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Climate Change & Global Warming

Caught Red-Handed: Google Search Suppresses Climate Realism

Caught Red-Handed: Google Search Suppresses Climate Realism

This language is inserted in the guidelines with only one purpose – to eliminate climate realism websites from the results, shown to Google Search users.
The recommended sources of the information confirm that a strong leftist bias of Google Search is by design.
The word consensus appears 18 times in both the current (May 2017) and the previous (March 2017) versions of the Guidelines.
should come from authoritative sources in those fields, must be factually accurate, and must represent scientific/medical consensus within those fields where such consensus exists.” (Section 6.5) “Before using the Fully Meets [user’s needs] rating for queries seeking a very specific fact or piece of information, you must check for accuracy and confirm that the information is supported by expert consensus where such consensus exists.” (Section 13.2) “All of the following should be considered either lowest quality MC or no MC [MC – Main Content]: No helpful MC at all or so little MC that the page effectively has no MC.
Misleading or inaccurate informational content about YMYL topics.
Pages with lowest quality MC should be rated Lowest.” (Section 7.4) Thus, pages containing what Google considers inaccurate content are rated as the lowest quality pages, “regardless their purpose or intent,” and regardless whether the allegedly inaccurate content does supposedly harm or just supposedly deceive the users!
Even if the manual reviews according to these Guidelines do not directly impact the ranking of websites, the Guidelines reflect the principles and aims of Google Search.
Google consumes as much or more energy as the entire city San Francisco, and falsely claims that 100% of it is renewable energy.
Remember last year’s headlines like Google Says It Will Run Entirely on Renewable Energy in 2017 (NY Times) and Google to be powered 100% by renewable energy from 2017 (The Guardian)?
Context is king when advocating for renewable energy policies, according to political science professor June 30, 2017 by Sonia Fernandez Credit: University of California – Santa Barbara The first rule of advocating for climate change-related legislation is:… Although he’s been running this blog as a labor of love for more than ten years, Anthony has never had more than a week or so off to relax and recharge.

Healthy Living

Treatment of Ammonia contaminated water in a nutshell

Treatment of Ammonia contaminated water in a nutshell

Whenever an industry discharges it’s effluents, it has to treat them first so that they don’t do any harm to the environment.
The treatment of wastewater is a multi-level process and there are many harmful chemicals that are separated during the process.
Ammonia is one of the chemicals that are specifically treated in this process and treating it has always been a challenge for any industry.
Treatment of water containing Ammonia Ammonia is generally treated using a biological process called nitrification.
In this process, nitrification bacteria are used to convert harmful Ammonia into harmless nitrates.
The discharged water is safe and it won’t have any bad effect on flora and fauna anymore.
Ammonia is treated in a large quantity and its treatment depends upon a large number of factors.
Factors affecting the treatment of Ammonia Large quantity of dissolved oxygen The reaction through which the bacteria convert Ammonia into nitrates requires a lot of Oxygen.
So, it is necessary to check the quantity of dissolved oxygen before nitrification.
Adequate temperature Like all the other processes, the process of nitrification also has an adequate temperature.

Wellness

How Cancer Helped Me Love My Body, Finally

How Cancer Helped Me Love My Body, Finally

That feeling soon became more than a feeling; it became my truth.
It wasn’t until about three years after that stressful day in the doctor’s office that I realized that my cancer actually helped me love my body.
I looked around at the life I was living and realized how radically different it was from the life that I used to live.
How, exactly, did cancer help me love my body?
Cancer taught me that is simply not true.
My experience with cancer made me realize that if my life could end at any moment, then I deserved to experience as much joy as possible in my body today.
It was then that I decided to shift my attention from looking good in my body to feeling good in my body.
In an effort to finally live a life of joy in my body after cancer and years of disordered eating, I began a process of self-reflection.
Most importantly, my quest for joy showed me that it is so much easier to love your body when you feel good in it.
And to feel good in your body you have to prioritize your own joy.

Wellness

The Real Impact Of Loneliness On Physical & Emotional Health + How To Start Building Authentic Intimacy

The Real Impact Of Loneliness On Physical & Emotional Health + How To Start Building Authentic Intimacy

The Real Impact Of Loneliness On Physical & Emotional Health + How To Start Building Authentic Intimacy.
Joshua wasn’t the cat.
Loneliness is a world epidemic.
If, out of worry or stress, we are constantly vigilant, the parasympathetic nervous system resents it.
At the park, at parties or in cafés, even at the supermarket, Anita found herself staring at other couples as they stroked each other with blades of grass, made out with their eyes closed, and as they checked off their shopping list.
Might her loneliness have scared people away?
Loneliness begets loneliness, in a cycle.
Fruit flies live longer if they experience social interaction.
When we feel anxious, it’s more difficult to remain hopeful.
On some days, Anita had her art as a consolation.

Conservation & Sustainability

Women carry more than their fair share of the world’s water

Women carry more than their fair share of the world’s water

Imagine going through your day without access to clean, safe water in your home for drinking, cooking, washing, or bathing whenever you need it.
An insufficient supply of safe and accessible water poses extra risks and challenges for women and girls.
Simply to get water for drinking, bathing, cooking and other household needs, millions of women and girls spend hours every day traveling to water sources, waiting in line and carrying heavy loads — often several times a day.
The new UNICEF/WHO report states that 263 million people worldwide have access to water sources that are considered safe, but need to spend at least 30 minutes walking or queuing to collect their water.
In a study of 25 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, UNICEF estimated that women there spent 16 million hours collecting water each day.
When children or other family members get sick from consuming poor-quality water, which can happen even if the water is initially clean when collected, women spend their time providing care.
The burden is even heavier for women who are pregnant or are also carrying small children.
A focus on women’s needs When communities initiate programs to improve access to water, it is critical to ask women about their needs and experiences.
Although women and girls play key roles in obtaining and managing water globally, they are rarely offered roles in water improvement programs or on local water committees.
Numerous water projects in developing countries have failed because they did not include women.

Wellness

Should We Be Buying Iodized Salt?

Should We Be Buying Iodized Salt?

Should We Be Buying Iodized Salt?.
How important is iodized salt to the American or European diet?
According to the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Dietary Supplements, tests have shown that the population in the United States is “iodine sufficient.” Most Americans who eat a varied diet get enough iodine even if they don’t use iodized salt.
They are at little risk of iodine deficiency, which can lead to goiters (swollen thyroid glands in the neck) and dwarfism and is a leading cause of mental impairment worldwide.
The need for iodine increases during pregnancy, and women who do not eat dairy products or do not take the vitamin supplements that doctors typically prescribe are at risk.
That’s why it is present in the grass that cows eat, which then shows up in cow’s milk and dairy foods.
Anyone who eats seaweed — meaning almost everyone who ever eats sushi — gets plenty of iodine.
No European country has severe iodine deficiency, but some have subpopulations — especially pregnant women — with levels low enough to be considered unhealthy.
Iodized salt is common in some countries but not in others.
Before the modern era allowed food to be transported long distances, mountainous countries and countries situated in flood plains typically had chronic iodine deficiency because melting snowpack and floodwaters tend to wash iodine out of the soil and local plants and animals had little iodine.

Wellness

These Are The Most In-Demand Airbnbs In The World Right Now

These Are The Most In-Demand Airbnbs In The World Right Now

These Are The Most In-Demand Airbnbs In The World Right Now.
Summer is in full swing, and the streets are abuzz with talk of beachy weekend trips and faraway adventures.
And while a terrace loft in Paris and family home near the River Thames are the summer’s most booked escapes, less-traditional lodging options are also gaining traction. “Trees,” “vans,” and “caves,” are just a few of the fantastical terms travelers are searching this year.
Situated in the Bauges mountainside, this yurt is an invitation to live a little simpler and get back to nature.
You’ll notice that the natural theme spills over into the bathroom with sustainable cork board backing the shower and air plants intermittently growing throughout,” this paradise in the jungle is about to move to the top of your bucket list.
($296/night) Cave in Santorini.
This plant-lover’s dream is immersed in a blooming garden, with huge windows that open out onto lush greenery, chickens, and glimpses of Amsterdam’s city center a few miles away.
($64/night) Atlanta Tree House.
Minutes from downtown Atlanta, this house tucked in the woods is complete with antique furnishings and an open floor plan that makes the indoors and outdoors collide.

Wellness

Vegan Ice Cream Enters a Golden Age

Vegan Ice Cream Enters a Golden Age

But with so many options, which plant-based milk, or combination of milks, makes the best homemade nondairy ice cream?
A few years ago, I experimented with ratios of cream, milk and eggs to create a master recipe for a custard ice cream base.
His hugely popular frozen orange coconut cream pop is as beloved by “people who have never even heard of veganism as it is by vegans,” he said.
Mr. Goetz advises home cooks looking to make nondairy ice cream out of coconut milk to add vanilla and sea salt.
“I’ve been chasing vegan ice cream for years,” he said, “and they are really hard to do well.” For a while, he was making his own Brazil nut milk to use as the base.
“The hemp milk gets the coconut flavor to relax,” he said.
“It’s rich enough to feel really creamy, but neutral enough not to interfere with any ingredients you want to add.” He’s used the coconut-hemp-almond mixture as a base for mint chip, coffee and various chocolate nondairy ice creams, and he is constantly coming up with new flavors to meet increasing demand.
Using high-fat, plant-based milks is one way to achieve creaminess in a nondairy ice cream.
Mr. Morgenstern suggests that home cooks substitute agave syrup or honey for some of the regular sugar in their nondairy ice cream bases.
Then when they taste it, they see that it can be just as good, or maybe even better than regular ice cream.” Recipes: Nondairy Ice Cream Base | How to Make Ice Cream Follow NYT Food on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Pinterest.

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Conservation & Sustainability

Women carry more than their fair share of the world’s water

Women carry more than their fair share of the world’s water

Imagine going through your day without access to clean, safe water in your home for drinking, cooking, washing, or bathing whenever you need it.
An insufficient supply of safe and accessible water poses extra risks and challenges for women and girls.
Simply to get water for drinking, bathing, cooking and other household needs, millions of women and girls spend hours every day traveling to water sources, waiting in line and carrying heavy loads — often several times a day.
The new UNICEF/WHO report states that 263 million people worldwide have access to water sources that are considered safe, but need to spend at least 30 minutes walking or queuing to collect their water.
In a study of 25 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, UNICEF estimated that women there spent 16 million hours collecting water each day.
When children or other family members get sick from consuming poor-quality water, which can happen even if the water is initially clean when collected, women spend their time providing care.
The burden is even heavier for women who are pregnant or are also carrying small children.
A focus on women’s needs When communities initiate programs to improve access to water, it is critical to ask women about their needs and experiences.
Although women and girls play key roles in obtaining and managing water globally, they are rarely offered roles in water improvement programs or on local water committees.
Numerous water projects in developing countries have failed because they did not include women.

Conservation & Sustainability

These 21 kids taking on Trump could be our best hope for climate action

These 21 kids taking on Trump could be our best hope for climate action

These 21 kids taking on Trump could be our best hope for climate action.
Juliana v. United States has a plot suitable for a Disney movie: An eclectic group of 21 kids (and their lawyers) fighting to save the world by forcing the federal government to adopt a science-based plan to reduce emissions.
Their lawsuit got a boost this past week when climate scientist James Hansen published a paper in support of their cause.
The time may be right for Juliana and other lawsuits like it to gather real momentum, paving the way for meaningful victories, says Michael Burger, executive director of the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia University.
It’s the culmination of years of legal strategizing by Our Children’s Trust, the advocacy group that helped organize the effort.
At the heart of this suit is the principle of intergenerational equity.
It’s sure to set a dramatic spectacle of the kids and their lawyers on one side of the room against representatives of the Trump administration on the other, with the future of the climate on the line.
“That’s why we need to take advantage of the fact that the judiciary is less subject to that pressure.” To be sure, the ultimate success of Juliana hinges on the composition of the Supreme Court, if the case makes it that far.
That fact makes Burger and his colleague, Michael Gerrard, less optimistic.
“As you can see from the global interest, it’s already had a real impact.

Conservation & Sustainability

Teeth to tail: 6 stories about sharks this week

Teeth to tail: 6 stories about sharks this week

Editor’s note: Shark Week 2017 kicks off in a couple of days, featuring everything from an Olympian racing a great white to our very own scientist’s exploration of “alien” species.
Before you dive in, take a look at six of Human Nature’s most popular shark stories — and scroll down to the end to see our Shark Week Photo Gallery.
Sharks help move carbon through the ocean — and they just might be the key to helping scientists cure certain diseases.
Whale shark watch: 4 things we’ve learned from tracking the world’s largest fish Conservation International scientists made headlines in 2015 when they launched a ground-breaking whale shark satellite tagging program in Indonesia.
Check back here next week for fresh updates.
Expedition to ‘island of sharks’ gathers hundreds of hours of new ocean data A team of 18 scientists made a 36-hour boat journey from Puntarenas, Costa Rica, to one of the world’s best dive sites: Cocos Island National Park.
Why ‘walking sharks’ are at greater risk for extinction than we thought Walking sharks are only active at night, when they emerge from hiding places to “walk” about the reef in search of food.
Here, a pioneer in the study of walking sharks describes key findings about the species.
Aliens of the deep: Deep-sea sharks are the hidden stars of Shark Week Step aside great whites and hammerheads: There’s a slew of little-known shark species that deserve more attention, such as the goblin and megamouth sharks.
Sign up for email updates.

Conservation & Sustainability

Who Charmed Whom?

Who Charmed Whom?

The Associated Press reports that French President Emmanuel Macron has been reminiscing about his meetings with Donald Trump, including their conversation about the Paris climate accord.
Let’s play along, however, and assume that Trump really is open to reentering the Paris accord if the U.S. commitment is to his liking.
Energy savings in federal agencies: Last March, President Trump ordered all federal agencies to improve government efficiency by identifying where they can eliminate unnecessary offices and programs.
The federal government is the nation’s biggest energy consumer.
Among other sustainability goals, it directed federal agencies to reduce their energy use 3% annually.
That goal is in line with President Trump’s objective to increase funding for U.S. forces.
Climate action by state and local governments: After President Trump withdrew from the Paris climate accord, an encouraging number of states and localities said they would help keep the United States’ original commitment to reduce carbon emissions 26% by 2025 compared to 2005.
An example is the Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Colorado.
Rather, he can focus on how the laboratory does joint research with American companies and offers technical assistance to states and localities.
A 30% improvement in U.S. energy productivity.

Conservation & Sustainability

Trump comms chief Anthony Scaramucci used to be right about climate. Not anymore.

Trump comms chief Anthony Scaramucci used to be right about climate. Not anymore.

Trump comms chief Anthony Scaramucci used to be right about climate.
Not anymore.. On Friday, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer resigned over the appointment of Scaramucci, a Wall Street executive and longtime supporter of President Trump.
Scaramucci’s Twitter history holds some surprises for a Trump appointee.
Case in point: You can take steps to combat climate change without crippling the economy.
The fact many people still believe CC is a hoax is disheartening Scaramucci called the science of climate change “pretty much irrefutable” in a June 2016 interview with a financial outlet and tweeted about climate action on multiple occasions last year.
But when Scarmucci joined Trump’s transition team following the election, a very curious transformation occurred.
In an appearance on CNN in December, Scaramucci noted that some scientists believe climate change is “not happening.” When the show’s host reminded him about the scientific consensus on the matter, Scaramucci countered that there was once “overwhelming science that the earth was flat.” We’ll wait and see if Scaramucci descends further into climate denial during his role as communications secretary, which begins in August.
And speaking of incoherence on climate change, here’s a grand performance to watch in memory of Spicer’s old job:

Conservation & Sustainability

A gold-standard test proves we can save forests with just a little money.

A gold-standard test proves we can save forests with just a little money.

A gold-standard test proves we can save forests with just a little money.. Here’s a simple way to match the priorities of rich environmentalists (saving forests and vulnerable species, like gorillas) with the needs of the poor (making a little more money): Pay people living near endangered forests not to cut them down.
The world has already promised to spend billions this way.
A new study of a cash-for-forest program attempts to answer that question.
Northwestern University economist Seema Jayachandran led a randomized, controlled trial — the gold standard for science — monitoring 60 villages in Uganda over two years.
People were cutting down trees around all the villages.
But they chopped down fewer in areas where villagers were paid $11.40 an acre per year not to.
It’s a great bang for the buck, if you measure in terms of keeping carbon out of the atmosphere — several times cheaper than other popular methods, like subsidizing solar panels.
“I came into this study expecting to be a wet blanket,” Jayachandran, told the New York Times.
“We were surprised the impacts were so large.” Everyone has their pet ideas for saving the world.
We need good evidence like this to figure out which ones work best.

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Climate Change & Global Warming

Caught Red-Handed: Google Search Suppresses Climate Realism

Caught Red-Handed: Google Search Suppresses Climate Realism

This language is inserted in the guidelines with only one purpose – to eliminate climate realism websites from the results, shown to Google Search users.
The recommended sources of the information confirm that a strong leftist bias of Google Search is by design.
The word consensus appears 18 times in both the current (May 2017) and the previous (March 2017) versions of the Guidelines.
should come from authoritative sources in those fields, must be factually accurate, and must represent scientific/medical consensus within those fields where such consensus exists.” (Section 6.5) “Before using the Fully Meets [user’s needs] rating for queries seeking a very specific fact or piece of information, you must check for accuracy and confirm that the information is supported by expert consensus where such consensus exists.” (Section 13.2) “All of the following should be considered either lowest quality MC or no MC [MC – Main Content]: No helpful MC at all or so little MC that the page effectively has no MC.
Misleading or inaccurate informational content about YMYL topics.
Pages with lowest quality MC should be rated Lowest.” (Section 7.4) Thus, pages containing what Google considers inaccurate content are rated as the lowest quality pages, “regardless their purpose or intent,” and regardless whether the allegedly inaccurate content does supposedly harm or just supposedly deceive the users!
Even if the manual reviews according to these Guidelines do not directly impact the ranking of websites, the Guidelines reflect the principles and aims of Google Search.
Google consumes as much or more energy as the entire city San Francisco, and falsely claims that 100% of it is renewable energy.
Remember last year’s headlines like Google Says It Will Run Entirely on Renewable Energy in 2017 (NY Times) and Google to be powered 100% by renewable energy from 2017 (The Guardian)?
Context is king when advocating for renewable energy policies, according to political science professor June 30, 2017 by Sonia Fernandez Credit: University of California – Santa Barbara The first rule of advocating for climate change-related legislation is:… Although he’s been running this blog as a labor of love for more than ten years, Anthony has never had more than a week or so off to relax and recharge.

Climate Change & Global Warming

MSM on Climate Hype: “the worst case is the only thing that prompts us to get anything done”

MSM on Climate Hype: “the worst case is the only thing that prompts us to get anything done”

Hyping extreme climate scenarios is sometimes the only way to motivate climate action.
Now that global warming is well underway, we are in for an apocalyptic awakening, and “parts of the Earth will likely become close to uninhabitable, and other parts horrifically inhospitable, as soon as the end of this century,” the writer, David Wallace-Wells, argues.
The article captured the public’s attention, quickly becoming the most-read piece in the magazine’s history.
Why feed the public a too-bleak picture of the future?
Why frighten people into action, rather than inspire them?
… One popular misconception about Y2K is that it was a wasted effort.
After all, when the clocks turned over on January 1, 2000, there were scattered problems, but the world didn’t end.
It is one thing to argue a position, an entirely different thing to deliberately distort the truth.
Climate change, of course, is real and demons… Guest essay by Eric Worrall The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit has rejected a motion to delay implementation of Obama era methane emission laws which limit allowed emissions from oil and gas drilling.
I’ll be running the blog for the… Submitted by Larry Hamlin A recent EIA report on energy production shows that wind and solar despite receiving tens of billions in government subsidies provided only 3.2% of U.S. energy in year 2016.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Some quick housekeeping

Some quick housekeeping

Some quick housekeeping.
I suggest these users use a WordPress log in with a valid email address.
And if you feel like using this post as an open thread, go ahead.
Last week TWTW discussed a paper by Santer, et al. that seems to support the view that, generally, global climate models greatly overestimate the warming of the atmosphere.… Guest essay by Eric Worrall h/t Man BearPig – A massive fire has ripped through a new building development in London, thankfully untenanted and still under construction.
Large blaze breaks out at brand new block of £1million flats in East London… May 04, 2017 | Ted Nordhaus […] This disturbing and memorable story has kept coming back to me the last few years, as a cadre of climate activists, ideologically motivated scholars, and sympathetic journalists have started labeling an ever-expanding circle of people they disagree with climate deniers.
Climate change, of course, is real and demons… Guest essay by Eric Worrall The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit has rejected a motion to delay implementation of Obama era methane emission laws which limit allowed emissions from oil and gas drilling.
Court rejects Trump’s delay of EPA drilling pollution rule BY TIMOTHY CAMA – 07/03/17 01:40 PM… From the Daily Caller Michael Bastasch 07/04/2017 A new study highlights how the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is able to game the rule-making system to cloak contentious policy decisions as based on science.
Susan Dudley, president of the George Washington University Regulatory Studies Center, and Marcus Peacock, executive vice president of the Business Roundtable, published… From Physorg and the “if we can just figure out how to conceal the taste with sugar” movement.
Context is king when advocating for renewable energy policies, according to political science professor June 30, 2017 by Sonia Fernandez Credit: University of California – Santa Barbara The first rule of advocating for climate change-related legislation is:… Although he’s been running this blog as a labor of love for more than ten years, Anthony has never had more than a week or so off to relax and recharge.
I’ll be running the blog for the… Submitted by Larry Hamlin A recent EIA report on energy production shows that wind and solar despite receiving tens of billions in government subsidies provided only 3.2% of U.S. energy in year 2016.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Shifting storms to bring extreme waves, seaside damage to once placid areas

Shifting storms to bring extreme waves, seaside damage to once placid areas

Sea level rise no longer the only impact climate change will bring to the world’s coastlines Public Release: 20-Jul-2017 University of New South Wales The world’s most extensive study of a major stormfront striking the coast has revealed a previously unrecognised danger from climate change: as storm patterns fluctuate, waterfront areas once thought safe are likely to be hammered and damaged as never before.
“What this study confirms, is that simply by changing direction, storms can be many times more devastating.
And that’s what we’re facing in many locations as the climate continues to change.” Ian Turner, director of WRL and a co-author, said sea level rise was no longer the only factor at play when preparing for the impact of climate change on waterfront areas.
This was similar to the amount of sand shifted on the U.S. east coast by Hurricane Sandy in 2012, the largest Atlantic hurricane on record, which killed 233 people and caused US$75 billion in damage.
Despite creating near hurricane-force winds, intense rain and large ocean waves of up to 9 meters, they are less worrisome to many people.” Narrabeen Beach in Sydney experienced the most erosion seen in 40 years of monitoring – and 36% greater than the second-most erosive event in May 1997.
It would also provide a crucial insight into how climate change will interact with the long cycles of El Niño and La Niña, and predict coastal vulnerability from sea level rise and changing storm patterns in the decades ahead, said senior lecturer Kristen Splinter, an engineer and modelling specialist at WRL who deep-dives into the data to build predictive tools.
“It will also be pivotal in understanding the future effect of climate change on coastal variability around the world.” Turner agreed: “This isn’t just about protecting beaches: billions of dollars’ worth of city infrastructure around the world is threatened by coastal erosion: buildings, roads, power and water utility corridors, sewerage lines – and this will only worsen as sea levels rise, causing storm tides to do more damage and reach deeper inland.” ### The WRL team collected the reams of data with the help of staff from the New South Wales Office of Environment and Heritage and worked with UNSW’s School of Aviation.
UNSW’s Faculty of Engineering is the powerhouse of engineering research in Australia, comprising of nine schools, 32 research centres and participating or leading 10 Cooperative Research Centres.
UNSW itself and is ranked #1 in Australia for producing millionaires (#33 globally) and ranked #1 in Australia for graduates who create technology start-ups.
The Week That Was: 2017-07-01 (July 1, 2017) Brought to You by SEPP (www.SEPP.org) The Science and Environmental Policy Project THIS WEEK: By Ken Haapala, President Climategate 2017?

Climate Change & Global Warming

California is handling climate change all wrong – Bjorn Lomborg

California is handling climate change all wrong – Bjorn Lomborg

While the L A Times is busy hyping Governor Brown’s success in extending its expensive and bureaucratically onerous cap and tax law from 2020 to 2030 Bjorn Lomborg director of the Copenhagen Consensus Center has an article in the Times showing how California’s climate alarmist schemes are incredibly wrong.
Further Lomborg exposes the terrible costs that Californian’s will pay now and in the coming years while failing to achieve any worthwhile global benefits.
Lomborg believes that California’s climate alarmist scheme’s driven by Governor Brown are misguided and that the state should instead take a more realistic and productive approach to address its climate concerns.
“California is embracing huge costs while doing virtually nothing for the environment.
If, instead, California were to develop green technologies so cheap they could actually outcompete fossil fuels, the whole world would switch to them.” The Week That Was: 2017-07-01 (July 1, 2017) Brought to You by SEPP (www.SEPP.org) The Science and Environmental Policy Project THIS WEEK: By Ken Haapala, President Climategate 2017?
Witnesses suggest the fire appears to have been concentrated around the building’s solar panels.
Large blaze breaks out at brand new block of £1million flats in East London… May 04, 2017 | Ted Nordhaus […] This disturbing and memorable story has kept coming back to me the last few years, as a cadre of climate activists, ideologically motivated scholars, and sympathetic journalists have started labeling an ever-expanding circle of people they disagree with climate deniers.
Climate change, of course, is real and demons… Guest essay by Eric Worrall The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit has rejected a motion to delay implementation of Obama era methane emission laws which limit allowed emissions from oil and gas drilling.
Susan Dudley, president of the George Washington University Regulatory Studies Center, and Marcus Peacock, executive vice president of the Business Roundtable, published… From Physorg and the “if we can just figure out how to conceal the taste with sugar” movement.
I’ll be running the blog for the… Submitted by Larry Hamlin A recent EIA report on energy production shows that wind and solar despite receiving tens of billions in government subsidies provided only 3.2% of U.S. energy in year 2016.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Our Favorite DAIRY FREE Ice Cream!

Our Favorite DAIRY FREE Ice Cream!

Our Favorite DAIRY FREE Ice Cream!.
Indulging in your favorite ice cream flavor is one of the best ways to cool down on a hot summer day.
This year’s nut milk craze has led to some pretty tasty dairy-free options.
Here are our top five vegan ice creams this season.
Pressed Juicery Freeze A delicious soft-serve vegan and gluten-free treat that uses only fruits, vegetables, almonds and coconuts as ingredients.
Depending on the location, you can choose from strawberry almond, vanilla, chocolate or matcha.
Their signature ice creams are made with coconut milk and a blend of organic, natural sweeteners.
Coconut Bliss This deliciously dairy-free coconut milk ice cream is sold by the pint and can be found in a store near you.
Flavors to choose from include cinnamon chocolate bliss, chocolate chip cookie, salted caramel & chocolate, vanilla island, dark chocolate, chocolate peanut butter, naked coconut, chocolate walnut brownie, chocolate hazelnut fudge, mint galactica, mocha maca crunch, ginger cookie caramel, cappuccino, cherry amaretto, and summer berry swirl.
All ingredients are certified vegan, gluten-free and Non-GMO.

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