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Climate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending February 23, 2018

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending February 23, 2018

Our subjects today entail the use of crushed rocks on farmland, a carbon tax in Singapore, the genetics of songbirds,

Wellness

Best Calming Music Tracks to Fall Asleep To

Best Calming Music Tracks to Fall Asleep To

Everyone’s sleep routine is a little bit different. Some people need it to be absolutely freezing and pitch black to

Energy

A fracking sand shortage could put a pause on the US shale boom

A fracking sand shortage could put a pause on the US shale boom

A muddled shale supply chain is pushing up costs for shale producers, also slowing the production boom.
Watch for Haliburton to be an indicator of what is to come in oil markets.
Halliburton said last week that its earnings could be negatively impacted because of bottlenecks related to the supply of frac sand used in shale drilling.
The reason, he said, was because of delays by Canadian rail companies that would slow the delivery of frac sand.
The FT reported that frac sand could cost $120 per short ton on at the Texas well head in 2017, essentially triple what it costs at the mine in the northern U.S. That led to new investment in frac sand mining in Texas, where “brown sand” could be produced.
The quality was not as good, with finer grains, but Texas brown sand could cost a third less than its northern cousin, and it is located much closer to drilling operations.
The price of sand escalated over the last few months of 2017,” Jeff Miller, Halliburton’s President and CEO, told investors on an earnings call in January. “[B]ut I believe that increasing sand capacity, particularly from localized mines combined with our supply chain strategy will reduce the cost throughout 2018.”
Therefore, sand cost should go down in 2018 as regional sand mines come on line and capacity is increased,” Halliburton’s CEO Jeff Miller said last month.
But Halliburton’s warnings indicate some near-term problems for shale drillers.

Conservation & Sustainability

Debt for dolphins: Seychelles creates huge marine parks in world-first finance scheme

Debt for dolphins: Seychelles creates huge marine parks in world-first finance scheme

The tropical island nation of Seychelles is to create two huge new marine parks in return for a large amount of its national debt being written off, in the first scheme of its kind in the world.
The novel financial engineering, effectively swapping debt for dolphins and other marine life, aims to throw a lifeline to corals, tuna and turtles being caught in a storm of overfishing and climate change.
The new marine plan bans fishing around biodiversity hotspots, keeping them healthy and better able to resist climate change.
Sources: Seychelles government, MEECC Geodatabase, The Nature Conservancy, ESRI TNC also raised $5m from donors to pay off part of the debt and cut the interest rate charged to the Seychelles government on the outstanding loan.
“The Seychelles is positioning itself as a world leader in ocean governance,” says environment minister, Didier Dogley.
But Seychelles vice-president, Vincent Meriton, says the military base will have to pass environmental assessments and will actually benefit protection, by enabling better surveillance around the isolated Aldabra archipelago: “This facility will allow us to better monitor.
Despite the election of Donald Trump scuppering for now planned swaps of US debt for Palau and the Marshall Islands in the Pacific, Weary is confident debt swaps for marine conservation are going to grow: “In the next three to five years we could potentially do a billion dollars of these deals.
We have a sight line to that.” “All eyes are on us to see whether it works,” says Sims.
The Seychelles, which is 99% ocean, will have gone from 0.04% to 30% protected area in a few years if it does.
But environment minister Dogley says: “We don’t have answers for everything now but the marine spatial plan has started the process of thinking about these things – before we were not.

Organic Living

What’s the Greenest Way to Travel the World?

What’s the Greenest Way to Travel the World?

On the other, you don’t want the environment to suffer as a result of your personal travels.
You should, however, choose what travel experts would classify as “green destinations.” By visiting green destinations, you’re essentially infusing money into economies that prioritize environmentalism.
This infographic from 1BOG shows the carbon footprint for various travel methods.
If you’re traveling a long distance — more than 2,500 miles — a bus is your most eco-friendly option.
Since this rarely possible with international travel, you’ll be happy to know that airplanes are the second most efficient way to move around.
On the other end of the spectrum, driving an SUV is the least efficient method of travel.
Whether you’re in the rain forests of Costa Rica or the bustling streets of Copenhagen, there are ample opportunities to reduce, reuse and recycle.
See the World in Green We live in a global society.
Despite this “connection,” there still isn’t a perfect way to travel the world and see creation firsthand without leaving your carbon footprint behind.
Do this and you’ll find your travels to be both green and rewarding.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Standing Rock is everywhere: one year later

Standing Rock is everywhere: one year later

One year after the closing of the camp at the Standing Rock Reservation, Standing Rock is everywhere.
When we say “Mni Woc’oni” — Water of Life — people all over the world are now beginning to understand that it is a living spirit: it can heal when you pray with it and die if you do not respect it.
In April 2016, after receiving concerns about the construction of an oil pipeline, I was invited to Sacred Stone Camp at the northeastern border of the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota to assist with a water ceremony.
Later that month, our indigenous youth set out on foot to run from the Standing Rock Reservation to Washington D.C. in an attempt to bring attention to the poisonous bitumen oil pipeline coming through our treaty territory.
Our traditional Elders asked all nations to join us and stand in prayer.
The closing of the camp at Standing Rock a year ago and the continued construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline has been a great disappointment.
What happened at Standing Rock has awakened many of my own people, and people across the world.
Standing Rock has marked the beginning of an international movement that will continue to work peacefully, purposefully, and tirelessly for the protection of water along all areas of poisonous oil pipelines and across all of Mother Earth.
When the environment that we live in is sick and suffering, so too are the minds and decisions of our leaders.
In a Sacred Hoop of Life, there is no ending and no beginning.

Food & Water

Standing Rock is everywhere: one year later

Standing Rock is everywhere: one year later

One year after the closing of the camp at the Standing Rock Reservation, Standing Rock is everywhere.
When we say “Mni Woc’oni” — Water of Life — people all over the world are now beginning to understand that it is a living spirit: it can heal when you pray with it and die if you do not respect it.
In April 2016, after receiving concerns about the construction of an oil pipeline, I was invited to Sacred Stone Camp at the northeastern border of the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota to assist with a water ceremony.
Later that month, our indigenous youth set out on foot to run from the Standing Rock Reservation to Washington D.C. in an attempt to bring attention to the poisonous bitumen oil pipeline coming through our treaty territory.
Our traditional Elders asked all nations to join us and stand in prayer.
The closing of the camp at Standing Rock a year ago and the continued construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline has been a great disappointment.
What happened at Standing Rock has awakened many of my own people, and people across the world.
Standing Rock has marked the beginning of an international movement that will continue to work peacefully, purposefully, and tirelessly for the protection of water along all areas of poisonous oil pipelines and across all of Mother Earth.
When the environment that we live in is sick and suffering, so too are the minds and decisions of our leaders.
In a Sacred Hoop of Life, there is no ending and no beginning.

Wellness

This Is What It’s Like to Watch Someone Else Deliver Your Baby

This Is What It’s Like to Watch Someone Else Deliver Your Baby

← Use Arrows Keys → Kim Overton is a very determined woman.
In 2005, after she was diagnosed with fibroid tumors — abnormal growths that develop in or on the uterus — her doctors told the 34-year-old personal trainer that her window to have children was closing.
She underwent a successful surgery removing 11 tumors and decided not to let the fact that she was single stop her from becoming a mother.
By this point, however, her window for another child was all but shut.
After one too many negative pregnancy tests, she came to terms that she wouldn’t be pregnant again.
Overton said with a laugh to POPSUGAR.
From there, the surrogacy process was painfully slow.
In July 2015, when Cydnee became pregnant a second time, Overton was “cautiously optimistic.”
Of Cydnee’s pregnancy, Overton admitted that “oddly enough,” it felt very normal.
It had taken three long years of epic highs and painful lows, but it culminated in a quick birth and an instant bond when Overton finally met her newborn son, Oliver.

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LATEST FROMConservation & Sustainability

Conservation & Sustainability

Debt for dolphins: Seychelles creates huge marine parks in world-first finance scheme

Debt for dolphins: Seychelles creates huge marine parks in world-first finance scheme

The tropical island nation of Seychelles is to create two huge new marine parks in return for a large amount of its national debt being written off, in the first scheme of its kind in the world.
The novel financial engineering, effectively swapping debt for dolphins and other marine life, aims to throw a lifeline to corals, tuna and turtles being caught in a storm of overfishing and climate change.
The new marine plan bans fishing around biodiversity hotspots, keeping them healthy and better able to resist climate change.
Sources: Seychelles government, MEECC Geodatabase, The Nature Conservancy, ESRI TNC also raised $5m from donors to pay off part of the debt and cut the interest rate charged to the Seychelles government on the outstanding loan.
“The Seychelles is positioning itself as a world leader in ocean governance,” says environment minister, Didier Dogley.
But Seychelles vice-president, Vincent Meriton, says the military base will have to pass environmental assessments and will actually benefit protection, by enabling better surveillance around the isolated Aldabra archipelago: “This facility will allow us to better monitor.
Despite the election of Donald Trump scuppering for now planned swaps of US debt for Palau and the Marshall Islands in the Pacific, Weary is confident debt swaps for marine conservation are going to grow: “In the next three to five years we could potentially do a billion dollars of these deals.
We have a sight line to that.” “All eyes are on us to see whether it works,” says Sims.
The Seychelles, which is 99% ocean, will have gone from 0.04% to 30% protected area in a few years if it does.
But environment minister Dogley says: “We don’t have answers for everything now but the marine spatial plan has started the process of thinking about these things – before we were not.

Conservation & Sustainability

Can You Ever Have Too Many Turkeys?

Can You Ever Have Too Many Turkeys?

Especially so in states like Oregon, where the turkey is not a native species.
Conservation non-profit Greenbelt Land Trust (Greenbelt) hosts a citizen science turkey count at Bald Hill Farm Conservation Area (Bald Hill Farm).
How Did Turkeys Get to Oregon?
According to Kelly Walton, a Game Bird Biologist for ODFW who joined us for the count, turkeys in the state are managed for balance.
Counting the Turkeys of Bald Hill Farm Bald Hill Farm currently has an estimated population of around 150 Rio Grande turkeys.
My group has an area near the shed, near where I saw turkeys before the count began.
All groups have now returned to the shed and get to enjoy the spectacle – I don’t envy the group that had to count such a large moving flock.
The results of the citizen science count and other turkey observations may impact the future management of turkeys on Bald Hill Farm.
To be clear, Greenbelt Land Trust has been monitoring the Oregon vesper sparrow population at Bald Hill Farm and, so far, there is no evidence of turkey predation.
Turkeys may also be eating rare plant seeds used in habitat restoration projects on Bald Hill Farm.

Conservation & Sustainability

How the mainstream media got played by Trump

How the mainstream media got played by Trump

And outlets from Time to CNN cited the hoax claim and tried to make sense of Trump’s nonsensical climate views.
That year, broadcast networks spent way too little time on climate change overall and completely failed to report during the campaign on what a Trump win would mean for climate change.
That’s crowding out reporting on other, more critical climate-related news, from how the Trump administration is aggressively dismantling climate protections to how climate change makes hurricanes and wildfires more dangerous.
When asked to clarify Trump’s views on climate change, she said more than once that he “believes the climate is changing” and “he believes pollutants are part of that equation.” Haley was employing Republicans’ favorite obfuscation technique on climate change — what savvy observers call “lukewarm” climate denial.
But ABC News completely fumbled the story.
Other networks and outlets have made similar mistakes, failing to properly identify the Trump team’s lukewarm climate denial and put comments in context.
Like when The Associated Press declared, “Trump changes his tune on climate change,” though in fact he had done no such thing, as Grist pointed out at the time.
A new Media Matters analysis found that when corporate broadcast TV news reported on climate change last year, they spent 79 percent of the time on statements or actions by the Trump administration — and even that included little coverage of efforts to roll back the Clean Power Plan and other climate regulations.
And in a year when hurricanes and other forms of extreme weather hammered the U.S., the networks hardly ever mentioned climate change in their coverage of those disasters.
Instead of trying to analyze Trump’s well-established refusal to accept climate science, media should be telling stories of how climate change is happening here and now, how it’s affecting real people, and how the EPA and other agencies are ripping up climate regulations.

Conservation & Sustainability

The World is Singing on BeastBox

The World is Singing on BeastBox

Bird songs have inspired artists likely since before recorded history.
Whale songs swept the world in 1970, inspiring musicians and conservationists alike.
Now Ben Mirin, a sound artist and National Geographic Explorer, has teamed up with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology to inspire a new generation of conservationists and musicians with BeastBox.
BeastBox gives you the chance to make your own beats using music and sound effects recorded by Mirin.
If I can ignite that passion in somebody else, I’ve achieved my goal.” The project came together when Mirin performed at Cornell.
It’s an ode to the music of the planet.” Make Your Own Beats The game starts with beatbox beats inspired by six ecosystems, from the Great Barrier Reef to the Sonoran Desert.
Add up to five animals at a time to the dance floor to watch them dance and hear them make music together.
Then went through a cultural review with Ben Ortiz of Cornell’s Hip Hop Collection and he made sure the costumes matched the cultural context.” Get Inspired “I learn the most by presenting to people outside of conservation,” Mirin says.
Some will enjoy playing around with the beats and others will get into the puzzle and want to unlock more.
“Kids were really puzzling out what animals would live in what ecosystem,” Thompson recalls.

Conservation & Sustainability

Californian Falls To His Death From Cliff Trying To Rescue His Dog

Californian Falls To His Death From Cliff Trying To Rescue His Dog

A California man died Monday after plunging from an ocean cliff south of San Francisco while trying to save his dog.
The unidentified 67-year-old was hiking with his dog shortly before noon above Thornton State Beach in Daly City when the animal went over the edge and became stranded on a ledge.
As his owner began making his way down to help the dog, a shepherd mix, the man slipped and fell about 500 feet, National Park Service officials said.
The dog owner was in grave condition when firefighters reached him, and he died of his injuries at the scene, according to a statement from the California Highway Patrol.
His body was airlifted by a CHP helicopter.
The dog, who watched from a cliff ledge as rescuers transported his owner’s body to the helicopter, was finally coaxed to safety by the dead man’s son, who had been called to the scene, reported Fox2 News.
The dog was uninjured.
The National Park Service warned that people should not attempt to save their dogs from cliffs or the surf.
Dogs often survive dangerous situations while humans may not.
Thornton Beach and the nearby Palisades Park are popular with hikers and dog walkers, but the area can be dangerous — particularly in cold and windy conditions, like the weather Monday.

Conservation & Sustainability

The Pileated Woodpecker in Winter

The Pileated Woodpecker in Winter

A notable exception is the pileated woodpecker, one of our most frequently spotted species on these outings.
Pileated woodpeckers are notably elusive birds.
The woodpeckers go to great lengths to extract these ants.
They pound out large, square holes in soft, dead wood.
Why are pileated woodpeckers so noticeable on a Rocky Mountain winter day?
If a dead tree is still standing, you will probably find the same pair foraging there.
(There is a report of more than 100 pygmy nuthatches piling into a hole in a dead pine tree on a particularly cold night).
Pileated woodpeckers forage on standing dead trees, fallen trees and stumps.
Dead trees were part of The Nature Conservancy’s forest conservation planning in North Idaho, and I saw these dead trees even on industrial timber land.
Pileated woodpeckers are found in a variety of forest habitats in North America, not just the ponderosa pine ecosystem of the Rockies.

LATEST FROMClimate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending February 23, 2018

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending February 23, 2018

Our subjects today entail the use of crushed rocks on farmland, a carbon tax in Singapore, the genetics of songbirds,

Climate Change & Global Warming

Standing Rock is everywhere: one year later

Standing Rock is everywhere: one year later

One year after the closing of the camp at the Standing Rock Reservation, Standing Rock is everywhere.
When we say “Mni Woc’oni” — Water of Life — people all over the world are now beginning to understand that it is a living spirit: it can heal when you pray with it and die if you do not respect it.
In April 2016, after receiving concerns about the construction of an oil pipeline, I was invited to Sacred Stone Camp at the northeastern border of the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota to assist with a water ceremony.
Later that month, our indigenous youth set out on foot to run from the Standing Rock Reservation to Washington D.C. in an attempt to bring attention to the poisonous bitumen oil pipeline coming through our treaty territory.
Our traditional Elders asked all nations to join us and stand in prayer.
The closing of the camp at Standing Rock a year ago and the continued construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline has been a great disappointment.
What happened at Standing Rock has awakened many of my own people, and people across the world.
Standing Rock has marked the beginning of an international movement that will continue to work peacefully, purposefully, and tirelessly for the protection of water along all areas of poisonous oil pipelines and across all of Mother Earth.
When the environment that we live in is sick and suffering, so too are the minds and decisions of our leaders.
In a Sacred Hoop of Life, there is no ending and no beginning.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Documents reveal UK push to water down EU biomass regulations

Documents reveal UK push to water down EU biomass regulations

The win for Whitehall’s lobby offensive – in alliance with Poland and Spain – was pushed through in a ministerial revision to the renewable energy directive in December.
This was because the proposal tolerated the cutting down and burning of whole trees, a process that releases more CO2 into the atmosphere than replanted trees can absorb for decades, if not centuries.
Greenpeace’s chief UK scientist Doug Parr told CHN: “The UK government knows this energy source could backfire and has cooled on providing fresh subsidies, yet they are trying to lobby the EU to make it easier to burn more wood.
If ministers really want Britain to be a climate leader, they should back unambiguously clean renewable technologies like solar and wind that really help tackle climate change.” The directive still needs to be approved by the European Parliament, Commission and Council in a trilogue process that could take up to a year.
But even this assumption is wildly optimistic, according to a study published in Environmental Research Letters today, which provides a new model for calculating the net emissions impact of burning wood pellets made only from residues, and not whole trees.
Because burned pellets emit carbon at a faster speed than decomposing forest material, the paper finds that burning them creates more net emissions – when measured against their “alternative fate” as decomposing twigs and branches.
Wood burning power plants account for the majority of Europe’s renewable energy production and are as eligible for renewable energy subsidies as wind or solar power.
The pellets they burn are often made from felled whole trees, but the paper finds that even when “true” wood wastes are assumed, up to 95% of the cumulative pollution represents a net addition to the atmosphere over decades.
“Drax and other power plants burning wood pellets emit as much or more CO2 per megawatt-hour as when they burn coal, but they get to avoid carbon trading fees for biomass emissions,” Booth said.
Drax’s biomass units deliver carbon savings of more than 80% compared to when they used coal – this is independently audited.” A separate study released by the International Renewable Energy Association and European Commission on Monday found that the EU could cost-effectively double its deployment of biomass by 2030.

Climate Change & Global Warming

10 Reasons Why Your Pet Still Has Fleas

10 Reasons Why Your Pet Still Has Fleas

If the trap isn’t catching fleas within 48 hours, move to a different location near another hotspot.
Not Treating Often Enough Fleas go through a life cycle of egg, larvae, pupae, and adult.
Most flea treatments just kill adult fleas, but fleas can continue to emerge for months after you think an infestation has ended.
Whether you are using a natural flea treatment or not, a regular regimen is necessary to combat fleas.
Since 95% of the flea’s life is spent outside the adult stage, flea infestations can take a long time to eradicate.
Don’t buy flea treatments from the pet store until you have consulted with your veterinarian to discuss the right treatment for your animal.
Combing, proper grooming, and household cleanliness goes a long way, but getting tough with vacuuming, flea traps, and diatomaceous earth is more effective.
Treat all your pets’ beds and resting/sleeping areas.
They should be vacuumed frequently and if possible, steam cleaned to kill eggs.
You can also treat your carpet using food-grade diatomaceous earth.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Tasmania to reach 120% renewable electricity in five years, Labor pledge

Tasmania to reach 120% renewable electricity in five years, Labor pledge

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In a statement released on Friday, ahead of the March 3 state election, Labor leader Rebecca White said her party would – if elected – “restore” and capitalise on the Australian state’s renewable electricity advantage, with a range of new policy measures and targets.
Chief among these are a target of “more than 120% renewables” within five years, and a “Distributed Energy Target” to boost on-site installations like rooftop solar by more than 80% by 2022.
Of course, for Tasmania, a 120% target is not as impressive as it sounds – the state regularly generates 100% renewable electricity from its ample hydropower resources, and also exports to Victoria.
But White said the 120% target was designed to make Tasmania the renewable energy “powerhouse” of Australia, allowing it to sell its excess hydro, wind and solar energy interstate – and in this way boosting the case for a second Bass Strait interconnector to Victoria.
“Not one major renewable energy project has been completed in the past four years,” White said on Friday.
“In contrast, Labor would create a more diverse energy generation system to reduce power bills, protect our energy intensive industries, provide energy security in times of drought and enhance the case for a second Bass Strait interconnector.” Labor’s policy plan also promises to reinvest $25 million in dividends from TasNetworks to fund a range of initiatives to take advantage of technological advances in renewable energy generation and storage – presumably including battery storage and internet of things solutions to load shifting and peak shaving.
“A majority Labor government will work with TasNetworks to change the policy so that energy generated at one site can be used across all meters on the same property, provided it is used in real time.
“It is estimated the policy change could unlock more than $20m in direct on-farm investment.” The Labor policy also pledges to install solar and battery storage at every new public housing property built – up to 1000 installations over six years; and to create a virtual power plant of connected homes, businesses and government buildings that would contribute to the state’s energy security.
The Liberal party has also pledged it will withdraw Tasmania from the National Electricity Market, cutting all ties with mainland pricing mechanisms even though it will still export and import power over its sub-sea cable.

Climate Change & Global Warming

These are the best natural beauty balms for the winter

These are the best natural beauty balms for the winter

With Winter still in full swing, we are facing the annual epidemic of chapped and dry skin, lips and hair.
Trilogy Natural Skincare Everything Balm: A New Zealand based brand, Trilogy Natural Skincare is driven by discovery and innovation, and has pledged to only work with natural ingredients in order to create powerful and natural skincare for you.
Their multi-tasking Everything Balm is packed with rosehip, Echinacea and pawpaw—leaving you with nothing but pure plant oils to answer all of your beauty troubles.
This can be used as a body balm, lip balm, hand balm and even a cleansing balm.
Insead of using chemically filled makeup wipes, we recommend picking up a tub of the Farmacy Green Clean Makeup Meltaway Cleansing Balm.
Formulated without parabens, sulfates or phthalates, this is one of the cleanest and greenest balms out there.
Honest Company Magic Balm: From the company cultivated by none other than Jessica Alba herself, the Honest Company’s Magic Balm lives up to its name.
Great for applying to dry patches of skin anywhere on the body, this product can also be used as an enhancing beauty tool as well!
This is a hydrating, long-lasting, multipurpose balm and skin salve that is packed with antioxidants and natural emollients to nourish and repair dry chafed skin.
The perfect multi-usage moisturizer, this Organic Shea Butter will fix any issues from your lips, skin, elbows, feet, even to your hair!

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