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Climate Change & Global Warming

We should be glad the US is out of the Paris Climate Agreement

We should be glad the US is out of the Paris Climate Agreement

We should be glad the US is out of the Paris Climate Agreement.
Its members insist that they remain committed to Paris and are determined to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and prevent climate change.
Paul Driessen and David R. Legates Ten states, some 150 cities, and 1,100 businesses, universities and organizations insist “We are still in” – committed to the Paris climate agreement and determined to continue reducing carbon dioxide emissions and preventing climate change.
When Delaware signed on to WASI, for example, Governor Carney cited rising average temperatures, rising sea levels, and an increase in extreme weather events.
Surely, WASI members and the rest of the world have better uses for that money than chasing climate chimeras.
But in 150+ countries that are under no obligation under Paris to reduce their fossil fuel use, emissions will increase.
Expensive energy will hurt poor and minority families the most and send jobs to countries where energy costs less.
The United States reduced CO2 emissions by 12% between 2005 and 2015.
Governors who have committed their states to this climate-centered resistance movement have done so without approval from the legislature or their constituents.
With tax increase and soaring energy costs?

Healthy Living

bee balm: make room for monarda, with mt. cuba’s george coombs

bee balm: make room for monarda, with mt. cuba’s george coombs

Cuba Center native plant garden and research facility in Delaware, tested 40 different selections of Monarda over a three-year period, including plants from seven Eastern U.S. native species, and he shared results of which fare best on both scores in the hopes that more of us will make room and make more pollinators happy in the process.
cuba Subscribe: Q. We’ve talked before on the show about your past trials of other native plants like Baptisia and Heuchera—and native plants are the mission of Mt.
We do a lot of work promoting plants in a display capacity in the gardens itself, and then we also do research like what I do, trying to help gardeners pick better plants and kind of evaluate the options that are out there.
I looked back to check, and in my first garden book that I wrote in like 1989, I grouped it in what I call the “confidence booster” plants for new gardeners [laughter]–the ones that make you feel like you have a green thumb.
Really powdery mildew starts to show up when the plants are stressed, which is usually when the plants are flowering—not the best time to look at mildew.
One is Monarda ‘Dark Ponticum’ [above].
This is the only compact cultivar that did really well in our trial.
The reason that ‘Gardenview Scarlet’ did better in our trials is that it was slightly less prone to powdery mildew than ‘Jacob Cline.’ Now the interesting thing is that people say ‘Jacob Cline’ is completely mildew-free, but we didn’t find that; it got mildew moderately badly.
It has a very pale pink flower color, which I think is a nice kind of subtle flower color compared to other Monarda.
It looks very different from most other Monarda.

Healthy Living

Pallet Planter Ideas that Stylishly Bring Upcycling to Your Garden

Pallet Planter Ideas that Stylishly Bring Upcycling to Your Garden
Author: Stephanie Rose / Source: Garden Therapy Pallets have been a popular material for DIY planter projects for almost ten years now,
Conservation & Sustainability

These 10 Shocking Facts On Factory Farms and Water Pollution Will Make You Rethink That Burger

These 10 Shocking Facts On Factory Farms and Water Pollution Will Make You Rethink That Burger

These 10 Shocking Facts On Factory Farms and Water Pollution Will Make You Rethink That Burger.
These animals are subjected to lives in extreme confinement where they live in fear and pain.
The cruelty that these animals experience is rather well-known and understood, however, the negative environmental impact that raising this many animals causes is less so.
Animals raised for food produce approximately 130 times more waste than the entire human population combined.
When you concentrate these animals in massive factory farm facilities, it is incredibly difficult to keep these giant facilities clean without using a massive amount of water.
To run the flushing systems that clean excrement off the floors of dairy farms, 150 gallons of water are required per cow, every single day.
In fact, the majority of water used in factory farms does not go towards hydrating animals, but rather to cleaning and processing animals during slaughter.
Unfortunately, these cesspools are not iron-clad, spill proof facilities, but are prone to leaks.
Between these two factors, there is an extremely high likelihood that factory farm waste will end up in local water supplies.
To get an idea of what sort of damage factory farms are causing to our water supply, check out these shocking facts.

Climate Change & Global Warming

End of coal: Failure to see it coming will hurt miners most

End of coal: Failure to see it coming will hurt miners most

Workers must prepare for and move to new jobs, regional economic policy has to be redrawn and companies need to develop new business models.
For instance, from 1965 to 1990 the Limburg region of the Netherlands – a former coal mining heartland that employed more than 75,000 miners – was able to transition from coal mining to a relatively successful regional economic hub with new industrial activities, with most workers finding reemployment or retiring normally.
Almost everywhere, with the notable exception of Limburg, the failure to prepare and invest in economic alternatives for former mining regions has meant that regional unemployment in mining regions is often significantly higher than the national average.
In the UK, thirty years after the Thatcher government suddenly withdrew support for the industry, many mining regions still only count 50 jobs per hundred working age adults.
The social and economic costs of failing to adequately prepare and implement the transition while time and resources are available can therefore be very high.
These often resulted in poor long term outcomes for workers’ long term employability and health and for those of their children.
But the costs of failing to invest in the transition early enough are clearly much higher.
That’s before any investment in a transition away from coal.
Failure to invest sufficient resources and political will into a transition can lead to the development of extremely costly economic, social and environmental problems.
However, early anticipation, building consensus among key stakeholders early and investing in the future of workers and regions are vital ingredients of a just transition.

Conservation & Sustainability

The Southwest is burning

The Southwest is burning

The Southwest is burning.
This story was originally published by High Country News and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.
The National Weather Service currently has the region under heat warnings and excessive heat warnings.
Fifty-five fires have burned in Arizona and New Mexico alone.
Yellow pins indicate states where fewer than 10,000 acres are burning.
Click the pin for more details on number of fires, acreage burned, and active fires.
Nationally, wildfires have consumed more than 2.5 million acres of land so far this year.
In the past decade, more acreage burned by this point only once, in 2011.
That year, unusually hot, dry conditions led to several large conflagrations, including New Mexico’s Las Conchas Fire and Arizona’s Wallow Fire.
According to NIFC, suppression alone cost almost $2 billion last year.

Wellness

I Quit Sugar 2 Years Ago. Here Are 7 Ways It’s Totally Transformed My Life

I Quit Sugar 2 Years Ago. Here Are 7 Ways It’s Totally Transformed My Life

I Quit Sugar 2 Years Ago.
All week long, we shared tips, tricks, inspirational stories, and recipes to help you eliminate sugar for the week—and maybe much longer!
You can check out the rules of the challenge (and the 10 best tips for eliminating sugar), dive into whether fruit sugars are good for you, check out the no-sugar smoothie supermodels are obsessed with, hear a holistic psychiatrist’s tips for dealing with sugar withdrawal, get into the nitty gritty of sweeteners from stevia to coconut sugar, make some no-sugar desserts, or find out how to optimize your sleep to prevent sugar cravings.
I figured I’d cut back on it for a week, maybe two, and see if there was any validity to what sounded at the time like pretty extreme health claims.
My headaches went away, the cravings subsided, and I actually felt good.
Great, even, which got me thinking: if I could feel this way after two sugar-free weeks, what would I feel like after three weeks?
Turns out when I began steering clear of sugar, I also ended up avoiding most packaged goods in favor of real, whole, fibrous foods, chock-full of healthy fats.
It was actually around the end of month two when I began to notice changes.
If going through a period of extremes is necessary in order to shift to a mindset of moderation, I’m definitely still in the extremes stage.
And while sugar may not be the healthiest, neither is letting it (or any food, for that matter) dictate my relationships and distance me from the people in my life that mean so much more than any food ever could.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Ancient Earth Could Have Been Donut-Shaped ‘Synestia’ Form, Study Suggests

Ancient Earth Could Have Been Donut-Shaped ‘Synestia’ Form, Study Suggests

Ancient Earth Could Have Been Donut-Shaped ‘Synestia’ Form, Study Suggests.
A new study suggests that the Earth may have been donut-shaped or in a “synestia” form 4.5 billion years ago.
The planet could have been a hot, donut-shaped object with vaporized rock as a result of a collision of two planet-sized celestial bodies.
The donut-shaped or synestia form is proposed as a new type of planetary object.
Instead of a debris, their scenario suggested that it will result in a synestia or a weirder donut-sized object.
But the new ancient Earth theory suggested that it took the form of a donut after the impact called synestia.
Based on the paper, the donut-shaped Earth may have only stayed in that phase for about a century.
It then lost enough heat to condense back into its form as a solid circular object.
But, they are hopeful that mankind may be able to see one in the near future in alien solar systems.
The result of the study was published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets.

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LATEST FROMConservation & Sustainability

Conservation & Sustainability

These 10 Shocking Facts On Factory Farms and Water Pollution Will Make You Rethink That Burger

These 10 Shocking Facts On Factory Farms and Water Pollution Will Make You Rethink That Burger

These 10 Shocking Facts On Factory Farms and Water Pollution Will Make You Rethink That Burger.
These animals are subjected to lives in extreme confinement where they live in fear and pain.
The cruelty that these animals experience is rather well-known and understood, however, the negative environmental impact that raising this many animals causes is less so.
Animals raised for food produce approximately 130 times more waste than the entire human population combined.
When you concentrate these animals in massive factory farm facilities, it is incredibly difficult to keep these giant facilities clean without using a massive amount of water.
To run the flushing systems that clean excrement off the floors of dairy farms, 150 gallons of water are required per cow, every single day.
In fact, the majority of water used in factory farms does not go towards hydrating animals, but rather to cleaning and processing animals during slaughter.
Unfortunately, these cesspools are not iron-clad, spill proof facilities, but are prone to leaks.
Between these two factors, there is an extremely high likelihood that factory farm waste will end up in local water supplies.
To get an idea of what sort of damage factory farms are causing to our water supply, check out these shocking facts.

Conservation & Sustainability

The Southwest is burning

The Southwest is burning

The Southwest is burning.
This story was originally published by High Country News and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.
The National Weather Service currently has the region under heat warnings and excessive heat warnings.
Fifty-five fires have burned in Arizona and New Mexico alone.
Yellow pins indicate states where fewer than 10,000 acres are burning.
Click the pin for more details on number of fires, acreage burned, and active fires.
Nationally, wildfires have consumed more than 2.5 million acres of land so far this year.
In the past decade, more acreage burned by this point only once, in 2011.
That year, unusually hot, dry conditions led to several large conflagrations, including New Mexico’s Las Conchas Fire and Arizona’s Wallow Fire.
According to NIFC, suppression alone cost almost $2 billion last year.

Conservation & Sustainability

10 Ways to Save Pollinators and Protect Our Food Supply

10 Ways to Save Pollinators and Protect Our Food Supply

Plant Natives Native plants co-evolved with the native wildlife of your region.
Gives Bees Nesting Places There are 4,000 bee species native to North America (the honey bee is a European import) and most of those don’t form hives.
Avoid Pesticides Bees are our most important pollinators, and they are insects.
So are butterflies like the monarch.
Herbicides will kill important native plants such as milkweed that pollinators rely upon as a food source and a place to raise young.
Adopt a Monarch You can symbolically adopt a monarch butterfly and directly support NWF’s work to save this declining pollinator.
Protect Grasslands America’s native grasslands are critically important for pollinators such as bees and monarch butterflies.
Our grasslands are filled with native plants that offer nectar and pollen for bees, butterflies, hummingbirds and a wide variety of pollinators.
Post a Yard Sign When you create a pollinator garden and certify it with National Wildlife Federation, you become part of the exclusive group of people who can post a Certified Wildlife Habitat sign.
When you certify your yard or garden you can post the exclusive Certified Wildlife Habitat sign to share your accomplishment and help spread the wildlife gardening message.

Conservation & Sustainability

10 Simple Actions That Just Might Save Our World’s Oceans From Plastic

10 Simple Actions That Just Might Save Our World’s Oceans From Plastic

Marine life is currently under attack from all sides by plastic.
Let’s discuss a few simple ways we can drastically cut our contribution of plastic pollution to our oceans and be superheroes to whales and fish everywhere!
If you buy a cup of coffee every weekday, that’s hundreds of plastic lids and stirrers wasted every year!
Maybe you’re eating somewhere you can use a reusable cup, or you can ask for the cup minus the lid and straw.
With the world using an estimated 500 billion plastic bags every single year, the ocean could certainly stand to benefit from us cutting out the stuff and replacing them with reusable shopping bags.
You can avoid contributing to Styrofoam pollution by planning ahead and taking your own reusable containers with you when eating out.
Buy fruits and veggies that don’t come packaged in plastic bags or shrink-wrap.
Plastic packaging for food is actually the largest form of municipal waste in America, resulting in 80 million tons of waste every year!
They do, however, represent some of the most common ways that plastics can be mismanaged and end up in marine ecosystems, and thus some of the more effective ways we can begin to address marine plastic pollution.
Why not start making choices today that save our oceans from plastic waste?

Conservation & Sustainability

Everything From Road Salt to Lawn Fertilizer is Killing Our Lakes and Marine Life – Here’s What You Can Do

Everything From Road Salt to Lawn Fertilizer is Killing Our Lakes and Marine Life – Here’s What You Can Do

Everything From Road Salt to Lawn Fertilizer is Killing Our Lakes and Marine Life – Here’s What You Can Do.
Pollution from plastic and other solid waste is part of the problem, but chemicals from household products, fertilizer, and even road salt are also contaminating our lakes, causing high levels of bacteria and nutrients, depleting oxygen levels, and posing a threat to aquatic species, wildlife and even humans.
Fertilizer, Pesticides and Other Chemical Waste Around 75 million pounds of pesticides and 22 million tons of fertilizer are being used in the U.S. annually.
When nitrogen and phosphorous from fertilizer enters lakes, it stimulates the growth of algae and aquatic plants, which can eventually suffocate lakes and result in “dead zones” where aquatic life is unable to thrive due to a lack of oxygen in the water.
Only about 50 percent of fertilizers are actually taken up by the crops themselves.
Between 70 and 80 million pounds of pesticides are sprayed on home lawns, trees, and shrubs per year in the United States.
Even if you don’t use these chemicals on your lawn, the run-off from neighboring lawns can also pose a threat.
Cleaning supplies, personal care products, and prescription medications, which are unable to be filtered by water treatment plants, also have a harmful impact on lakes.
Usually, these chemicals are diluted and spread throughout a body of water, so marine animals aren’t typically exposed to high levels of chemicals – but the catch is, many will bioaccumulate in animals’ tissues.
Making your own toothpaste, hand soap and other personal care products from natural sources helps protect our environment as well as your health by limiting exposure to chemicals.

Conservation & Sustainability

The Trash Incinerator Industry Is Trying To Tank A Massive Renewable-Energy Effort

The Trash Incinerator Industry Is Trying To Tank A Massive Renewable-Energy Effort

Advocates for the trash-incineration industry are trying to sink an effort to get nearly 1,500 cities behind 100 percent renewable energy, according to an email obtained by HuffPost.
On Friday, the Energy Recovery Council ― a trade group representing companies that operate most of the country’s 77 power plants that burn solid waste ― asked its members to send letters to the committee’s 13 members and urge them to block the motion because it doesn’t include burning garbage as a source of renewable energy.
The email, sent by association President Ted Michaels to the roughly two dozen cities with trash-incineration plants, included a prewritten letter.
“ERC is sending a letter to the USCM Energy Committee expressing opposition to the proposed resolution,” Michaels wrote in the email.
“It would be extremely helpful if ERC Municipal Members would also communicate opposition to the proposed policy by emailing the Energy Committee.
The Morning Email Wake up to the day’s most important news.
Electricity from trash incineration makes up only a tiny fraction of the U.S. output.
In 2015, waste-to-energy plants produced roughly 14 billion kilowatt-hours burning about 29 million tons of garbage, according to data from the Energy Information Association.
At the same time, incinerators do help reduce the waste pileup.
Still, incinerators are by far the most expensive source of electricity, with a projected capital cost of $8,232 per kilowatt-hour for new waste incinerator facilities, according to the EIA’s 2010 annual energy outlook report.

LATEST FROMClimate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change & Global Warming

We should be glad the US is out of the Paris Climate Agreement

We should be glad the US is out of the Paris Climate Agreement

We should be glad the US is out of the Paris Climate Agreement.
Its members insist that they remain committed to Paris and are determined to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and prevent climate change.
Paul Driessen and David R. Legates Ten states, some 150 cities, and 1,100 businesses, universities and organizations insist “We are still in” – committed to the Paris climate agreement and determined to continue reducing carbon dioxide emissions and preventing climate change.
When Delaware signed on to WASI, for example, Governor Carney cited rising average temperatures, rising sea levels, and an increase in extreme weather events.
Surely, WASI members and the rest of the world have better uses for that money than chasing climate chimeras.
But in 150+ countries that are under no obligation under Paris to reduce their fossil fuel use, emissions will increase.
Expensive energy will hurt poor and minority families the most and send jobs to countries where energy costs less.
The United States reduced CO2 emissions by 12% between 2005 and 2015.
Governors who have committed their states to this climate-centered resistance movement have done so without approval from the legislature or their constituents.
With tax increase and soaring energy costs?

Climate Change & Global Warming

End of coal: Failure to see it coming will hurt miners most

End of coal: Failure to see it coming will hurt miners most

Workers must prepare for and move to new jobs, regional economic policy has to be redrawn and companies need to develop new business models.
For instance, from 1965 to 1990 the Limburg region of the Netherlands – a former coal mining heartland that employed more than 75,000 miners – was able to transition from coal mining to a relatively successful regional economic hub with new industrial activities, with most workers finding reemployment or retiring normally.
Almost everywhere, with the notable exception of Limburg, the failure to prepare and invest in economic alternatives for former mining regions has meant that regional unemployment in mining regions is often significantly higher than the national average.
In the UK, thirty years after the Thatcher government suddenly withdrew support for the industry, many mining regions still only count 50 jobs per hundred working age adults.
The social and economic costs of failing to adequately prepare and implement the transition while time and resources are available can therefore be very high.
These often resulted in poor long term outcomes for workers’ long term employability and health and for those of their children.
But the costs of failing to invest in the transition early enough are clearly much higher.
That’s before any investment in a transition away from coal.
Failure to invest sufficient resources and political will into a transition can lead to the development of extremely costly economic, social and environmental problems.
However, early anticipation, building consensus among key stakeholders early and investing in the future of workers and regions are vital ingredients of a just transition.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Ancient Earth Could Have Been Donut-Shaped ‘Synestia’ Form, Study Suggests

Ancient Earth Could Have Been Donut-Shaped ‘Synestia’ Form, Study Suggests

Ancient Earth Could Have Been Donut-Shaped ‘Synestia’ Form, Study Suggests.
A new study suggests that the Earth may have been donut-shaped or in a “synestia” form 4.5 billion years ago.
The planet could have been a hot, donut-shaped object with vaporized rock as a result of a collision of two planet-sized celestial bodies.
The donut-shaped or synestia form is proposed as a new type of planetary object.
Instead of a debris, their scenario suggested that it will result in a synestia or a weirder donut-sized object.
But the new ancient Earth theory suggested that it took the form of a donut after the impact called synestia.
Based on the paper, the donut-shaped Earth may have only stayed in that phase for about a century.
It then lost enough heat to condense back into its form as a solid circular object.
But, they are hopeful that mankind may be able to see one in the near future in alien solar systems.
The result of the study was published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets.

Climate Change & Global Warming

The North Atlantic Seesaw

The North Atlantic Seesaw

Now, people often discuss procedures like “removing the effects of the El Nino from the global temperature record”.
This is to note that although there are areas of the surface which show a good positive correlation to global temperatures, there are also areas that show a good negative correlation to global temperatures.
It displays how well the temperatures in each gridcell agree or disagree with the global average temperature variations shown in Figure 1.
Setting those questions aside, the overall pattern in the Pacific is clearly related to the heat which is moved by the El Nino / La Nina pump.
The results of this pumping action can be seen in Figure 2 as the green areas in the western Pacific heading towards the north and south polar regions.
Note that both the Western Pacific and the North Atlantic move in opposition to the NINO3.4 area.
When enough heat has accumulated in the eastern Pacific, the El Nino / La Nina pump pushes warm water first westward, then poleward.
Note that the North Atlantic is included among the areas with a strong negative correlation to the NINO3.4 area.
Trump was 100% right (not just 97%) to show real leadership and walk away from Paris President Trump has rejected and exited the Paris climate treaty – walked America away from the Mad Hatter tea party that was the entire multi-decade, often hysterical and always computer model-driven UN climate process.
Our resident cartoonist, Josh, noticed and replied: inspiring, now all bad weather can be blamed on @realDonaldTrump pic.twitter.com/ZlKZj56mUS — Josh (@Cartoonsbyjosh) June 2, 2017 Hi, Justthefacts…… ….. for the Earth’s orbit section and all astronomical background…..some time is needed to understand the real Earth’s trajectory….. Any questions to me always welcome…… Following background: There is good data and analysis done at NASA JPL Pasadena… I can quote literature….. but the IPCC/AGW “hijacked” the orbit topic by not using American data….and the IPCC orbit analysis went to Belgium, to the University of Louvain, a center of entrenched AGW-proponents….

Climate Change & Global Warming

One Response to “What to Bring to Summer Camp”

One Response to “What to Bring to Summer Camp”

Over the years we’ve created an ongoing list of personal care products that my kids like AND use at camp.
It comes in a flexible container which makes it easier to pack for summer camp.
They also have a hand sanitizer made with organic ingredients that we’ll be sending along.
Seeing the MADE SAFE certification on the bug repellent was reassuring.
They certify that products are made with safe ingredients not known or suspected to harm human health.
Even at summer camp.
Everything that goes to camp has to be labeled or it won’t make it home (sometimes it still doesn’t make it home!).
I’ve been using Mabel’s Labels for labeling clothing for many years.
Do you have any summer camp favorites to add to the list?
Here are a few summer camp favorites from years past:

Climate Change & Global Warming

Biking to Work Could Reduce Stress Levels, Improve Work Performance

Biking to Work Could Reduce Stress Levels, Improve Work Performance

Biking to Work Could Reduce Stress Levels, Improve Work Performance.
Their discovery, published in the International Journal of Workplace Health Environment, showed that people who rode their bike on the way to work experience significantly lower level of stress, than those who travelled by car or public transports. “Our study was an attempt to address that gap.”
The participants were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding their mood, perceived commuting stress and mode of travel.
The researchers only accepted the response of the participants who completed the questionnaires within 45 minutes of arriving at work.
They did this in order to get more of an “in-moment” assessment of the stress and mood of the employees.
Lower level of stress in the morning could indicate better work performance throughout the day. “They can shape how subsequent events are perceived, interpreted and acted upon for the rest of the day.”
Riding the bike to work will not only make you physically fit, but can also help in reducing carbon dioxide emissions.
With the result of the study, the researchers hope that more people will be encourage to ride their bike, instead of taking public commute or driving a car.

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