gas from seawater via electricity.
Tackling corrosion As a concept, splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen with electricity — called electrolysis — is a simple and old idea: a power source connects to two electrodes placed in water.
During electrolysis, the nickel sulfide evolves into a negatively charged layer that protects the anode.
Without the negatively charged coating, the anode only works for around 12 hours in seawater, according to Michael Kenney, a graduate student in the Dai lab and co-lead author on the paper.
Previous studies attempting to split seawater for hydrogen fuel had run low amounts of electric current, because corrosion occurs at higher currents.
But they also designed a solar-powered demonstration machine that produced hydrogen and oxygen gas from seawater collected from San Francisco Bay.
And without the risk of corrosion from salts, the device matched current technologies that use purified water.
In the future, the technology could be used for purposes beyond generating energy.
Solar-driven, highly sustained splitting of seawater into hydrogen and oxygen fuels.

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Conservation & Sustainability

The Rise Of The Repair Movement Is An Antidote To Dangerous Overconsumption

The Rise Of The Repair Movement Is An Antidote To Dangerous Overconsumption

When I arrive, the ground floor is buzzing with activity.
We can buy cheaply and replace often, and it’s not always in companies’ interests to make products long-lasting or easily fixable.
So stuff gets chucked in the trash.
Consumer movements are arguing for the right to fix their own gadgets, either by themselves or through third-party repairers, and not be held hostage by manufacturers.
That starts by removing barriers to keeping and maintaining it.” The U.S. grassroots repair movement has traditionally been more fragmented than the U.K.’s, but that’s starting to change, says Janet Gunter, co-founder of U.K. repair charity The Restart Project.
“Blocking small companies from the ability to make their own repairs prevents them from being able to support whatever their customers want fixed, and is just a ruse to sell new products,” says Gay Gordon-Byrne, executive director of The Repair Association, an umbrella organization of businesses, charities and individuals that want or need to be able to repair.
Some small businesses are pushing back.
In 2017, Henrik Huseby, the owner of a small electronics repair shop in Norway, got a letter from Apple’s lawyers insisting he stopped using aftermarket iPhone parts to repair phones.
“If they see there’s real public appetite for change, then they’ll be more ambitious.” Organizations such as Restart, which helped organize the event I went to in Hackney Wick, are well aware of the power communities have to drive change.
“The game-changer will come when companies realize that making better, more easily repairable products is just inevitable.

Conservation & Sustainability

Fake hake: species frauds deterred by sustainability standards, study finds

Fake hake: species frauds deterred by sustainability standards, study finds

DNA barcoding of more than 1,400 seafood products certified as sustainable by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) has revealed that less than 1% were mislabelled, compared with an average of 30% across the sector as a whole.
The MSC is the international NGO that sets the standard for sustainable fishing around the world and its blue label – on products in store, on fresh fish counters and on restaurant menus – indicates that seafood has been sustainably caught and traced back to its source.
More than 300 fisheries in over 34 countries are certified to the MSC’s standard and more than 35,000 seafood products worldwide carry the label.
Hi-tech eco-labelling of certified fish products has been proven to be effective in stamping out seafood fraud across the world, according to research published on Tuesday.
The peer-reviewed findings, in the journal Current Biology, suggest that the MSC’s eco-labelling and monitoring of the supply chain are an effective deterrent to fraud.
“In the past, this has included some of the most loved species, such as cod, being substituted by farmed catfish, which can undermine consumer trust and efforts to maintain sustainable fisheries.” DNA methods have been widely used to detect species mislabelling, and a recent meta-analysis of 4,500 seafood product tests from 51 peer-reviewed publications found an average of 30% were not as stated on the label or menu.
In the present study – the largest and most comprehensive assessment of MSC-labelled products – it worked with laboratories of the Trace Wildlife Forensics Network and Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture‘s wildlife DNA forensic unit to identify the species in 1,402 MSC-certified fish products from 18 countries.
All mislabelling involved white fish (cod, hake, hoki) and flatfish products.
Rob Ogden, the head of conservation genetics at the University of Edinburgh and programme director of the Trace Wildlife Forensics Network, said: “The use of DNA tools to detect substitution in the fish supply chain until now essentially revealed a depressing story.
Our research flips this on its head and demonstrates how we can apply similar technology to validate the success of eco-labels in traceable, sustainable fishing.”

Conservation & Sustainability

Mayor Pete: 2020’s stealth climate candidate

Mayor Pete: 2020’s stealth climate candidate

for Pete’s sake Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, likes to imagine what America will look like in 2054, the year he’ll be 72, the same age as the current president.
His campaign is underpinned by the concern that young people today will likely be stuck with the problems created by older generations, especially climate change.
Midwestern sensibilities Two big floods hit South Bend in the past couple of years — floods that “should happen once in a lifetime, if that,” Buttigieg told me.
So when he thinks about climate change, he remembers a family on the porch of their flooded house in South Bend, the night before the first day of school.
So he prioritized “finding a cost-saving and environmentally-friendly solution to the stormwater problem,” said Therese Dorau, director of South Bend’s sustainability office.
He’s installed a couple of free electric vehicle chargers downtown and has spent millions on greener buildings, parks, trails.
“I think that anyone who uses the word ‘security’ in a 21st-century context had better be able to explain what they would be doing about climate change,” he said.
In previous presidential elections, Buttigieg might have had that issue all to himself.
“Unlike something like the Great Depression or World War II, this time we see it coming.
But the homegrown Indiana politician thinks that he can reach the Midwestern voters that coastal Democrats can’t.

Conservation & Sustainability

Enchanted forests: the women shaking up nature writing

Enchanted forests: the women shaking up nature writing

Zakiya Mckenzie, one of the Forestry Commission’s new writers in residence, can’t find her way to this nature reserve just west of Bristol.
Come to our meetings, in our space, and ask us, ‘What can we do?
She developed her love of green spaces staying with her grandmother in rural Jamaica.
I’m not going to tell the kids to be quiet to make everyone else feel comfortable.
As a black woman interested in writing about the woods, Mckenzie must also face the extremely white world of publishing.
“Publishing itself has its own problem with representation,” she says.
“I love all the different emotions you have in these narrative poems,” says Francis during a walk around a commission wood not far from her home in Petersfield, Hampshire.
“They are always about people, and I wanted to write about the forest in the same way.
“I find woods very comforting,” says Francis.
It’s a complete cycle of everything and that’s reassuring and calming.” The woods, says Mckenzie, “just remind me I’m so tiny compared to everything else and my problems today might not be the same problems tomorrow.

Conservation & Sustainability

It’s raining on Greenland’s ice sheet. That’s a big problem.

It’s raining on Greenland’s ice sheet. That’s a big problem.

oh sheet Changing weather patterns have triggered a stark change in how Greenland is melting, according to a new paper published on Thursday.
By combining data from satellites and weather stations, a team of scientists found that rainstorms are now driving nearly one-third of the frozen island’s rapid melt.
Those runoff events are increasingly tied to rainstorms — even during winter — that trigger extensive new ice melt.
“That was a surprise to see,” lead author Marilena Oltmanns of the Helmholtz Center for Ocean Research in Germany said in a statement.
The researchers looked at more than 300 sudden melt episodes from 1979 to 2012, the most recent year available.
Warmer air temperatures are having a big effect on Greenland, but warm water falling as rain is apparently disastrous to the ice — tunneling through divots and cracks and melting surrounding snow with abandon.
The rain-on-snow process transforms the surface of the ice sheet from fluffy and reflective to compact and dimmer, a dangerous feedback loop that’s perfect for encouraging further melt on sunny days.
“We are starting to realize, you have to look at all the seasons.” It seems increasingly clear that the Greenland ice sheet crossed a tipping point around 2002.
In the decade after that year, melting increased nearly four-fold, coming mostly from the southern part of the island that’s especially prone to these rain-on-ice events.
In recent decades, meltwater tied to rain events has doubled in the summer, and tripled in the winter — despite overall total volume of precipitation on the ice sheet remaining about the same.

Conservation & Sustainability

Ranger killed weeks after reopening of Virunga national park

Ranger killed weeks after reopening of Virunga national park

A forest ranger has been killed in Virunga national park in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, weeks after the reserve was reopened to tourists.
Virunga, home to critically endangered mountain gorillas as well as hundreds of other rare species, was shut for more than eight months for a review of security after a series of attacks on staff last year.
A statement from the park said the ranger, Freddy Mahamba Muliro, died during an attack on a ranger position in its central sector.
It gave no further details.
It is a tragedy that his young life has been cut short in dedicated service to Virunga.
Now more than ever, Ranger Freddy’s death highlights the very real threats to our rangers in their protection of Virunga national park,” said Emmanuel de Merode, the park’s director.
In May one of the many local militias, Mai Mai, attacked a vehicle carrying tourists from the city of Goma, about 30 miles from the park headquarters, to their accommodation.
A 25-year-old ranger was shot dead, a Congolese driver was wounded and two British tourists, Robert Jesty and Bethan Davies, were held by the militia overnight.
Following that attack, De Merode, a Belgian aristocrat, said the decision had been taken reluctantly to close Virunga to tourists to allow a thorough review of security precautions and reinforcement of the 700 rangers deployed to keep animals and visitors safe.
The park, located in the DRC’s North Kivu province, has a reputation as one of the most dangerous conservation projects in the world.

LATEST FROMClimate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change & Global Warming

The Green New Deal: Finally climate policy informed by science

The Green New Deal: Finally climate policy informed by science

However, when it comes to a safe climate, science and policy have operated in a vacuum.
The Green New Deal in Congress provides an opportunity for bringing both science and policy together in shaping a sustainable future for our nation that avoids a pending crisis to the planet’s life support systems if we do not act boldly and promptly.
“A great change in our stewardship of the earth and the life on it is required,” it stated, “if vast human misery is to be avoided.” Seven take-aways from the Green New Deal launch A second warning was issued in 2017 that the planet’s climate and natural systems were indeed worsening.
Aptly named a Green New Deal, it is as ambitious as president Roosevelt’s New Deal in the 1930s.
While there are gaps to be filled, by calling for carbon-free energy, clean air and clean water and an economic system that addresses inequalities, the proposal is the most comprehensive response yet to the scientists’ warnings.
It’s safe and easy to sign up.
Recent experience shows what can be accomplished in transforming the energy sector.
The energy sector’s carbon dioxide emissions dropped 28%, despite a rising population and a larger economy.
In sum, the Green New Deal is a means for leveraging these important outcomes.
William J. Ripple, PhD, distinguished professor of ecology, Oregon State University, was the lead author of the 2017 World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Wind turbine infrasound as a weapon

Wind turbine infrasound as a weapon

Description: Industrial wind turbine infrasound is not the best weapon, but it is a weapon.
This German video documents the harmful effects of the infrasound produced by industrial-sized wind turbines.
Step aside acres of solar panels.
There’s a new renewable energy source coming down the pike, and it has the potential to put the others out of business.
And, ironically, it’s the climate alarmists’ biggest demon.
Carbon sequestration, as the process is called, removes CO2 from the atmosphere and… Guest essay by Eric Worrall According to CNN we should remember global warming also causes global cooling, and that any confusion is the fault of the Republicans.
Is it climate change or global warming?
This, they… From The LA Times Home restaurant’s sprawling outdoor patio in Los Feliz, set under a canopy of large trees, was designed to take advantage of California’s temperate climate and typically sunny skies.
But this February has been so cold that the restaurant scrambled to set up extra heaters outside the Craftsman-style house to keep diners… This is a bit off-topic for this website, but I considered the fact that many of my readers are mature (far more so than the people we regularly criticize) and so I thought this might be uplifting for many who frequent here.
If you haven’t seen the most recent Clint Eastwood movie “The Mule”, you… From Dr. Roy Spencer’s blog, March 1st, 2019 by Roy W. Spencer, Ph.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Washington Times: “Tornado Drought” Impacting Democrat Climate Change Narrative

Washington Times: “Tornado Drought” Impacting Democrat Climate Change Narrative

Guest essay by Eric Worrall Nature refusing to play along with climate crisis narratives.
‘Tornado drought’ dampens Democrats’ climate-change narrative Bernie Sanders pushes climate-change narrative despite last year’s ‘tornado drought’ In the wake of last week’s deadly twister outbreak, Sen. Bernie Sanders declared that climate change is making tornadoes worse, to which the experts say: Not so fast.
Purdue University professor Ernest Agee, who has studied tornadoes for 50 years, said his research and that of other scientists shows that the number of violent U.S. tornadoes has in fact tapered off slightly in recent decades.
… What’s more, 2018 was the first year since record-keeping began in 1950 without an EF4 or EF5 tornado, the most devastating twisters, as rated on the Enhanced Fujita Scale from EF0 to EF5, according to the NOAA/NWS Storm Prediction Center.
“We’re definitely not seeing a trend of increase.
If anything, we’re seeing a decrease in the number of strong and violent tornadoes,” Mr. Agee said.
“And that’s in papers that I’ve published and my students and other colleagues that are prominent in the field.” … Climate change is inevitably blamed for any natural disaster, and Mr. Sanders led the charge following the deadly tornado, saying in a Facebook post, “The science is clear, climate change is making extreme weather events, including tornadoes, worse.
We must prepare for the impacts of climate change that we know are coming.” … “He [Sanders] references our study, which says that climate change is shifting eastward.
Move over wind farms.
Step aside acres of solar panels.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Environment community mourns victims of Ethiopian Airlines plane crash

Environment community mourns victims of Ethiopian Airlines plane crash

UN staff and delegates to the UN Environment Assembly, which opened in Nairobi on Monday, were among 157 to die on the way from Addis Ababa At least 22 UN staff died in an Ethiopian Airlines plane crash on Sunday, along with many delegates travelling to a major environment summit, according to officials.
“The environmental community is in mourning today,” she said in a statement released as she participated in the opening ceremony of the UN Environment Assembly in the Kenyan capital on Monday.
We lost UN staff, youth delegates travelling to the assembly, seasoned scientists, members of academia and other partners,” said Msuya.
The airline has grounded its fleet of Boeing 737 8 Max aircraft – the same model involved in a recent disaster in Indonesia.
UN offices lowered the organisation’s flag to half mast on Monday.
The Associated Press reported that 32 Kenyans were killed in the accident, nine Ethiopians, eighteen Canadians as well as multiple citizens from China, the US, Italy, France, the UK, Egypt, the Netherlands, India and Slovakia.
“The entire UN Environment Assembly will honour them in our efforts this week,” Msuya said.
The assembly aims to generate a sharper political focus on biodiversity, climate change and the natural systems that support human civilisation.
Global issues need global coverage CHN is dedicated to bringing you the best climate reporting from around the world.
It’s a huge job and we need your help.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Dr. Peter Ridd climate skeptic dismissal case finally heads to court

Dr. Peter Ridd climate skeptic dismissal case finally heads to court

My court case is scheduled for 26-28th March in Brisbane.
The main arguments of both sides have been submitted to the court and the James Cook University arguments will certainly make interesting reading when they become public during the hearing.
On a philosophical note, in my opinion JCU will lose the ethical argument even if they manage to win on some narrow legal definition.
If they win, it will mean that a judge has decided that a university has set up legally binding contracts that give them the power to effectively take away the right to intellectual freedom of an academic and silence him/her.
That would be something of a pyrrhic victory.
But without getting over-confident, I reckon the chances of us winning are considerably above average, so we will see.
For me the last few months waiting for the court case has been productively spent writing a book on the Great Barrier Reef.
It documents why it is actually in excellent shape, looks at all the supposed threats to the reef, and with one exception shows that they are massively exaggerated.
It documents some of the appalling “science” and explains how our science institutions, especially those of the Great Barrier Reef, have become so untrustworthy.
Thanks again for all the help, and we will let you know how it all develops.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Coalition’s climate policy reboot won’t do much for emissions, investor group warns

Coalition’s climate policy reboot won’t do much for emissions, investor group warns

Scott Morrison’s recent pivot on climate policy is unlikely to have a positive impact on Australia’s emissions profile because it fails to grapple with the underlying drivers of increased pollution, according to a new analysis by the Investor Group on Climate Change.
The IGCC, a group that represents institutional investors such as super funds, with total funds under management of about $2tn, has told its members Morrison’s “climate solutions package” won’t change the current trajectory of rising emissions because it is “small scale and unlikely to be a durable policy framework through time”.
“In the absence of this, policy uncertainty will be increased, the necessary investment in zero emissions generation will be delayed and upward pressure will continue on electricity prices,” the new paper warns.
The Morrison government is counting a 367-megatonne contribution from carry-over credits – an accounting system that allows countries to count carbon credits from exceeding their targets under the soon-to-be-obsolete Kyoto protocol periods against their Paris commitment for 2030 – to help meet the 2030 target.
The IGCC notes taht there is currently a gap between the targets that countries have set, and actions required to achieve the objectives of the Paris agreement.
“For investors this is concerning because the economic and social impacts of current projected levels of climate change risk investment returns and economic prosperity over the longer-term,” the paper says.
“The use of carryover to weaken Australia’s emissions commitments is also fundamentally at odds with limiting warming in line with the objectives of the Paris agreement and driving global momentum for coordinated, and increased ambition,” the paper says.
It says that if the ALP uses the same accounting as the government, factoring in a 367-megatonne contribution in its carbon budget, Labor’s 45% emissions reduction target would become a 35% target.
The safeguards mechanism – part of the Direct Action scheme, which is at the centre of Morrison’s recent climate redux – sets emissions “baselines”, or limits, for big polluters.
The mechanism is supposed to ensure pollution cuts paid for through the taxpayer-funded emissions reduction fund – rebadged by Morrison last week as the “climate solutions fund” – are not undone by a blowout in emissions in other parts of the economy.

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