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Conservation & Sustainability

Trump’s NASA Chief Has Apparently Changed His Tune On Climate Change

Trump’s NASA Chief Has Apparently Changed His Tune On Climate Change

Jim Bridenstine, Donald Trump’s pick as NASA administrator, appeared to change his tune on climate change during his first employee town hall since he was confirmed to the position, acknowledging that human beings contribute significantly to the warming of the planet.
“I don’t deny that consensus that the climate is changing.
In fact, I fully believe and know that the climate is changing.
“It’s going to depend on a whole lot of factors, and we’re still learning more about that every day,” he said last November.
He was narrowly confirmed by the Senate 50-49, and politicians on both sides of the aisle shared their concerns about Bridenstine during the months-long nomination process.
The primary concern was his lack of space experience, Sens.
Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) and Bill Nelson (D-Fla.) said last September.
Critics have also pointed to his climate-denying past.
In a 2016 interview with Aerospace America, he insisted that the climate has always changed, countering any human responsibility.
“Going back to the 1600s, we have had mini ice ages from then to now.” In a June 2013 speech, he also asserted that global temperatures “stopped rising 10 years ago” and asked for an apology from then-President Barack Obama, accusing him of a “gross misallocation” of funds for climate change research instead of weather forecasting.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Students go on hunger strike to pressure Cambridge University to divest

Students go on hunger strike to pressure Cambridge University to divest

Three students at the Cambridge University have gone on hunger strike as part of an increasingly bitter campaign to stop the university investing in fossil fuel companies.
The move by the three undergraduates is part of an ongoing divestment campaign at the university that has been supported by hundreds of academics and scientists – including Sir David King, until recently the UK’s permanent special representative for climate change, Thomas Blundell, the former president of the UK Science Council and the author Robert Macfarlane.
The university, which campaigners estimate has £377m invested in fossil fuel firms both directly and indirectly, is expected to take a decision on its future investment strategy at the university’s council meeting on Monday.
A spokesperson said: “The council will consider all aspects of divestment, including ethical issues, in its response to the working group on divestment’s final report …
The objective, as the report sets out, is to promote and execute urgent and tangible action to deliver a carbon neutral future.
The university is already taking steps that must be further expanded in the areas of its investments, research, education, estate and policy decisions.” But student Sam Warren-Miell, one of the hunger strikers, said the university must fully divest from all fossil fuels.
We hope that by taking this action, we will encourage them to make the right decision on Monday and be on the right side of history.” The divestment campaign has been backed by the former archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams and the Cambridge MP Daniel Zeichner.
This week students chalk-sprayed the university administration building as the protests escalated.
The university says its investments were reviewed in 2016, when it found it had “no directly held exposure to the most pollutive industries, such as thermal coal and tar sands, and no expectation of having any such exposure in the future.” But Ben Margolis, another of the hunger strikers said: “Unless decisive action is taken quickly, we’re heading for a global temperature increase of over 2C which will be a catastrophe for the whole of humanity in our lifetimes, and we must also acknowledge that climate change is already having a devastating impact on millions of people in the global south today.
“Every day that the university continues to invest in fossil fuels, directly or indirectly, it is complicit in their suffering, and this is why we will not stop the university commits to full divestment.”

Energy

Echo Energy Announces Gas Discovery Onshore Argentina

Echo Energy Announces Gas Discovery Onshore Argentina

Latin America focused upstream oil and gas company, Echo Energy plc, has announced a gas discovery at the ELM-1004 exploration well, which is located at the company’s Fracción C asset onshore Argentina.
The well, which was drilled into the Lower Tobífera formation to a total measured depth of 5,774 feet, encountered over 130 feet of gas shows through the Upper Tobífera. “We are very excited to have confirmed the presence of a substantial gas column in this first well of our four well exploration program and look forward to the arrival of the completion rig and subsequent testing in June,” Fiona MacAulay, Echo CEO, said in a company statement.
“Meanwhile our attention turns to ELA-1 where we expect to spud the well within the next few days,” MacAulay added.
Echo announced the commencement of drilling on ELM-1004 on May 9.
The well is situated approximately 2.5 miles north east of the existing Estancia La Maggie gas collection facilities.
Generated by readers, the comments included herein do not reflect the views and opinions of Rigzone.
All comments are subject to editorial review.
Off-topic, inappropriate or insulting comments will be removed.

Organic Living

Concerned About the Environment? Choose Your Next Hometown Wisely

Concerned About the Environment? Choose Your Next Hometown Wisely

Whether you’re considering a move or looking for bragging rights for your hometown, some states of the union are far greener than others.
If You Want to Breathe the Freshest Air… Take yourself to Wyoming, the Dakotas, Vermont or New Mexico for the highest air quality.
And even though Arizona is right next door to New Mexico, avoid its temptations, given that it ranks as one of the poorest states for air quality, along with Indiana, Pennsylvania, Illinois and California.
Your veggies and flowers are far less likely to thrive in Montana, Rhode Island, Wyoming, Arizona and New Mexico, which rank as having the lowest soil quality.
If You’re a Big Believer in Recycling… You’ll find kindred spirits in Maine, Minnesota, Arkansas, California and New Hampshire when it comes to the highest percentage of recycled municipal solid waste.
The folks who don’t separate their paper and plastic are more likely to be found in Arizona, Mississippi, Alaska, Oklahoma, Utah and Louisiana.
Getting from place to place in North or South Dakota simply requires more fuel.
Love Where You Live Carbon footprint, sustainable living efforts and green energy sources all contribute to a state’s success at going green and staying green.
Vermont, Oregon, Massachusetts, New York and South Dakota hold the top five spots, respectively, for environmentally friendly states.
No state is perfect when it comes to environmental friendliness.

Wellness

Can Lifestyle Changes Remove Plaques in Your Arteries?

Can Lifestyle Changes Remove Plaques in Your Arteries?

Image Q.
Yes, lifestyle changes, including diet, smoking cessation, stress management and exercise, can decrease the size of atherosclerotic plaques.
They can also help to stabilize them so that they are less likely to break off and block blood flow, decreasing your risk of a heart attack.
The notion of plaque reduction, known medically as regression of atherosclerosis, arose from a fortuitous observation during World War II.
Norwegian scientists noticed that the scarcity of food — particularly the scarcity of high-fat foods like milk, cream, butter and cheese — was associated with a decreased risk of death from heart disease.
This suggested the possibility that dietary changes could induce plaque regression.
The first direct evidence of regression came in 1947.
Three years later, the groundbreaking Lifestyle Heart Trial extended these findings by demonstrating that lifestyle changes alone, without cholesterol-lowering medications, could bring about regression, even in severely atherosclerotic arteries.
But its findings were soon confirmed by larger studies, including a 2015 meta-analysis that combined data from all previously published trials and assessed the value of lifestyle modifications on more than 2,000 arterial plaques.
While changing established habits requires a high degree of motivation, the promise of shrinking plaque and lessening one’s risk for heart attack should be quite motivating.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending May 18, 2018

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending May 18, 2018

As last week ended, two weeks of UN sponsored talks in Bonn came to an indecisive close without a draft

Alternative Energy

Driving on Sunshine: Nissan Rolls Out Solar + Storage System

Driving on Sunshine: Nissan Rolls Out Solar + Storage System

Nissan, the maker of the world’s top-selling electric vehicle, officially rolled out on Thursday a seamless solar energy and battery storage system for homes in the UK.
The venture, called Nissan Energy Solar, allows homeowners to generate, store and charge EVs with their own renewable energy, which can reduce household energy bills by an estimated 66 percent, the company touts. “It enables UK homeowners to make significant savings on their household electricity bills, and become champions of sustainability and green technology,” said Gareth Dunsmore, the electric vehicle director of Nissan Europe, in a statement. “More than 880,000 people in the UK already use solar panels and this fully integrated solution brings a fresh opportunity to grow this number exponentially over the coming years.”
#Nissan has announced the retail launch of its integrated home energy solution for U.K. customers.
Nissan Energy So… https://t.co/0fmgwu7cim — Nissan Motor (@NissanMotor) 1526538661.0 The Japanese automaker’s new offering allows UK customers to choose between a fully integrated solar and storage package or just the components alone.
System prices start at around £3,800 (about $5,100).
Notably, customers can pick between a storage system made of new batteries or old ones from Nissan electric vehicles.
This is a great move to give a “second life” to batteries that have degraded to a point where they are no longer suitable for the road but are useful for other purposes.
Impressively, Nissan is driving into the home energy market without backing from a traditional utility, the Telegraph reported.

Oceans

“A Beautiful Gem in the South Pacific”: Scientists on Rose Atoll

“A Beautiful Gem in the South Pacific”: Scientists on Rose Atoll

Rose Atoll is a pink jewel on the South Pacific blue horizon.
Though its emergent reefs and islands cover just around 20 acres, it carries meaning well beyond what we see: as the southernmost point in the U.S. through American Samoa, as the centerpiece of a federally-protected Marine National Monument and National Wildlife Refuge, and as a pristine haven for ocean wildlife.
Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge was designated in 1973 to protect the area’s biodiversity, and expanded in 2009 as a marine national monument to safeguard over 8 million acres of healthy ocean habitat.
To help celebrate this unique wonder, we reached out to scientists to learn about Rose Atoll and why protecting it is so important.
“Rose Atoll Marine National Monument is America’s southernmost coral reef system.
This near pristine reef is an isolated natural laboratory, preserved from tuna fishing and other extractive uses, like giant clamming.
Its tiny land base has been cleared of invasive rats and is home to myriad seabirds.” “Rose Atoll and its surrounding deep ocean habitats have much to teach us about the complicated interplay of biology, geology, and chemistry.
This exquisite pink atoll was created by vulcanism, and beautiful forms of marine algae that can make calcium carbonate reefs that enable them to grow to stay within the range of sunlight as the bottom subsides.
Unfortunately, Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke has recommended that President Trump shrink Rose Atoll Marine National Monument to allow for industrial fishing.
We’re working with other environmental groups to raise awareness about this threat and defend our priceless public lands and waters.

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Conservation & Sustainability

Trump’s NASA Chief Has Apparently Changed His Tune On Climate Change

Trump’s NASA Chief Has Apparently Changed His Tune On Climate Change

Jim Bridenstine, Donald Trump’s pick as NASA administrator, appeared to change his tune on climate change during his first employee town hall since he was confirmed to the position, acknowledging that human beings contribute significantly to the warming of the planet.
“I don’t deny that consensus that the climate is changing.
In fact, I fully believe and know that the climate is changing.
“It’s going to depend on a whole lot of factors, and we’re still learning more about that every day,” he said last November.
He was narrowly confirmed by the Senate 50-49, and politicians on both sides of the aisle shared their concerns about Bridenstine during the months-long nomination process.
The primary concern was his lack of space experience, Sens.
Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) and Bill Nelson (D-Fla.) said last September.
Critics have also pointed to his climate-denying past.
In a 2016 interview with Aerospace America, he insisted that the climate has always changed, countering any human responsibility.
“Going back to the 1600s, we have had mini ice ages from then to now.” In a June 2013 speech, he also asserted that global temperatures “stopped rising 10 years ago” and asked for an apology from then-President Barack Obama, accusing him of a “gross misallocation” of funds for climate change research instead of weather forecasting.

Conservation & Sustainability

National Geographic’s Clever New Cover Contains Chilling Warning About Plastics

National Geographic’s Clever New Cover Contains Chilling Warning About Plastics

National Geographic warns of the devastating effects that plastics are having on the planet with a clever cover for its June edition.
The cover image shows an iceberg-resembling plastic bag partially submerged in the ocean: The 18 billion pieces of plastic that end up in the ocean each year are “just the tip of the iceberg,” the caption says.
National Geographic’s senior photo editor, Vaughn Wallace, shared the image of the cover — created by Mexican artist Jorge Gamboa — to Twitter on Wednesday.
It’s now going viral, with hundreds of people praising the publication for taking on the important topic in such a thought-provoking way: National Geographic is launching a “Planet or Plastic?” campaign with the new issue, which aims to reduce global reliance on single-use plastics.
As part of the initiative, National Geographic has swapped the magazine’s plastic wrappers in the U.S., United Kingdom and India for paper.
“Will eliminating a plastic magazine wrapper save the planet?
But it’s an example of the kind of relatively easy action that every company, every government, and every person can take,” wrote editor-in-chief Susan Goldberg.
“And when you put it together, that adds up to real change,” she added.
In February, a sperm whale was discovered dead off the coast of southeast Spain with 64 pounds of plastic trash inside its digestive system.
Researchers predict that by 2025, up to 38 millions bits of plastic waste could annually enter oceans unless radical action is taken.

Conservation & Sustainability

This forest is vanishing. Its spices could save it

This forest is vanishing. Its spices could save it

Andrew Billingsley of Conservation International was having a cup of tea one afternoon with a woman shopkeeper in Tatai Leu Village near the Central Cardamom Mountains National Park (CCMNP) in Cambodia.
The area gets its name from the cardamom that grows in abundance there and is used in coffee, curry and tea the world over.
Billingsley got to thinking about the spice.
To protect the Southeast Asian country’s rapidly disappearing forests.
“I worry about the forest disappearing and how people will be able to survive without it.” Chan oversees one of three nearby villages that border the CCMNP and together have a population of more than 800 people.
As part of a new strategy to boost incomes, sustain livelihoods and protect the forest, Conservation International is helping villagers develop and sell non-timber forest products such as cardamom, lemongrass essential oil, and ingredients for incense and perfume.
Agarwood forms when aquilaria trees are infected with a specific fungus — think of it as a response to a disease.
Only about 10 percent of trees develop this infection in the wild, and in the past, agarwood “hunters” harvested extracts sustainably: They could tell which trees were infected by looking for a certain kind of fly that burrows into the tree, and they would carve out small sections of a tree every few years.
Along with working to protect the remaining wild trees, Conservation International is integrating agarwood production as part of forest restoration efforts.
As for the cardamom?

Conservation & Sustainability

Scott Pruitt Got 24/7 Security From Day 1 At EPA, New Documents Show

Scott Pruitt Got 24/7 Security From Day 1 At EPA, New Documents Show

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt was granted around-the-clock security starting his first day on the job after he personally requested it, new documents reveal.
EPA Inspector General Arthur Elkins said in a letter to senators on Monday that Pruitt requested 24/7 protection “once he was confirmed as Administrator.” Don Benton, then a senior White House adviser supervising the EPA, also asked for around-the-clock security for Pruitt for at least his first week on the job, according to emails obtained by The Washington Post.
“There will be several Executive Orders signed when [Pruitt] is sworn in that will likely stir the hornets nest and with the security issue in the Atlanta office last week as well as the lady who threatened former administrator [Gina] McCarthy not showing up for court and at large in DC it is best to be on the safe side,” Benton wrote on Feb. 12, 2017.
The EPA in the past has justified Pruitt’s security expenses as necessary because of a sharp uptick in threats against him, including what a spokesman referred to as “an unprecedented amount of death threats.” Pruitt reportedly was “approached at the airport numerous times, to the point of profanities being yelled at him.” The agency hadn’t before revealed that Pruitt’s extensive security began his first day on the job.
Pruitt’s enhanced security detail, three times the size of his predecessor, has cost taxpayers almost $3 million, The Associated Press reported last month.
The hefty price, along with Pruitt’s lavish spending on worldwide travel and his ethical lapses, have kept him under a cloud of controversy.
Although President Donald Trump has come to Pruitt’s defense amid calls for his ouster, the White House admitted for the first time last week that the ethical issues have “raised some concerns.”

Conservation & Sustainability

How to stop a humanitarian disaster before it happens

How to stop a humanitarian disaster before it happens

In fact, weather forecasting technology has improved so dramatically that humanitarian organizations can now fund disaster relief before disaster hits.
Support Grist “We think this is a game-changer, not only for the Red Cross and Red Crescent, but for humanitarian action as a whole,” said Pascale Meige, who runs the program for the Red Cross, in a statement.
The program has been in the works for years, but is now available to anyone the Red Cross and Red Crescent serves, anywhere in the world.
A hurricane forecast looking out five days is now as precise as a three-day forecast a decade ago — that’s two extra days for people in harm’s way to make preparations.
In remote places where humanitarian organizations like the Red Cross do much of their work, the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting, or ECMWF, often provides the best forecasts.
Since the advent of computer-based weather prediction in the 1950s, the National Weather Service’s computer capacity has increased by a factor of 100 billion.
Some of the world’s fastest computers are now devoted to predicting the weather.
But deciding how best to use that information to save lives remains a revolution in progress.
Traditional disaster relief financing relies on contributions from concerned, wealthy citizens who hear about the catastrophe and care enough to donate long after the worst has already happened.
The Red Cross’s new model uses weather forecasts and an associated permanent fund to immediately disburse money to areas about to be hit with extreme weather.

Conservation & Sustainability

Can White Canvas Bags Reduce Deer-Vehicle Collisions?

Can White Canvas Bags Reduce Deer-Vehicle Collisions?

And they may be more effective at allowing deer to cross roads safely than more costly methods.
The study was designed to test the effectiveness of wildlife reflectors that are being deployed globally help animals cross roads safely.
In the course of testing the reflectors, according to research published in the Wildlife Society Bulletin, researchers found that reflectors covered in white canvas bags as a control were more effective than the actual reflectors.
How Did the Deer Cross the Road?
Reflectors were installed along roads.
As controls, researchers covered some of the reflectors periodically with white bags and with black bags.
While the reflectors were moderately more effective than those covered with black bags, the white bags were the most effective of all.
But the white bags, in this study, were found to be more effective.
Wildlife reflectors cost $25 each compared to just $1.50 for a white canvas bag.
Whatever the case, Riginos says that “White bags could add another tool to our toolbox in areas where we can’t install crossing structures.

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Climate Change & Global Warming

Students go on hunger strike to pressure Cambridge University to divest

Students go on hunger strike to pressure Cambridge University to divest

Three students at the Cambridge University have gone on hunger strike as part of an increasingly bitter campaign to stop the university investing in fossil fuel companies.
The move by the three undergraduates is part of an ongoing divestment campaign at the university that has been supported by hundreds of academics and scientists – including Sir David King, until recently the UK’s permanent special representative for climate change, Thomas Blundell, the former president of the UK Science Council and the author Robert Macfarlane.
The university, which campaigners estimate has £377m invested in fossil fuel firms both directly and indirectly, is expected to take a decision on its future investment strategy at the university’s council meeting on Monday.
A spokesperson said: “The council will consider all aspects of divestment, including ethical issues, in its response to the working group on divestment’s final report …
The objective, as the report sets out, is to promote and execute urgent and tangible action to deliver a carbon neutral future.
The university is already taking steps that must be further expanded in the areas of its investments, research, education, estate and policy decisions.” But student Sam Warren-Miell, one of the hunger strikers, said the university must fully divest from all fossil fuels.
We hope that by taking this action, we will encourage them to make the right decision on Monday and be on the right side of history.” The divestment campaign has been backed by the former archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams and the Cambridge MP Daniel Zeichner.
This week students chalk-sprayed the university administration building as the protests escalated.
The university says its investments were reviewed in 2016, when it found it had “no directly held exposure to the most pollutive industries, such as thermal coal and tar sands, and no expectation of having any such exposure in the future.” But Ben Margolis, another of the hunger strikers said: “Unless decisive action is taken quickly, we’re heading for a global temperature increase of over 2C which will be a catastrophe for the whole of humanity in our lifetimes, and we must also acknowledge that climate change is already having a devastating impact on millions of people in the global south today.
“Every day that the university continues to invest in fossil fuels, directly or indirectly, it is complicit in their suffering, and this is why we will not stop the university commits to full divestment.”

Climate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending May 18, 2018

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending May 18, 2018

As last week ended, two weeks of UN sponsored talks in Bonn came to an indecisive close without a draft

Climate Change & Global Warming

Remember when were told sea creatures couldn’t run from global warming? Never mind.

Remember when were told sea creatures couldn’t run from global warming? Never mind.

Marine animals have been following their preferred climate for millions of years Researchers at FAU discover prehistoric migration due to changes in temperature Current global warming has far-reaching ecological consequences, also for the Earth’s oceans.
Many marine organisms are reacting by migrating towards the poles.
Researchers at Geozentrum Nordbayern at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered that marine animals have been migrating for millions of years when the temperature on Earth increases or decreases.
‘Whilst the climate appears to be changing more rapidly today than ever before, the climate also changed rapidly in the past, forcing organisms to migrate in order to survive.
Isotherms (geographic lines denoting the same temperature, for example 20°C) shift towards the poles or the equator as soon as the global temperature rises or decreases.
Isotherms have been shifting towards the poles for several years due to global warming.
Using a model, they determined how the tectonic plates have moved since the time when the animals were living and combined the results with the current coordinates of the location where the fossil samples were discovered.
Wolfgang Kießling and Carl Reddin expect that the current shifts will affect mostly tropical species, and it is thought that there will be a significant reduction of such species in the long run.
### The paper: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/geb.12732 Guest essay by Eric Worrall Listed amongst this year’s achievements is the climate gender action plan and an initiative for technology sharing.
The GOES-R series of satellites (which includes GOES-16 and the recently launched GOES-17)… A Finnish climate action group is raising $500,000 to carve President Trump’s face into an arctic iceberg according to a press release I received.

Climate Change & Global Warming

California’s Boneheaded Solar Remedy for Climate Change

California’s Boneheaded Solar Remedy for Climate Change

Good intentions can make for awful policies.
For an example of the latter, look west, where the California Energy Commission just decreed that starting in 2020, new homes must be equipped with solar panels.
Commissioner Andrew McAllister boasted that the rule “will propel the state even further down the road to a low emissions future.” He has the right idea.
With environmental vandals in charge of the federal government, the state’s leaders are justifiably motivated to do what they can to combat climate change.
University of California, Berkeley economist Severin Borenstein told the commission that he and the vast majority of energy economists “believe that residential rooftop solar is a much more expensive way to move towards renewable energy than larger solar and wind installations.” No kidding.
The National Renewable Energy Laboratory figures that on a kilowatt-hour basis, electricity from home solar panels costs 2 1/2 times more than electricity from large solar facilities operated by utilities.
The GOES-R series of satellites (which includes GOES-16 and the recently launched GOES-17)… A Finnish climate action group is raising $500,000 to carve President Trump’s face into an arctic iceberg according to a press release I received.
This month marks the 50th anniversary of one of the most destructive books of the last century, The Population Bomb, by Paul Ehrlich.
Every Google search comes at a cost to the planet.
Carbon satellite to serve as an important tool for politicians and climate change experts A new satellite that measures and provides detailed carbon balance information is one of… From the “but wait, I thought only CO2 had the power to change the climate” department comes this revelation.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Study: Globalization could undermine efforts to reduce CO2 emissions

Study: Globalization could undermine efforts to reduce CO2 emissions

New research reveals the growth of carbon production from Chinese exports has slowed or reversed, reflecting a “new phase of globalisation” between developing countries that could undermine international efforts to reduce emissions.
Some production activities are relocating from China and India to other developing countries, such as Indonesia, Vietnam and Thailand, particularly for raw materials and intermediate goods production in energy-intensive sectors.
International trade increased by more than 50% from 2005 to 2015, with approximately 60% of the increase tied to rising exports from developing countries.
Publishing their findings in Nature Communications, the authors warn this trend may seriously undermine international efforts to reduce global emissions that increasingly rely on rallying voluntary contributions of more, smaller, and less-developed nations.
It follows research published last month in Geophysical Research Letters, in which the authors argue that the Chinese export-embodied CO2 emissions have peaked due to the changing structure of Chinese production.
Co-author on both studies Dabo Guan, professor in climate change economics at UEA’s School of International Development, said: “The rapid growth in South-South trade reflects a fragmenting of global supply chains whereby early-production stages of many industries have relocated from countries like China and India to lower-wage economies, a trend that has accelerated since the global financial crisis in 2008.
“Successfully mitigating climate change therefore urgently depends on decarbonising not only energy systems in developed countries but also the entire process of industrialization.” The researchers used the latest available data on international trade and CO2 emissions from 2004, 2007 and 2011 to track emissions related to both intermediate and final goods and services from 57 industry sectors that were traded among 129 regions (101 of which are individual countries).
In total, CO2 emissions embodied in goods and services exported from developing countries increased by 46% between 2004 and 2011, from 2.2 to 3.3 gigatonnes (Gts).
The GOES-R series of satellites (which includes GOES-16 and the recently launched GOES-17)… A Finnish climate action group is raising $500,000 to carve President Trump’s face into an arctic iceberg according to a press release I received.
This month marks the 50th anniversary of one of the most destructive books of the last century, The Population Bomb, by Paul Ehrlich.

Climate Change & Global Warming

New Scientist: Climate Change will be Even Worse than our Worst Worse Case Scenario

New Scientist: Climate Change will be Even Worse than our Worst Worse Case Scenario

Guest essay by Eric Worrall How much worse can it get?
Worst-case climate change scenario is even worse than we thought DAILY NEWS 14 May 2018 By Michael Le Page The phrase “worse than we thought” is a cliché when it comes to climate change.
There are lots of studies suggesting we’re in for more warming and worse consequences than thought, and few saying it won’t be as bad.
It assumes rapid, unfettered economic growth and rampant burning of fossil fuels.
It now seems RCP8.5 may have underestimated the emissions that would result if we follow the economic path it describes.
… Read more: https://www.newscientist.com/article/2168847-worst-case-climate-change-scenario-is-even-worse-than-we-thought/ Stay tuned for the next New Scientist article on climate change, when they shall reveal that climate change will be worse than the even worse than worst worse case scenario they predicted.
Correction (EW): New Scientist, not Scientific American… Guest essay by Eric Worrall Listed amongst this year’s achievements is the climate gender action plan and an initiative for technology sharing.
The NOAA GOES East satellite (GOES-16) witnessed a frightening display of stratiform, or ‘spider’ lightning as it’s known, in October 2017 over the central plains in the U.S.
The GOES-R series of satellites (which includes GOES-16 and the recently launched GOES-17)… A Finnish climate action group is raising $500,000 to carve President Trump’s face into an arctic iceberg according to a press release I received.
From the years 2009 to 2015, between 100 and… In ancient rocks, scientists see a climate cycle working across deep time.

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