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Alternative Energy

Seismic Blasting Approved in the Great Australian Bight, Posing ‘Lethal Threat’ to Marine Life

Seismic Blasting Approved in the Great Australian Bight, Posing ‘Lethal Threat’ to Marine Life

Bob Adams / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0 Australia’s petroleum regulator granted permission for seismic blasting in the Great Australian Bight, sparking fierce outcry from environmentalists over its threat to the area’s marine life, whihc include endangered blue and southern right whales.
During the survey process, loud, continuous and far-reaching soundwaves are blasted onto the bottom in search of oil or gas reserves. “Seismic blasting has a devastating impact on marine life.
It has been likened to being next to an exploding grenade and these deafening blasts will detonate every ten seconds, 24 hours a day, for more than 90 days,” Greenpeace Australia Pacific senior campaigner Nathaniel Pelle said in an online statement.
Breaking!
Govt agency NOPSEMA has given the green light to big oil & gas to conduct seismic testing just 90km off K… https://t.co/emnnZStvwB — Sarah Hanson-Young💚 (@sarahinthesen8) 1547498651.0 PGS’ plan includes measures aimed at protecting pygmy blue whales, southern right whales and southern bluefin tuna, but Southern Bluefin Tuna Industry Association spokesman Brian Jeffriess wondered if these safeguards would effectively prevent a full survey from taking place.
He added no wells have been drilled in the Great Australian Bight in the last 15 years. “Our energy mix is changing, the role of renewable energy is increasing … our industry is very much a supporter of that,” he said. “But we will use a lot of oil and a lot of gas for decades to come.” “Seismic testing is the first step toward economically devastating oil spills and climate disasters like flooding u… https://t.co/3yzgFlYsvK — EcoWatch (@EcoWatch) 1543597813.0

Wellness

These 4 Money Personalities Dictate Our Spending Habits. Which One Are You?

These 4 Money Personalities Dictate Our Spending Habits. Which One Are You?

According to the financial psychologist, identifying your money script is the first step in questioning, and ultimately transforming, the habits that are holding you back in the financial department.
In order to really explore your financial life, you need to think about more than just how you’re spending your paycheck.
They have negative beliefs around wealthy people and think that money usually leads to corruption.
People with this script might tell people they make more than they do, only buy things that are new and flashy, etc.
Unsurprisingly, money vigilance is considered the most desirable script in the long run, and Klontz says most of the wealthy people he’s worked with fall into the vigilant camp. “Ask how these beliefs are playing out in your life.
Putting it into context is hugely powerful,” Klontz says.
If you grew up with a lot of money but had a parent who was constantly working, you might practice more money avoidance. “If you’re looking to make more money, try to find someone in your life right now who is a step or two ahead of where you are.
How do they think about money?

Energy

Ascent Resources Shifts Focus From Petišovci Fracking Project

Ascent Resources Shifts Focus From Petišovci Fracking Project

Ascent Resources, the UK-based firm engaged in a long-running attempt to begin fracking at Petišovci, a plan that has been delayed due to a lack of permits, said on Monday that it’s now looking to develop other projects outside Slovenia.
A report published on the London South East website, sets out how the company is still waiting on permits to re-stimulate it’s existing wells to produce more gas from the field, and install a processing facility to enable the natural gas it produces to enter the Slovenian national grid.
The story became more heated in late 2018, with accusations that Ascent Resources shareholders, or other interested parties, had been sending threatening messages to the Slovenian Environment Agency, as reported here, as well as threats by the company to sue the Slovene government for damages.
While Ascent Resources claims to be hopeful that that it will receive the permits needed to continue the Petišovci project, it is now looking beyond Slovenia and to other locations in the region with a more developed oil and gas infrastructure, working petroleum system and an established regulatory and legal framework.
The firm’s Chief Executive, Colin Hutchinson, is quoted as saying “While the Petišovci project remains a potentially very valuable asset, I am pleased that we now have a way forward that is not entirely based on Slovenia and the award of permits.” At the time of writing the shares of Ascent Resources (AST) were trading at £0.32 in London, down from £1.40 a year ago.

Wellness

Well+Good TALKS: ReNew Year Edition

Well+Good TALKS: ReNew Year Edition

Ali Finney | Well+Good Senior Editor, Beauty + Fitness With deep experience covering the beauty and fitness beats for Well+Good, Ali’s writing has also appeared in ELLE, Women’s Health, and Texas Monthly.
An avid runner, she just ran the New York City Marathon in 2018.
Daphne Javitch | Holistic Nutritionist + Founder of Doing Well Overcoming lifelong symptoms of Stage 4 Endometriosis through diet and lifestyle inspired Daphne to get certified as a Health Educator and become a holistic nutritionist.
In addition to her work with corporate, private, and high-profile clients, Daphne appears on panels and podcasts, and her insights have been shared widely in women’s lifestyle media.
Doing Well is her vision of health: simple, straightforward, and real-life friendly.
Bee Shapiro | New York Times Beauty Columnist + Author of Skin Deep Bee Shapiro is the longtime New York Times beauty columnist and author of Skin Deep: Women on Skin Care, Makeup, and Looking Their Best, a compilation of her best-read columns.
Bee is also the founder of Ellis Brooklyn, a clean luxury fragrance brand currently carried at Sephora, Credo, Revolve and more.
Elisa Shankle | Interior Designer + Co-founder of HealHaus Elisa was inspired to share the healing powers of wellness with others after learning how to use diet and herbs to overcome her anxiety and depression in her 20s.
She wove her love for design (she holds an interior design degree from Pratt Institute) together with her passion for holistic healing to create HealHaus, a cafe and wellness sanctuary in Brooklyn where the community is encouraged to explore personal healing through lifestyle shifts rather than passing fads.
Well+Good TALKS is your front-row seat to the industry insiders, brainy entrepreneurs, and healthy celebs at the forefront of wellness with monthly chats on the buzzy topics that are shaking up the scene right now.

Organic Living

5 Gadgets from Eco-Friendly Companies You Need to Check Out Now

5 Gadgets from Eco-Friendly Companies You Need to Check Out Now

So many companies are more concerned about cranking up production than they are protecting the environment.
A select few companies are committed to both protecting the environment and providing some amazing gadgetry that you can enjoy.
With the iPhone X, you can get one the best smartphones on the market, and give your money to a company that cares as much as you do about the planet.
Fire TV Stick 4K with Alexa Voice Remote (Amazon) You might not automatically associate Amazon with environmental conservation, but trust me: they’re one of the good guys.
Other features that creative types will love include: 13.5 hours of battery life Up to 16 GB RAM Up to 1 TB of storage The compact and light-weight design 5.
Retro RP-HTX80B Headphones (Panasonic) For great audio quality that doesn’t wreck the environment, these awesome headphones from Panasonic can’t be beaten.
Panasonic first announced its Environment Vision 2050 back in 2017.
According to the company site, Panasonic has committed to improving its energy-efficient processes and creating more energy than it spends.
Supported by dual 40mm neodymium drivers, the headphones produce some of the most dynamic audio quality you can get.
Even with constant use, the built-in battery will keep you cranking out jams for up to 24 hours at full charge.

Conservation & Sustainability

Watching too much hurricane coverage is bad for your mental health

Watching too much hurricane coverage is bad for your mental health

no news is good news When it comes to surviving climate disasters, it’s not necessarily over when the weather gets better.
Like people who lived through Hurricanes Katrina, Maria, Sandy, and other disasters — those recovering from Hurricane Irma are reporting symptoms of post traumatic stress.
Researchers from the University of California, Irvine, surveyed roughly 1,500 Floridians before Hurricane Irma made landfall and again one month after the storm.
Participants were also asked to report how many hours of coverage they consumed during and immediately after the storm via television, radio, print, online news, and social media.
Results showed that participants who were heavier consumers of media during the storm and had a more a negative outlook on how they would be affected by Irma, experienced worse mental health outcomes afterwards.
Even after controlling for some people’s natural tendencies toward anxiety, “We still see this robust relationship between media consumption and poorer psychological outcomes,” says Rebecca Thompson, a postdoctoral scholar at UC Irvine and the lead author of the report.
The authors note that seeking information to understand a potentially dangerous situation is a natural response for someone who feels threatened.
But according to the study, the way the story was covered was not necessarily productive as “Media provided 24-hour sensationalized coverage, which described the possibility of “a catastrophic hit” and “worse than feared” destruction.” Researchers hypothesized that this type of coverage might have heightened residents’ trepidations as they searched for information to prepare themselves.
And repeatedly showing footage of destruction can also be upsetting, Thompson explains.
The report recommends that media and authorities communicate, “a hazard-specific appropriate level of risk.” Understanding the psychological patterns of weather disasters is all the more important in an increasingly warming world, the study notes: “As climate scientists predict more active Atlantic hurricane seasons, it is especially important that we consider ways to mitigate the psychological risks that accompany the increasing frequency and intensity of hurricanes in coastal communities.”

Conservation & Sustainability

PG&E’s bankruptcy will slow California’s climate efforts

PG&E’s bankruptcy will slow California’s climate efforts

What happens when a state’s major partner in its green makeover suddenly goes bankrupt?
Without PG&E, the state’s energy efficiency programs, renewable power investments, and rooftop solar initiatives are all at risk, according to Ralph Cavanagh, co-director of Natural Resources Defense Council’s energy program.
In a blog post, he pointed out that the company is investing over $1 billion a year in clean energy infrastructure and warned against reflexively punishing the company.
The recent run of wildfires are part of the story.
Electrical wires owned by the utility are a primary suspect in several wildfires that killed more than 90 people and destroyed some 20,000 homes over the past two years.
“It’s hard to believe that anybody would have predicted that it would have been like this,” Stephen Tankersley, who oversaw PG&E’s vegetation-management program between 1999 and 2015, told the Journal.
Cavanaugh and other NRDC lawyers went to court back then to protect the utility’s clean energy investments.
Cavanagh thinks California needs to change things if it wants to meet its climate goals.
The state should reform its liability rules, he said, while also doubling down on efforts to stem climate change.
“The clean energy transition well underway remains our best long-term defense,” Cavanagh told Grist.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Fall Leaf sales fall: Nissan Leaf sales collapse in Ontario after incentive axed

Fall Leaf sales fall: Nissan Leaf sales collapse in Ontario after incentive axed

Since the Ford government in Ontario in July ended rebates of up to $14,000 and the final recipients were registered Sept. 10, sales of the Nissan Leaf have all but collapsed.
Sales of electrified vehicles have plummeted in Ontario since the Doug Ford government removed purchase incentives, and Quebec dealers are reaping the benefits as inventory is reallocated, slashing their wait times for delivery.
Since the Ford government in July ended rebates of up to $14,000 and the final recipients were registered Sept. 10, sales of the Nissan Leaf have all but collapsed.
In Quebec in November alone, 283 units were sold.
General Motors of Canada declined to provide data, but spokeswoman Ester Bucci said the brand has “seen a decline of EV sales” since the rebate’s cancellation, noting that sales in Quebec and British Columbia, where incentives remain in place, are holding strong with Chevrolet Bolt sales posting an overall nationwide increase of 30 per cent year over year.
Chris Budd, owner of Budds’ Group of Companies, which operates nine dealerships in Oakville and Hamilton, Ont., told Automotive News Canada he has seen a decline in interest in EVs at his storefronts.
“Our GM facility sold and delivered 91 electric cars last year when the credit was in place.
“We are receiving an incremental amount of hybrid vehicles in Quebec,” said Denis Leclerc, president of the Albi group of dealerships.
Last year, it took six months to receive a Bolt, and now it takes eight to 10 weeks.
We also have Volt in our inventory, and last year this wasn’t the case.” Read the full story here.

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Conservation & Sustainability

Watching too much hurricane coverage is bad for your mental health

Watching too much hurricane coverage is bad for your mental health

no news is good news When it comes to surviving climate disasters, it’s not necessarily over when the weather gets better.
Like people who lived through Hurricanes Katrina, Maria, Sandy, and other disasters — those recovering from Hurricane Irma are reporting symptoms of post traumatic stress.
Researchers from the University of California, Irvine, surveyed roughly 1,500 Floridians before Hurricane Irma made landfall and again one month after the storm.
Participants were also asked to report how many hours of coverage they consumed during and immediately after the storm via television, radio, print, online news, and social media.
Results showed that participants who were heavier consumers of media during the storm and had a more a negative outlook on how they would be affected by Irma, experienced worse mental health outcomes afterwards.
Even after controlling for some people’s natural tendencies toward anxiety, “We still see this robust relationship between media consumption and poorer psychological outcomes,” says Rebecca Thompson, a postdoctoral scholar at UC Irvine and the lead author of the report.
The authors note that seeking information to understand a potentially dangerous situation is a natural response for someone who feels threatened.
But according to the study, the way the story was covered was not necessarily productive as “Media provided 24-hour sensationalized coverage, which described the possibility of “a catastrophic hit” and “worse than feared” destruction.” Researchers hypothesized that this type of coverage might have heightened residents’ trepidations as they searched for information to prepare themselves.
And repeatedly showing footage of destruction can also be upsetting, Thompson explains.
The report recommends that media and authorities communicate, “a hazard-specific appropriate level of risk.” Understanding the psychological patterns of weather disasters is all the more important in an increasingly warming world, the study notes: “As climate scientists predict more active Atlantic hurricane seasons, it is especially important that we consider ways to mitigate the psychological risks that accompany the increasing frequency and intensity of hurricanes in coastal communities.”

Conservation & Sustainability

PG&E’s bankruptcy will slow California’s climate efforts

PG&E’s bankruptcy will slow California’s climate efforts

What happens when a state’s major partner in its green makeover suddenly goes bankrupt?
Without PG&E, the state’s energy efficiency programs, renewable power investments, and rooftop solar initiatives are all at risk, according to Ralph Cavanagh, co-director of Natural Resources Defense Council’s energy program.
In a blog post, he pointed out that the company is investing over $1 billion a year in clean energy infrastructure and warned against reflexively punishing the company.
The recent run of wildfires are part of the story.
Electrical wires owned by the utility are a primary suspect in several wildfires that killed more than 90 people and destroyed some 20,000 homes over the past two years.
“It’s hard to believe that anybody would have predicted that it would have been like this,” Stephen Tankersley, who oversaw PG&E’s vegetation-management program between 1999 and 2015, told the Journal.
Cavanaugh and other NRDC lawyers went to court back then to protect the utility’s clean energy investments.
Cavanagh thinks California needs to change things if it wants to meet its climate goals.
The state should reform its liability rules, he said, while also doubling down on efforts to stem climate change.
“The clean energy transition well underway remains our best long-term defense,” Cavanagh told Grist.

Conservation & Sustainability

Ryan Zinke Prioritized Fixing National Parks. He Exited With Them In Shambles.

Ryan Zinke Prioritized Fixing National Parks. He Exited With Them In Shambles.

On his second day as interior secretary, Ryan Zinke told his staff that America’s national parks were “the face” of the Interior Department.
Less than two years later — on Jan. 2, the 12th day of President Donald Trump’s ongoing partial government shutdown — Zinke exited the department under a cloud of ethics scandals, and Americans instead saw national parks and monuments around the country overflowing with trash and human waste.
“There’s an old adage that park rangers get paid in sunsets,” he said.
There’s an old adage that park rangers get paid in sunsets.
Meanwhile, Bernhardt’s memorandum allowing parks to drain entrance fee monies ― every last cent, if necessary, as The Hill reported ― means the primary resource for addressing the maintenance backlog is being depleted, Jarvis said.
And when the shutdown finally ends, the parks will have to spend additional funds cleaning up and assessing the damage.
“It’s kind of a triple whammy,” Jarvis said.
The Trump administration’s decision to keep parks and monuments open goes back to the brief partial government shutdown in early 2018.
The Interior Department and the National Park Service did not respond to HuffPost’s requests for comment Friday.
“This is mortgaging the park service’s future,” he said of the administration’s approach, including its decision to drain entrance fee revenue.

Conservation & Sustainability

Ocean temps rising faster than scientists thought: Report

Ocean temps rising faster than scientists thought: Report

This story was originally published by the HuffPost and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.
Ocean temperatures are rising faster than scientists previously concluded, according to an alarming report released Thursday.
The research, published in the journal Science, said that scientists found several inaccuracies with the way ocean temperatures were previously measured and that warming levels for the past few decades were actually greater than what scientists found in 2013.
The report also found that the warming rate has accelerated since 1991.
Emissions in the United States jumped 3.4 percent last year from 2017 — the second-largest annual increase in more than two decades, according to a preliminary estimate by the economic research company Rhodium Group.
The Science report linked the warming to more rain, increased sea levels, coral reef destruction, declining ocean oxygen levels, and declines in ice sheets, glaciers, and ice caps in polar environments.
“The fairly steady rise in OHC [ocean heat content] shows that the planet is clearly warming,” the report stated, adding that rising sea levels and temperatures should be concerning, “given the abundant evidence of effects on storms, hurricanes, and the hydrological cycle, including extreme precipitation events.” The report calculates two scenarios depicting significant warming this century.
The first scenario falls in line with the Paris Climate Agreement’s goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to keep the average global temperature from rising no more than 2 degrees C (3.6 degrees F) above preindustrial levels.
The U.S. joined the deal last month despite President Donald Trump’s 2017 pledge to withdraw the country from the Paris accord.
The U.S. may not withdraw from the agreement until 2020.

Conservation & Sustainability

Off-roading, chopped Joshua Trees, overflowing toilets: Our national parks during a shutdown

Off-roading, chopped Joshua Trees, overflowing toilets: Our national parks during a shutdown

But during the government shutdown, some fine folks did just that.
Since the government shut down 20 days ago, Joshua Tree, which is about the size of Delaware and located two hours east of Los Angeles, has been forced to reduce its number of rangers from 100 to only eight.
During the shutdown, with Joshua Tree National Park open but no staff on duty, visitors cut down Joshua trees so they could drive into sensitive areas where vehicles are banned.
https://t.co/EbSB4bF8hK pic.twitter.com/8kVFClVqxZ — John Upton (@johnupton) January 10, 2019 And it isn’t just Joshua Tree bearing the brute force of the barbaric human.
“I think there are a number of things that are not very obvious to the general public, like the trash and toilets [are], that are pretty consequential when you have a shutdown,” National Park Service Director Jon Jarvis told the the National Parks Traveler.
While the sight of overflowing waste and cut Joshua trees is shocking (and quite frankly repulsive), there is also major damage happening out-of-sight.
The longest-running research initiative in the Shenandoah National park — 200,000 acres in the mountains of Virginia — has come to a grinding halt during the government shutdown.
The study examines the impact of acid rain in the mid-Atlantic forests, and the research has been used to understand the effects of air pollution on natural systems.
No big deal, unless you like breathing clean air.
Earlier this month, Acting Interior Secretary David Bernhardt instructed all national parks to use fee revenues in order to keep parks open during the shut down.

Conservation & Sustainability

Ocean Temps Rising Faster Than Scientists Thought: Report

Ocean Temps Rising Faster Than Scientists Thought: Report

Ocean temperatures are rising faster than scientists previously concluded, according to an alarming report released Thursday.
The research, published in the journal Science, said that scientists found several inaccuracies with the way ocean temperatures were previously measured and that warming levels for the past few decades were actually greater than what scientists found in 2013.
“Recent observation-based estimates show rapid warming of Earth’s oceans,” read the report, which used four independent studies to track ocean heat content from 1971 to 2010.
Emissions in the United States jumped 3.4 percent last year from 2017 — the second-largest annual increase in more than two decades, according to a preliminary estimate by the economic research company Rhodium Group.
The Science report linked the warming to more rain, increased sea levels, coral reef destruction, declining ocean oxygen levels and declines in ice sheets, glaciers and ice caps in polar environments.
“The fairly steady rise in OHC [ocean heat content] shows that the planet is clearly warming,” the report stated, adding that rising sea levels and temperatures should be concerning, “given the abundant evidence of effects on storms, hurricanes and the hydrological cycle, including extreme precipitation events.” The report calculates two scenarios depicting significant warming this century.
The first scenario falls in line with the Paris Climate Agreement’s goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to keep the average global temperature from rising no more than 2 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels.
The second scenario assumes no change in emissions and projects warming that could severely affect ocean ecosystems and sea levels.
The U.S. joined the deal last month despite President Donald Trump’s 2017 pledge to withdraw the country from the Paris accord.
The U.S. may not withdraw from the agreement until 2020.

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Climate Change & Global Warming

Fall Leaf sales fall: Nissan Leaf sales collapse in Ontario after incentive axed

Fall Leaf sales fall: Nissan Leaf sales collapse in Ontario after incentive axed

Since the Ford government in Ontario in July ended rebates of up to $14,000 and the final recipients were registered Sept. 10, sales of the Nissan Leaf have all but collapsed.
Sales of electrified vehicles have plummeted in Ontario since the Doug Ford government removed purchase incentives, and Quebec dealers are reaping the benefits as inventory is reallocated, slashing their wait times for delivery.
Since the Ford government in July ended rebates of up to $14,000 and the final recipients were registered Sept. 10, sales of the Nissan Leaf have all but collapsed.
In Quebec in November alone, 283 units were sold.
General Motors of Canada declined to provide data, but spokeswoman Ester Bucci said the brand has “seen a decline of EV sales” since the rebate’s cancellation, noting that sales in Quebec and British Columbia, where incentives remain in place, are holding strong with Chevrolet Bolt sales posting an overall nationwide increase of 30 per cent year over year.
Chris Budd, owner of Budds’ Group of Companies, which operates nine dealerships in Oakville and Hamilton, Ont., told Automotive News Canada he has seen a decline in interest in EVs at his storefronts.
“Our GM facility sold and delivered 91 electric cars last year when the credit was in place.
“We are receiving an incremental amount of hybrid vehicles in Quebec,” said Denis Leclerc, president of the Albi group of dealerships.
Last year, it took six months to receive a Bolt, and now it takes eight to 10 weeks.
We also have Volt in our inventory, and last year this wasn’t the case.” Read the full story here.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Insect collapse: ‘We are destroying our life support systems’

Insect collapse: ‘We are destroying our life support systems’

“We were driving into the forest and at the same time both Andres and I said: ‘Where are all the birds?’ There was nothing.” His return to the Luquillo rainforest in Puerto Rico after 35 years was to reveal an appalling discovery.
The most likely culprit by far is global warming.
“Before, both the sticky ground plates and canopy plates would be covered with insects.
But now the plates would come down after 12 hours in the tropical forest with a couple of lonely insects trapped or none at all.” “It was a true collapse of the insect populations in that rainforest,” he said.
When Lister’s study was published in October, one expert called the findings “hyper-alarming”.
“It is just horrifying to watch us decimate the natural world like this.” It was not insects that drew Lister to the Luquillo rainforest for the first time in the mid-1970s.
It’s a phantasmagoric landscape.” It was important to measure insect numbers, as these are the lizards’ main food, but at the time he thought nothing more of it.
“One of the things I noticed in the forest was a lack of butterflies,” he said.
As the data came in, the predictions were confirmed in startling fashion.
Data on other animals that feed on bugs backed up the findings.

Climate Change & Global Warming

There is snow cover trend due to global warming since 1972 in the Northern Hemisphere

There is snow cover trend due to global warming since 1972 in the Northern Hemisphere

From the “alarmists and their cats are grumpy over this” department.
There’s been some recent hubbub over decreasing snowfall in the northern hemisphere by the usual suspects, who claim that AGW is reducing snow cover.
And then of course, there’s Dr. David Viner of CRU, who famously said in a story in the UK Independent titled: Snowfalls are now just a thing of the past: However, the warming is so far manifesting itself more in winters which are less cold than in much hotter summers.
According to Dr David Viner, a senior research scientist at the climatic research unit (CRU) of the University of East Anglia,within a few years winter snowfall will become “a very rare and exciting event”.
“Children just aren’t going to know what snow is,” he said.
It got disappeared from the Internet, but I saved a copy here: One of the longest running climate prediction blunders has disappeared from the Internet That’s opinion, then there’s data, such as this data from the highly respected Rutgers Snow Lab, as platted by climate scientists Ole Humlum.
No trend, period.
Don’t believe it?
Plot it yourself: use this link to download the original data.
More here: http://www.climate4you.com/SnowCover.htm From The Daily Caller 12:01 PM 12/31/2018 | Energy Michael Bastasch | Energy Editor 2018 saw a global revolt against policies aimed at fighting global warming Australia, Canada, France and the U.S. have all seen push back against global warming policies That included weeks of riots in France against planned carbon tax increases Despite increasingly…

Climate Change & Global Warming

A Small Margin Of Error

A Small Margin Of Error

Here’s Zeke’s claim: Figure 1.
That would mean that we would have an error of ten times that, ± 0.03°C if there were only 38 ARGO floats … Sorry.
Thirty-eight thermometers, each taking three vertical temperature profiles per month, to measure the temperature of the top two kilometers of the entire global ocean to plus or minus three hundredths of a degree?
Now, there are 33,713 1°x1° gridcells with ocean data.
So the Argo floats are sampling on the order of ten percent of the gridcells … meaning that despite having lots of Argo floats, still at any given time, 90% of the 1°x1° ocean gridcells are not sampled.
Figure 4 shows the results of a typical run.
Typical run, average global ocean temperature 0-2,000 metres depth, from Levitus World Ocean Atlas (red dots) and from 3.825 simulated Argo locations.
Monthly averages are within a tenth of a degree of the actual average … but because the Argo floats only measure about 10% of the 1°x1° ocean gridcells, that is still more than an order of magnitude larger than the claimed 2018 95% confidence interval for the AIP data shown in Figure 1.
z1955error = 95 # 1955 error in ZJ print(paste(round(z1955error/zjoulesperdeg,2),”°C 1955 error”)) [1] “0.04 °C 1955 error”
z2018error = 9 # 1955 error in ZJ print(paste(round(z2018error/zjoulesperdeg,3),”°C 2018 error”)) [1] “0.003 °C 2018 error”

Climate Change & Global Warming

China says no to solar and wind technology unless it can compete with coal prices

China says no to solar and wind technology unless it can compete with coal prices

China has said it will not approve wind and solar power projects unless they can compete with coal power prices.
Beijing pulled the plug on support for large solar projects, which had been receiving a per kWh payment, in late May.
That news came immediately after the country’s largest solar industry event and caught everyone by surprise.
Officials are understood to have been frustrated at seeing Chinese suppliers and engineering firms building solar projects overseas that delivered electricity at prices far below what was available back home.
The country also has its own issues with grid logjams.
In 2017 12% of wind generation and 6% of solar was curtailed.
Technical specifications will ensure that the highest standards are met on that front.
In the past, provincial authorities have spent heavily to bankroll uncompetitive solar manufacturers.
Thursday’s announcement warned that any attempt to use project subsidies to invest in “local factories” or to make the use of locally made components a condition of the subsidy.
Full story here h/t to The GWPF From The Daily Caller 12:01 PM 12/31/2018 | Energy Michael Bastasch | Energy Editor 2018 saw a global revolt against policies aimed at fighting global warming Australia, Canada, France and the U.S. have all seen push back against global warming policies That included weeks of riots in France against planned carbon tax increases Despite increasingly…

Climate Change & Global Warming

Climate Weekly: What to watch in 2019

Climate Weekly: What to watch in 2019

Sign up to get our weekly newsletter straight to your inbox, plus breaking news, investigations and extra bulletins from key events Hello and welcome to 2019, a year that will put the resilience of the Paris Agreement to the test.
We have a rulebook for the pact, but are leaders ready to inject more ambition?
Natalie Sauer examined the prospects for increased national action.
Chile, the host of this year’s UN climate summit, is burning and the government has warned hot, dry weather could worsen wildfires.
Jim Kim is leaving the World Bank for the private sector, in a move that came earlier than most people expected.
Will the US administration name a successor who takes green finance seriously?
And seven EU member states are late with their climate and energy homework, reports Euractiv.
Down to the last hours of Katowice, it was Brazil vs the world.
Brazil has a more hardline government and negotiators have less flexibility to trade off compromises here against other aspects of talks.
Speaking of Brazil and its government, what will come of all the threats and bluster the Bolsonaro administration made before it took power?

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