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Climate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending June 15, 2018

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending June 15, 2018

This has been a busy news week. Four states in the US held primaries Tuesday, each with either real or

Climate Change & Global Warming

Good News! 99.989% of the Antarctic Ice Sheet Didn’t Melt!

Good News! 99.989% of the Antarctic Ice Sheet Didn’t Melt!

Guest lampooning by David Middleton 99.989% rounds up to 100%.
This is fantastic news… Unless you’re a Warmunist.
Fortunately for Warmunists, Science News tailors their headlines to your preferences…
Antarctica has lost about 3 trillion metric tons of ice since 1992 Ice loss is accelerating and that’s helped raise the global sea level by about 8 millimeters
An international team of scientists has combined data from two dozen satellite surveys in the most comprehensive assessment of Antarctica’s ice sheet mass yet.
The conclusion: The frozen continent lost an estimated 2,720 billion metric tons of ice from 1992 to 2017, and most of that loss occurred in recent years, particularly in West Antarctica.
About two-fifths of that rise occurred in the last five years, an increase in severity that is helping scientists understand how the ice sheet is responding to climate change.
Area (km2) Volume (km3) Mass (Gt) Significance of 3 trillion metric tons East Antarctica 10,153,170 75% 26,039,200 86% 23,870,135 0.013% West Antarctica 1,918,170 14% 3,262,000 11% 2,990,275 0.100% Antarctic Peninsula 446,690 3% 227,100 1% 208,183 1.441% Ross Ice Shelf 536,070 4% 229,600 1% 210,474 1.425% Ronne-Filchner ice shelves 532,200 4% 351,900 1% 322,587 0.930% Antarctic ice sheet 13,586,400 100% 30,109,800 100% 27,601,654 0.011% Ice sheet areas and volumes are from USGS Professional Paper 1386–A–2: State of the Earth’s Cryosphere at the Beginning of the 21st Century: Glaciers, Global Snow Cover, Floating Ice, and Permafrost and Periglacial Environments.
Zero-point-zero-one-one percent is indistinguishable from Mr. Blutarski’s grade point average… Even if all of the melting was from the only place in Antarctica that’s actually losing ice (only slightly sarcastic), the Antarctic Peninsula, it would only be 1.441%… Leaving 98.559% of the ice on the Antarctic Peninsula un-melted, along with 100% of the ice on the other 99% of the Antarctic Ice Sheet.
But, but, but… What about the 8 millimeters of sea level rise?

Energy

What’s New About Renewable Energy?

What’s New About Renewable Energy?

The centerpiece of a green marketing message that was planned for the upcoming back-to-school season was a new solar farm being built on Crayola land and linked directly to the crayon manufacturing facility.
In terms of sustainable supply chains, this initiative was much more serious than the easy alternative of buying carbon offsets.
It was a hardcore investment in renewable energy at a time when only around 5% of global electricity generation came from renewable sources.
Crayola was dead serious about sustainability, but I still wonder whether customers ever appreciated it.
The reason is simple, it is a better deal.
Our annual Future of Supply Chain survey has asked about investment plans in renewable energy since 2015.
The results show a steady increase in the share of respondents who say it has a financial payback.
Maybe it’s about the cost savings first.
Second, consider the possibility of in-sourcing power generation rather than buying exclusively from utilities.
Supply Chain 2020: It’s Already Too Late Crayola was ahead of its time.

Organic Living

Five ways students can go zero waste

Five ways students can go zero waste

How time flies!
So for all you students out there, here are five ways to enjoy student life AND reduce your impact on the environment!
Reduce food waste One of the simplest ways you can reduce waste (and save money) is to be mindful of the food you buy.
According to Exeter University, students waste on average 780g each per week of food.
You can bulk buy the ingredients to reduce costs.
Hold a screening A documentary viewing is easy to do and provides great insights for discussion.
Make some swaps Next time a disposable item runs out, see what reusable alternative there are.
Try reusable pads or the mooncup for monthly periods, swap disposable razor blades for a safety razor, try washable cloths instead of kitchen towel and consider using a fountain pen instead of biros.
), but over the months the savings really add up.
What about you – how do you reduce your waste?

Wellness

How To Tell If Your Period Isn’t Normal

How To Tell If Your Period Isn’t Normal

I was so fascinated with everything that goes on with my body every month, I was eager to have my period finally start.
Sometimes it’s a one- or two-month situation, and sometimes cycle issues can last years.
The best way to start troubleshooting issues like PMS, endometriosis, PCOS, and more is to start paying close attention to your period and using it as a barometer of how well your diet and lifestyle are supporting your hormones.
If your cycle isn’t as I described above, then it’s time to immediately make dietary changes to get your cycle back to a healthy flow.
Here’s a guide for you to use for interpreting the color of your cycle every month.
The problem: A short period (less than three days in length) and/or very light bleeding can indicate low estrogen levels.
Your hormones are made from the food you eat, so your low estrogen is likely due to vitamin and nutrient deficiencies from improper or extreme dieting as well as from adrenal burnout.
Missing periods, PMS symptoms, delayed periods, frequent periods, and spotting are all things you should take seriously—asking your health care provider about these symptoms is a good place to start, specifically one who has a holistic approach to women’s health.
Just think what the right foods can do for your PMS in one to three cycles!
When you see something that isn’t what it should be, you can start making changes to your diet and lifestyle accordingly.

Conservation & Sustainability

New Research: Savanna Burning for Global Emissions Reductions

New Research: Savanna Burning for Global Emissions Reductions

But new research from The Nature Conservancy demonstrates that fire management in savannas has the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions, helping developing nations meet their contributions toward the Paris Agreement.
There, the Conservancy worked with the Indigenous Land Corporation and Aboriginal landowners to reduce carbon emissions by implementing a fire-management plan that combines traditional knowledge and western science.
“When fires occur later in the dry season, the grasses are so much drier and the fire burns more intensely over greater area, and so releases more greenhouse gases,” says Nicholas Wolff, a climate scientist at the Conservancy.
By deliberately setting small, controlled burns early in the dry season, when it’s cooler and wetter, Fish River managers were able to reduce the fuel load and fire intensity, as well as prevent large-scale, late-season wildfires.
Six years later, savanna burning projects are underway across 32 million hectares of northern Australia, and a portion of those projects have secured contracts under the national carbon market to abate 13.8 million tonnes of CO2 equivalent over the next 7 to 10 years.
“With fire these gases are a net addition into the atmosphere, so anything you can do to control the intensity and amount of fire will cut back on those emissions.” Their results, published in Nature Communications, show that 70 percent of emissions from global savanna fires occur in the late dry season, presenting significant opportunities for abatement.
They identified 37 countries with significant late dry season emissions that could be greatly reduced through early-dry-season fire management.
Together, they produce 99.9 percent of total net emissions from all savanna fires, representing an abatement potential of 89.3 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalents per year.
Transforming Lives Through Fire In Australia, the benefits of savanna burning go far beyond emissions abatement.
“We’re seeing economic, social, biodiversity and climate benefits… where else in our conservation work do we get so many wins?”

Alternative Energy

Global Carbon Emissions on the Rise Again Due to Coal Comeback

Global Carbon Emissions on the Rise Again Due to Coal Comeback

Global carbon dioxide emissions from energy use increased 1.6 percent in 2017 following three years of stagnation, according to a new report from British oil giant BP.
The analysis, published Wednesday, further emphasizes worldwide failure to meet the goals struck by the Paris agreement to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. “It suggests to me we are not on a path to the Paris climate goals,” he added.
The report, called the BP Statistical Review of World Energy, also pointed out that the world’s fuel mix has “strikingly” not changed in the last 20 years. “I am more worried by the lack of progress in the power sector over the past 20 years, than by the pickup in carbon emissions last year,” Dale noted to the Guardian.
The report revealed that the increase in greenhouse gas emissions was driven by a 2.2 percent increase in global energy demand last year, as well as increased coal consumption for the first time in four years, led by growing demand in India and China.
The UK and Denmark reported the lowest carbon emissions in their history.
While renewable power generation grew by 17 percent, with wind and solar driving much of that growth, the success of clean energy was clouded by the world’s increased appetite for fossil fuels. “We continue to believe that gains in the power sector are the most efficient way to drive down carbon emissions in coming decades.”
2017 was a record-breaking year for #renewables, but more needs to be done to meet #ParisAgreement goals… https://t.co/TitHKDKkX8 — DiCaprio Foundation (@dicapriofdn) 1528133445.0

Oceans

Deep-Sea Coral Expedition to California’s Channel Islands

Deep-Sea Coral Expedition to California’s Channel Islands

Marine biologists have discovered deep-sea coral ecosystems throughout the oceans from the tropics to the polar seas, but only in very limited locations.
And, most importantly, we can’t protect these areas if we don’t know where they are.
Deep-sea corals are also important sources of new biomedical discoveries, yielding pharmaceuticals and synthetic materials.
A New Partnership Marine Conservation Institute and Marine Applied Research and Exploration (MARE) are teaming up to discover and protect these biodiverse deep-sea ecosystems.
There is an urgent need to develop non-destructive methods for locating and documenting deep-sea coral and sponge ecosystems across vast areas of the seafloor so that they can be protected.
Marine Conservation Institute has developed robust scientific methods for modelling habitats that are likely to contain deep-sea corals and sponges.
This processed data is then fed back into predictive models to allow for improved model refinement and to identify new areas to explore.
We will conduct additional cruises to test and improve our methodology in other areas.
Because California is home to so many world-class marine research institutions that provide high-quality and extensive existing bathymetric data, it is an ideal place for testing and improving our methods for finding deep-sea corals and sponges.
The Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC) manages fishing in the federal waters off Washington, Oregon, and California.

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Conservation & Sustainability

New Research: Savanna Burning for Global Emissions Reductions

New Research: Savanna Burning for Global Emissions Reductions

But new research from The Nature Conservancy demonstrates that fire management in savannas has the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions, helping developing nations meet their contributions toward the Paris Agreement.
There, the Conservancy worked with the Indigenous Land Corporation and Aboriginal landowners to reduce carbon emissions by implementing a fire-management plan that combines traditional knowledge and western science.
“When fires occur later in the dry season, the grasses are so much drier and the fire burns more intensely over greater area, and so releases more greenhouse gases,” says Nicholas Wolff, a climate scientist at the Conservancy.
By deliberately setting small, controlled burns early in the dry season, when it’s cooler and wetter, Fish River managers were able to reduce the fuel load and fire intensity, as well as prevent large-scale, late-season wildfires.
Six years later, savanna burning projects are underway across 32 million hectares of northern Australia, and a portion of those projects have secured contracts under the national carbon market to abate 13.8 million tonnes of CO2 equivalent over the next 7 to 10 years.
“With fire these gases are a net addition into the atmosphere, so anything you can do to control the intensity and amount of fire will cut back on those emissions.” Their results, published in Nature Communications, show that 70 percent of emissions from global savanna fires occur in the late dry season, presenting significant opportunities for abatement.
They identified 37 countries with significant late dry season emissions that could be greatly reduced through early-dry-season fire management.
Together, they produce 99.9 percent of total net emissions from all savanna fires, representing an abatement potential of 89.3 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalents per year.
Transforming Lives Through Fire In Australia, the benefits of savanna burning go far beyond emissions abatement.
“We’re seeing economic, social, biodiversity and climate benefits… where else in our conservation work do we get so many wins?”

Conservation & Sustainability

I Need Plastic Straws To Drink. I Also Want To Save The Environment.

I Need Plastic Straws To Drink. I Also Want To Save The Environment.

People with disabilities want to save the planet.
However, I have continued to use plastic straws at restaurants and other public establishments because drinking is necessary, and plastic straws are what’s available.
Some have suggested providing reusable or compostable straws as the answer.
The first time I ordered a drink, it came without a straw, and I learned the cruise line no longer provides them as part of their efforts to reduce plastic.
This is laudable, but I immediately worried I’d have problems getting straws during my trip, which I need to consume my drinks.
Efforts to develop alternatives to plastic straws should continue as well, but they must include the disability community.
It’s also important to remember that banning plastic straws are only one very small way to reduce plastic and help the environment.
As someone who depends on plastic straws as a means to drink, I believe it’s important to explore alternatives that the disability community can use and afford.
People with disabilities want to save the planet.
Banning plastic straws entirely is not the answer.

Conservation & Sustainability

Recovery: New Life in Coal Country

Recovery: New Life in Coal Country

Consider the rebirth of West Virginia’s Cheat River.
T & T Fuels Inc. owner, Paul Thomas, and his mine superintendent, Clyde Bishoff, had circumvented costs and The Clean Water Act by piping their AMD into an abandoned mine.
The pH of Cheat Lake, 20 miles downstream, dropped to 4.
The disaster propelled the Cheat to American Rivers’ list of most endangered rivers and inspired formation of Friends of the Cheat, a group that works to protect and improve the watershed, especially by raising money to treat AMD from bondless, pre-SMCRA abandoned mines.
Fifteen of these projects are “passive,” meaning limestone-lined channels and wetlands do the work.
Now Friends of Blackwater is designing a modern passive project that will drop the yellow boy in settling ponds.
So many acid sources enter West Virginia’s Middle Fork River that neither passive treatment nor dosers are practical.
In September 2017, the team found young-of-the-year brook trout.
Much of the Susquehanna River system is polluted with AMD, but good things are happening there as well.
For example, about 2,500 miles of AMD-impaired stream remain in West Virginia, 3,000 in Pennsylvania.

Conservation & Sustainability

Winds Fanning Colorado Wildfires Won’t Die Down Until Tuesday

Winds Fanning Colorado Wildfires Won’t Die Down Until Tuesday

June 11 (Reuters) – Gusting winds driving the flames of a largely uncontrolled wildfire are expected to keep fanning the blaze through an 11th day on Monday on the bone-dry hills of southwest Colorado, where more than 2,000 homes have already been evacuated.
“This is not good news for them,” said Bob Oravec, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service’s Weather Prediction Center in College Park, Maryland.
That’s a bad combination,” he said.
Handout .
/ Reuters More powerful wind gusts of 35-45 mph helped drive a largely unchecked wildfire north of Durango to nearly double in size from Saturday to Sunday.
While the winds were dropping on Monday to about 25 mph, Oravec said it was only modest good news.
“It’s still a fan on the fire,” Oravec said.
“The terrain is rough and inaccessible in many areas,” the report said.
The NWS has placed large portions of the so-called Four Corners region of Utah, Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona under a red flag warning of extreme fire danger due to the dry conditions.
A near-record 10 million acres (4 million hectares) were burned in U.S. wildfires in 2017, the National Interagency Coordination Center said.

Conservation & Sustainability

Lava From Kilaeua Volcano Has Destroyed 600 Homes In Hawaii

Lava From Kilaeua Volcano Has Destroyed 600 Homes In Hawaii

PAHOA, Hawaii (Reuters) – Approximately 600 homes have been destroyed by lava flows on Hawaii’s Big Island since the current eruption of Kilaeua Volcano began early last month, Hawaii County Mayor Harry Kim said on Thursday.
The latest estimate of property losses from Kilauea, one of the world’s most active volcanoes, far surpasses the 215 structures consumed by lava during more than 30 years of an earlier eruption cycle that began in 1983.
Terray Sylvester / Reuters Kim said it also marks Kilauea’s most destructive episode in modern history.
His appraisal came moments after Governor David Ige, on a visit to Hawaii County Civil Defense headquarters in Hilo, the island’s biggest city, signed a memorandum of understanding furnishing millions of dollars in state disaster relief to the island.
County civil defense officials had a day earlier put the confirmed number of homes destroyed during the past month at 130, all of them in and around the Leilani Estates community, where lava-spouting fissures opened up on the volcano’s eastern flank on May 3.
More recently a huge river of lava that has crept several miles across the landscape to the eastern tip of the island has engulfed two entire seaside housing subdivisions, burying hundreds more homes there, while vaporizing a small freshwater lake and filling in an inlet called Kapoho Bay.
An estimated 2,500 people have been displaced by evacuations across the island and geologists have said they have no idea how much longer the eruption will continue.

Conservation & Sustainability

The Restaurant Chain With Nothing But Food Waste On The Menu

It was a cold November afternoon in 2013, and Roetert was working as a store manager for Albert Heijn, one of the Netherlands’ largest grocery chains.
The trio pitched Instock, a pop-up restaurant in central Amsterdam that would serve meals made entirely out of surplus food from the supermarket chain they worked for.
It also runs a school food waste program that offers resources and lesson plans to help teach children where food comes from, why food waste is bad and how it can be prevented.
“At the time we founded Instock, there was lots of talk about this issue, but we actually wanted to do something about it,” Roetert explained.
From the start, the important thing for Instock was creating somewhere people would want to eat, Roetert said.
Instock runs a free collection service to “rescue” leftover fruit, veggies, bread and dried food from Albert Heijn, but surplus fresh fish and meat come directly from suppliers.
“It’s a bit more chaotic, not knowing what you’re going to get,” said Instore’s head chef Lucas Jeffries.
In that sense, it was a way to teach Albert Heijn about its own food waste.
They realized they had more food waste in their operations than they thought.” Food waste efforts in the Netherlands are now focusing on scaling up, said Timmermans ― something Instock is doing through its online shop with the aim of “rescuing” 110 million pounds of food by 2030 (the current total is around 880,000 pounds).
If you have an idea or tip for the editorial series, send an email to thisnewworld@huffpost.com.

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Climate Change & Global Warming

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending June 15, 2018

Climate Change Week in Review Week Ending June 15, 2018

This has been a busy news week. Four states in the US held primaries Tuesday, each with either real or

Climate Change & Global Warming

Good News! 99.989% of the Antarctic Ice Sheet Didn’t Melt!

Good News! 99.989% of the Antarctic Ice Sheet Didn’t Melt!

Guest lampooning by David Middleton 99.989% rounds up to 100%.
This is fantastic news… Unless you’re a Warmunist.
Fortunately for Warmunists, Science News tailors their headlines to your preferences…
Antarctica has lost about 3 trillion metric tons of ice since 1992 Ice loss is accelerating and that’s helped raise the global sea level by about 8 millimeters
An international team of scientists has combined data from two dozen satellite surveys in the most comprehensive assessment of Antarctica’s ice sheet mass yet.
The conclusion: The frozen continent lost an estimated 2,720 billion metric tons of ice from 1992 to 2017, and most of that loss occurred in recent years, particularly in West Antarctica.
About two-fifths of that rise occurred in the last five years, an increase in severity that is helping scientists understand how the ice sheet is responding to climate change.
Area (km2) Volume (km3) Mass (Gt) Significance of 3 trillion metric tons East Antarctica 10,153,170 75% 26,039,200 86% 23,870,135 0.013% West Antarctica 1,918,170 14% 3,262,000 11% 2,990,275 0.100% Antarctic Peninsula 446,690 3% 227,100 1% 208,183 1.441% Ross Ice Shelf 536,070 4% 229,600 1% 210,474 1.425% Ronne-Filchner ice shelves 532,200 4% 351,900 1% 322,587 0.930% Antarctic ice sheet 13,586,400 100% 30,109,800 100% 27,601,654 0.011% Ice sheet areas and volumes are from USGS Professional Paper 1386–A–2: State of the Earth’s Cryosphere at the Beginning of the 21st Century: Glaciers, Global Snow Cover, Floating Ice, and Permafrost and Periglacial Environments.
Zero-point-zero-one-one percent is indistinguishable from Mr. Blutarski’s grade point average… Even if all of the melting was from the only place in Antarctica that’s actually losing ice (only slightly sarcastic), the Antarctic Peninsula, it would only be 1.441%… Leaving 98.559% of the ice on the Antarctic Peninsula un-melted, along with 100% of the ice on the other 99% of the Antarctic Ice Sheet.
But, but, but… What about the 8 millimeters of sea level rise?

Climate Change & Global Warming

Astronomers detect diamond dust shimmering around distant stars

Astronomers detect diamond dust shimmering around distant stars

“This is the first clear detection of anomalous microwave emission coming from protoplanetary disks,” said David Frayer a coauthor on the paper and astronomer with the Green Bank Observatory.
Other protoplanetary disks throughout the Milky Way, however, have the clear infrared signature of PAHs yet show no signs of the AME light.
This strongly suggests that PAHs are not the mysterious source of anomalous microwave radiation, as astronomers once thought.
Rather, hydrogenated nanodiamonds, which form naturally within protoplanetary disks and are found in meteorites on Earth, are the most likely source of AME light in our galaxy.
For their research, the astronomers used the GBT and ATCA to survey 14 young stars across the Milky Way for hints of anomalous microwave emission.
AME was clearly seen in 3 of the 14 stars, which are also the only 3 stars of the 14 that show the IR spectral signature of hydrogenated nanodiamonds.
“This is good news for those who study polarization of the cosmic microwave background, since the signal from spinning nanodiamonds would be weakly polarized at best,” said Brian Mason, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and coauthor on the paper.
Like any high-tech endeavor there were a few hiccups, and some folks had difficulty reaching the new website due to DNS propagation delays, old bookmarks, and… Guest essay by Eric Worrall Pope Francis has asked Oil Executives to a meeting, to come up with a plan to solve climate change and the world’s growing energy needs.
Way back in the Pleistocene (spring semester 1979) in Marine Science I, our professor, Robert… Guest essay by Eric Worrall h/t Willie Soon – anyone else worried about where this government funded programme could lead?
These inmates are learning about climate change It can help prisoners feel connected to something larger than themselves.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Fifa accused of greenwashing in World Cup carbon offset scheme

Fifa accused of greenwashing in World Cup carbon offset scheme

Football fans travelling to Russia are being encouraged to offset their emissions through a UN scheme that critics describe as fundamentally flawed Fifa is encouraging football fans to ‘offset’ the carbon emissions of flying to the World Cup starting this week in Russia.
For each ticket holder signing up to the initiative on its website, Fifa says it will offset 2.9 tonnes of carbon dioxide, the estimated emissions of an average ticket holder travelling to Russia from abroad.
This means fewer than 34,500 fans will be able to offset their travel tickets, compared with the hundreds of thousands of people expected to attend the event.
Fifa has not yet announced the list of offsetting projects but said they would be “verified low-carbon projects in Russia and abroad”.
It was denounced as “hot air” resulting in “fictitious emissions reductions” in a report led by the Environmental Defense Fund.
The UN offsetting mechanism to which Fifa has signed up has also been marred by controversy.
According to expert estimates commissioned by Fifa, this year’s World Cup is expected to generate more than 2.1 million tonnes of carbon dioxide – with nearly three quarters of emissions resulting from international flights to Russia and travel between host cities where the games are taking place.
“Since 2006, there have been projects put in place to measure and mitigate the environmental impact of those events, not only in relation to climate change but also in other areas relevant to sustainability, such as waste management, recycling, and green stadiums.” Welcoming Fifa’s collaboration with UN Climate Change, Patricia Espinosa, executive secretary of UN Climate Change said: “I commend Fifa for leading by example in reducing the climate impact of the 2018 World Cup and encouraging football fans to act on climate change.” At the same time as touting its climate credentials, Fifa is taking World Cup sponsorship from polluting companies including Gazprom, Qatar Airways and Kia Motors.
“First, these pledges are often used as greenwashing platforms.
He added: “The aim of the Carbon Neutral Now Pledge is to encourage companies and organisations, whatever their current level of emissions, to engage in action against climate change.” A longer version of this article first appeared on DeSmog UK

Climate Change & Global Warming

Activists channel Martin Luther King with new national climate campaign

Activists channel Martin Luther King with new national climate campaign

But the modern version has also opened up a new battleground – the environment.
The toxic water crisis in Flint, Michigan, as well as high-profile pipeline protests such as the one staged by the Standing Rock tribe in North Dakota, have also helped install the environment as a central plank in the Poor People’s Campaign.
Let’s use them to feed the world.
“Dominion in this sense means to care for, not destroy,” Barber said.
“You get white so-called evangelicals who say they are against abortion but say nothing about environmental devastation that is destroying lives and stunting children.
A pulp mill near his North Carolina home “filled the air with all sorts of smells and toxins”, Barber recalls.
But there is evidence King was cognizant of what was at stake, praising the beauty of the world and lamenting that “cities are gasping in polluted air and enduring contaminated water”.
We are made to live together because of the interrelated structure of reality.” Last year, Barber met with Pope Francis, who has perhaps now eclipsed Al Gore as the world’s most famous environmentalist.
Francis added that Christians who believe that God “invites us to subjugate the Earth” are mistaken.
“We are called upon to care for the Earth, not deplete it,” said the Rev Leo Woodberry, who spearheaded a campaign to halt a proposed wood pellet mill in the small North Carolina town of Hamlet, a majority black area already surrounded by a cluster of industrial plants.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Poor world calls on G7 to stick to climate agenda, despite Trump

Poor world calls on G7 to stick to climate agenda, despite Trump

With the US likely to be isolated when the G7 meets in Canada, poor countries reminded other leaders of their own climate responsibilities G7 leaders have been urged to ramp up climate finance to the developing world as they head to Charlevoix, Canada, for a two-day summit.
It is set to be a fraught meeting, as president Donald Trump threatens trade war with US allies and doubles down on his opposition to climate action.
He will meet six other leaders unwilling to compromise on their commitment to fight climate change.
Advance negotiators have failed to find common ground for the usual joint statement.
“Many developing countries desperately need this support in order to make their contribution to climate action.
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Gebru Jember Endalew, Ethiopian diplomat and chair of the least developed countries bloc at UN climate talks, agreed: “Finance is key to enabling an effective global response to climate change so that all countries have the tools to limit greenhouse gas emissions and protect their citizens from its impacts.” Marshall Islands president Hilda Heine said she would travel to Charlevoix to remind her fellow leaders “now is the time to step up your climate action.
But the rich world collectively pledged to the $100bn milestone.

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