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Wellness

Three Simple Stretches To Release Shoulder Tension

Three Simple Stretches To Release Shoulder Tension

Recently, I’ve been focusing on incorporating more connective tissue release and stretching practices into my own personal routine—and sharing it with others.
For shoulder tension, it’s important to focus on releasing both the front and the back muscles surrounding your shoulders.
the overuse of computers and cell phones.
One of my favorite shoulder releases is holding the ball up towards the front part of your armpit between your torso and arm.
Incorporating more active stretches will also help to provide the desired effects of creating longer more functional muscles.
You can use a counter top if you don’t have access to a barre.
As you breathe in, create length in your spine and as you exhale, see if you can rotate a little further.
Finding space through the chest area is equally important to shoulder health.
Additionally, you can turn your chin towards each shoulder to release the muscles on the sides of your neck.
Want to learn how to unlock the power of food to heal your body, prevent disease & achieve optimal health?

Climate Change & Global Warming

Renewable energy reduces power prices by more than cost of subsidies, study finds

Renewable energy reduces power prices by more than cost of subsidies, study finds

Renewable energy reduces power prices by more than cost of subsidies, study finds Posted Thu at 3:06pmThu 6 Dec 2018, 3:06pm Related Story: Renewables ‘heading for 80 per cent of electricity market by 2030’ Related Story: Labor to revive National Energy Guarantee ‘even if it’s not the best’ A landmark study has shown that renewable energy has reduced electricity prices by far more than the subsidies paid for it.
Key points: The study’s lead author said the research proved renewables were the key to lower power prices Researchers found South Australians were paying, on average, the highest electricity prices in the world Gas-fired power is pushing prices higher, while wind and solar are placing downward pressure on prices, the study found The independent study, by the Victoria Energy Policy Centre, focused on the South Australian electricity market and confirmed households in the state have on average the highest electricity prices in the world.
“We have an evidence base that puts this issue on the table for people to engage with.
It found that even though South Australians were paying the highest average bills in the world, wind and solar generation in South Australia actually brought wholesale prices down — and by far more than the subsidies paid for them.
It found that in the 2017–18 financial year, renewables reduced wholesale prices by an average of about 30 per cent, or about $37 per megawatt hour, mostly due to wind generation.
These cheap offers from renewable generators on the wholesale market displace more expensive offers from gas generators, effectively reducing prices for the entire market.
Infographic: But gas generation drives up prices But the study found the reduction in wholesale prices thanks to renewables has not been enough to offset the high price of gas.
“Certainly renewables have benefited the system, and we would have had higher prices in South Australia without renewables, fundamentally because of the high price of gas,” Mr Wood said.
Mr Wood agreed that South Australia’s current energy mix meant expensive gas generation was setting the price for the whole market.
From Phys Org November 26, 2018 by Christina Larson And Mauricio Savarese This May 8, 2018 photo released by the Brazilian Environmental and Renewable Natural Resources Institute (Ibama) shows an illegally deforested area on Pirititi indigenous lands as Ibama agents inspect Roraima state in Brazil’s Amazon basin.

Energy

Radical environmentalists are fighting climate change – so why are they persecuted?

Radical environmentalists are fighting climate change – so why are they persecuted?

Enter ‘radical’ greens I’ve had the pleasure of getting to know radical environmentalists from numerous groups throughout my doctoral research.
They blame such views, in addition to capitalism and endless economic growth, for the dire state of modern ecosystems.
Notable radical green groups include Earth First!, Extinction Rebellion, the Hambacher forest occupation, and Sea Shepherd.
The radical green movement was born in response to the perceived inability of these mainstream environmental organisations to curb ecological decline.
The resurgence of the ‘Green Scare’ Criminalising and repressing non-violent activists could fatally delay an effective response to climate change.
In the UK, anti-fracking activists were arrested recently after blocking a convoy delivering equipment to the Preston New Road fracking site in Lancashire.
The FBI classed radical environmental groups such as the Earth Liberation Front as the nation’s lead domestic terrorist threat, even though it never targeted living beings.
Lengthy prison sentences and fines befell “eco-terrorists” caught engaging in direct action deemed threatening to economic interests.
Occupying trees or blockading a road to a fracking site is clearly justified resistance during times of widespread injustice.
Radical responses – direct action and mass political mobilising – might be our only hope for building the better world that is still within our reach.

Conservation & Sustainability

Country diary: the cloven ash – a two-headed enigma

Country diary: the cloven ash – a two-headed enigma

The twin-trunked ash tree stands just out of the hedge on its medieval bank.
It catches the last rays of the sun tipping over Wenlock Edge, the western rise of Corve Dale.
The tree is a veteran, heading towards what the poet John Clare would call an “old, huge, ash-dotterel”.
It may have been a boundary marker, to do with smallholdings, quarries, lime kilns, charcoal burning, parish edges – a fixed point in a world turning in and out of its own past.
This is ash woodland country but there are many places connected with this kind of industry and settlement that are marked in some, as yet mysterious, way by big old ash – Æsc in Old English – open grown, cleared around so their individual character can be seen from a distance.
This tree’s point is divided, cloven: two huge trunks, like legs sticking out of the ground, rise to then drop cascades of rattley, stiff, black-budded branches; a split ash, perhaps stepped through to cure hernias, rickets, impotence; perhaps a shrew ash in which a shrew (at one time feared for cursing cattle) was walled up in a hole and the tree venerated; a two-headed tree, north and south, both facing west.
The way the sunset spotlights this particular tree, amongst the long shadowy miles of the dale, is uncanny.
This, its moment, is one to be acknowledged, in that offhand, secular, not-making-a-fuss reverence we have for trees when they become recognised as special in some way.
The strange and beautiful lighting illuminates what has been there donkey’s years, perhaps anonymously for most of them and noticed by very few now.
Country diary: a shadow of ash dieback over Derbyshire’s dales Read more The historical ecologist Oliver Rackham said old ash accumulate ecological and cultural value with age: “one 200-year-old ash can be a series of ecosystems for which 10,000 50-year-old ashes are no use at all”.

Alternative Energy

3 Key Dangers of Solar Geoengineering and Why Some Critics Urge a Global Ban

3 Key Dangers of Solar Geoengineering and Why Some Critics Urge a Global Ban

The basic idea behind SRM is to release particles into the earth’s stratosphere, the atmospheric layer approximately 6–30 miles above the surface, where they would then reflect some of the sun’s light (and heat) away from Earth, resulting in atmospheric cooling.
One such example is the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines, an event which released large amounts of sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere.
Despite this parallel, why is Climate Analytics warning against solar radiation management?
As Climate Analytics notes, solar radiation management “does not address the drivers of human-induced climate change.”
Pinatubo’s eruption showed, the basic concept behind the Harvard team’s proposal certainly has the potential to cool the planet, but Climate Analytics notes the many sizable and unique risks to attempting solar radiation management on a long-term, global scale.
Even David Keith, one of the Harvard scientists working on solar radiation management, shares the concern that this work could distract from the required efforts to reduce global carbon emissions.
But as Climate Analytics points out, there are plenty of known risks and concerns surrounding solar radiation management, including the following: Weather System Changes: According to the Climate Analytics briefing: “Solar radiation management would alter the global hydrological cycle,” which means changes to global weather patterns, including monsoon activity.
And changing the global climate and weather could also alter wind power potential.
This potential for geopolitical conflict is one reason Climate Analytics is calling for a global ban on solar radiation management.
The head of the American Petroleum Institute spelled out part of this solution at an industry conference in 1965 in which he said, “There is still time to save the world’s peoples from the catastrophic consequence of pollution, but time is running out.”

Organic Living

Be the Handmade Holiday Hero This Year: 5 Amazing DIY Christmas Gift Ideas

Be the Handmade Holiday Hero This Year: 5 Amazing DIY Christmas Gift Ideas

There is something particularly special about receiving a handmade holiday gift — something that someone put their heart into.
And if you have Mason jars and some ribbon, you have the packaging too!
Here are five DIY holiday gifts you can easily make with items you already have in your home.
and 1 cup sugar.
Transfer to a Mason jar and tie a ribbon around it and you have a lovely, handmade gift.
Coat the jar with adhesive and then roll it in the Epsom salt until the jar is coated.
When dry, insert a candle and you have a sparkling holiday gift!
You can either layer each item in the Mason jar or combine all of the ingredients and then top with the goodies.
Salt Dough Ornaments Handmade ornaments add a charming, personal touch to your loved ones’ Christmas trees.
To make salt dough ornaments, you’ll need: Combine the flour and salt, then stir in the water.

Oceans

The Deep-Sea Fish with the Telescopic Tubular Eyes

The Deep-Sea Fish with the Telescopic Tubular Eyes

In a unique family of fishes, only two species exist.
The longer Gigantura indica and the shorter, robust Gigantura chun, are the only known species for the family Giganturidae.
The family is rather aptly named the telescope fishes because of the forward-pointing, ‘‘telescopic’’ eyes with large lenses.
These eyes can be near 4% of the body length.
Both fish face upward orienting those big tubular eyes toward the surface.
Those eyes and orientation are thought to be an adaptation to seeing prey above silhouetted against the light coming down from the surface.
A recently published paper by Kupchik, Benfield, and Sutton provides two more videos from 2015 taken in the Gulf of Mexico of these unique fish.
In one of the videos, like the video from above, there is a pairing of fish.
In this case, the pairing as an adaption would allow both individuals to exchange genes.
In the extremes of the deep-sea novel adaption is a necessity.

Food & Water

Country diary: a grey heron waits patiently for its catch

Country diary: a grey heron waits patiently for its catch

Here it joins the River Parrett and surges to Bridgwater and the sea.
Out in Bridgwater Bay, wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) can smell the mud washed down by heavy autumn rain.
They wait in the lower reaches of the river until the water level rises enough to allow them to migrate upriver to spawn, seeking the same patch of gravel where they hatched years before.
The Tone is not like the popular idea of a salmon river.
There are no rocks, definitely no bears, and the water is opaque and flat, its calm surface spotted with small ovals of foam drifting mesmerically north-east.
Repairs to fish passes have helped more reach their spawning grounds above Taunton.
But they are still rare.
As I set out on the riverside path, I know it’s unlikely I’ll glimpse one.
It’s waiting for an arcing flash of muscle, that sideways wriggle of a leaping salmon swimming through the air.
After a while I turn back, leaving it to its vigil, sure in its certainty that the salmon will come.

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LATEST FROMConservation & Sustainability

Conservation & Sustainability

Country diary: the cloven ash – a two-headed enigma

Country diary: the cloven ash – a two-headed enigma

The twin-trunked ash tree stands just out of the hedge on its medieval bank.
It catches the last rays of the sun tipping over Wenlock Edge, the western rise of Corve Dale.
The tree is a veteran, heading towards what the poet John Clare would call an “old, huge, ash-dotterel”.
It may have been a boundary marker, to do with smallholdings, quarries, lime kilns, charcoal burning, parish edges – a fixed point in a world turning in and out of its own past.
This is ash woodland country but there are many places connected with this kind of industry and settlement that are marked in some, as yet mysterious, way by big old ash – Æsc in Old English – open grown, cleared around so their individual character can be seen from a distance.
This tree’s point is divided, cloven: two huge trunks, like legs sticking out of the ground, rise to then drop cascades of rattley, stiff, black-budded branches; a split ash, perhaps stepped through to cure hernias, rickets, impotence; perhaps a shrew ash in which a shrew (at one time feared for cursing cattle) was walled up in a hole and the tree venerated; a two-headed tree, north and south, both facing west.
The way the sunset spotlights this particular tree, amongst the long shadowy miles of the dale, is uncanny.
This, its moment, is one to be acknowledged, in that offhand, secular, not-making-a-fuss reverence we have for trees when they become recognised as special in some way.
The strange and beautiful lighting illuminates what has been there donkey’s years, perhaps anonymously for most of them and noticed by very few now.
Country diary: a shadow of ash dieback over Derbyshire’s dales Read more The historical ecologist Oliver Rackham said old ash accumulate ecological and cultural value with age: “one 200-year-old ash can be a series of ecosystems for which 10,000 50-year-old ashes are no use at all”.

Conservation & Sustainability

Another 2 billion people are coming to dinner. How do we feed them?

Another 2 billion people are coming to dinner. How do we feed them?

Future shock How do we feed the world’s growing population without wrecking the earth?
It’s a question that looks especially urgent given estimates that some 9.8 billion people will inhabit the planet by 2050, up from 7.6 billion now.
Without improving techniques and technology, feeding all of them would require putting an area twice the size of India under plow and pasture while emitting as much carbon as 13,000 coal plants running nonstop for a year, according to a report published on Wednesday by the World Resources Institute.
The Washington D.C.-based think tank has been working on this report for the last six years, looking for a solution to our existential triple challenge: feed everyone and shrink agricultural emissions to keep the world from heating more than 1.5 degrees Celsius, all without clearing more land for farming.
The WRI’s report lays out a way that everyone could get enough to eat in 2050, even as we turn farmland into forest and allow carbon-sucking trees to spread their leaves over an area larger than Australia.
By eating less meat, leveling off population growth, reducing waste, and phasing out biofuels, we could reduce the amount of additional food needed by half: But diminishing demand for meat by getting more people to go vegan just isn’t enough.
“We wanted to focus on things that were realistic and achievable.” If we also develop better seeds and animal breeds and use existing farm and pasture-land more intensively, we could shrink our agricultural footprint by 800 million hectares, an area bigger than Texas.
That’s important, because the world needs to cover at least one Texas with trees to keep temperatures below 1.5 degrees of warming.
Pulling all this off seems daunting, but the researchers divided the action needed into a 22-item “menu” with discrete recommendations like eating less beef and lamb, and breeding crops that can withstand higher temperatures.
The report says if those funds were diverted to programs that reduce food waste, squeeze more food from the ground, and study how to improve soil health, the world could solve this three-headed monster of a problem.

Conservation & Sustainability

War of Words

War of Words

And I really don’t want to fight with them.
In wartime, not taking sides is almost as bad as betrayal.
With a shared sense of national purpose, people made sacrifices for the common good.
This approach has worked in towns and cities where people are deeply concerned about climate change.
That may have been the point when we stopped talking politics with the extended family — or at least, when I did.
I wondered whether the act of picking an enemy — even an abstract one, like climate change — inevitably made enemies of other people.
They were simply handed a narrative toolkit that emphasized conflict, and voilà enemies appeared.
My point was that we had been pitted against one another by outside forces, and we really weren’t different from the supposed “enemy.” (My other point was that I didn’t like sports.)
As the journalist Amanda Ripley wrote, the key is not to avoid conflict, but to complicate it.
Others read a more nuanced version that focused on the complexity of the debate and considered several points of view.

Conservation & Sustainability

Endangered Dusky Gopher Frog Suffers Setback In Supreme Court Ruling

Endangered Dusky Gopher Frog Suffers Setback In Supreme Court Ruling

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday handed a victory to timber company Weyerhaeuser Co and other landowners seeking to limit the federal government’s power to designate private land as protected habitat for endangered species in a property rights case involving a warty amphibian called the dusky gopher frog.
Fish and Wildlife Service, finding the lower court gave the government too much leeway.
The justices sent the case back to the 5th Circuit lower to reconsider.
Roberts wrote that the appeals court’s broad definition of what can be defined as “critical habitat” under the Endangered Species Act was incorrect, with chief justice making clear that there are limits on the scope of government authority to make such determinations.
The chief justice also said the challengers should be allowed to contest whether the government conducted a rigorous analysis of the costs and benefits when designating the land as critical habitat.
The Supreme Court did not rule on whether land that needs modifications to support a protected species, like the property in question, can constitute habitat, meaning the ruling may be limited in its impact on other similar cases.
“It was good to have the unanimous court agree with Weyerhaeuser on both of its legal arguments,” added Weyerhaeuser’s lawyer, Timothy Bishop.
Conservative Justice Brett Kavanaugh did not participate in the case, which was argued before President Donald Trump’s nominee was confirmed by the Senate last month.
The agency’s critical habitat designation covered the tract of 1,544 acres (about 625 hectares) of private land in Louisiana as well as nearly 5,000 acres (about 2,025 hectares) in Mississippi.
The owners of the Louisiana land filed a legal challenge to the designation, saying it would infringe on their rights to use the property as they see fit.

Conservation & Sustainability

Forage Wild Nuts for Your Holiday Feast

Forage Wild Nuts for Your Holiday Feast

The grove on the Tongue Mountain Range was half that height, but it had been there a while.
Only mature shagbark hickory trees have shaggy bark, and these were laden with unripe nuts.
Shagbark hickory nuts are edible and sweet tasting.
Even though individual trees don’t produce annually, there’s always nuts in the forest each fall.
Wild pecans taste the same as cultivated ones but are smaller and easier to remove from the shell.
Forest foragers can find two types of wild walnuts, black and white.
Butternuts have a high oil content, which is nutritious but also causes them to spoil quickly.
The nut must come from native American beech trees (Fagus grandifolia), not European beech trees (Fagus sylvatica) which are also called “common beech.” American beechnuts are sweet.
European beechnuts are bitter like acorns.
Beechnuts spoil quickly, so either eat them or roast them shortly after harvesting them.

Conservation & Sustainability

Science returns to the House

Science returns to the House

This story was originally published by Mother Jones and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.
Former Texas Rep. Ralph Hall was chair for two years before Lamar Smith (R-Texas) took over in 2013.
Hall was like a warm-up for Smith’s reign, telling the National Journal in 2011,“I don’t think we can control what God controls” when it comes to climate and accusing scientists of manipulating their evidence.
Smith took his chairmanship to new lengths, using subpoena power against scientists in an attempt to uncover a smoking gun in what he referred to as the “extreme climate agenda.” The committee would have been in for major changes next year no matter what party controlled the House, because the 70-year-old Smith announced his plans to retire earlier this year.
There will be radical changes coming, according to Eddie Bernice Johnson, a Texas Democrat who is a ranking member of the committee and likely to become the next chair.
Johnson has already laid out her priorities for the future of the committee should she become chair.
Smith regularly called hearings to investigate a debunked “pause” in global warming, a myth manufactured by skeptics, and laid the rubric for the EPA’s radical science overhaul that would have effectively stripped scientific reports from being considered in rulemaking.
I wrote a year ago about how Smith and his committee had become a polarizing force in the scientific world: A change in House rules gave Smith new subpoena powers in 2015, unusual for the House science committee, and he has since issued 24 subpoenas, more than any other chair in the House during that time, with some going beyond the committee’s traditional jurisdiction over federal science research.
He helped to popularize the myth that global warming had paused, holding a hearing during which he demanded NOAA documents and redactions on its study refuting the idea.
Eighteen candidates with STEM backgrounds also won seats Tuesday, some of whom will bolster the House’s new ranks of science advocates.

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Climate Change & Global Warming

Renewable energy reduces power prices by more than cost of subsidies, study finds

Renewable energy reduces power prices by more than cost of subsidies, study finds

Renewable energy reduces power prices by more than cost of subsidies, study finds Posted Thu at 3:06pmThu 6 Dec 2018, 3:06pm Related Story: Renewables ‘heading for 80 per cent of electricity market by 2030’ Related Story: Labor to revive National Energy Guarantee ‘even if it’s not the best’ A landmark study has shown that renewable energy has reduced electricity prices by far more than the subsidies paid for it.
Key points: The study’s lead author said the research proved renewables were the key to lower power prices Researchers found South Australians were paying, on average, the highest electricity prices in the world Gas-fired power is pushing prices higher, while wind and solar are placing downward pressure on prices, the study found The independent study, by the Victoria Energy Policy Centre, focused on the South Australian electricity market and confirmed households in the state have on average the highest electricity prices in the world.
“We have an evidence base that puts this issue on the table for people to engage with.
It found that even though South Australians were paying the highest average bills in the world, wind and solar generation in South Australia actually brought wholesale prices down — and by far more than the subsidies paid for them.
It found that in the 2017–18 financial year, renewables reduced wholesale prices by an average of about 30 per cent, or about $37 per megawatt hour, mostly due to wind generation.
These cheap offers from renewable generators on the wholesale market displace more expensive offers from gas generators, effectively reducing prices for the entire market.
Infographic: But gas generation drives up prices But the study found the reduction in wholesale prices thanks to renewables has not been enough to offset the high price of gas.
“Certainly renewables have benefited the system, and we would have had higher prices in South Australia without renewables, fundamentally because of the high price of gas,” Mr Wood said.
Mr Wood agreed that South Australia’s current energy mix meant expensive gas generation was setting the price for the whole market.
From Phys Org November 26, 2018 by Christina Larson And Mauricio Savarese This May 8, 2018 photo released by the Brazilian Environmental and Renewable Natural Resources Institute (Ibama) shows an illegally deforested area on Pirititi indigenous lands as Ibama agents inspect Roraima state in Brazil’s Amazon basin.

Climate Change & Global Warming

The point of no return – inside the 7 December issue of The Guardian Weekly

The point of no return – inside the 7 December issue of The Guardian Weekly

Two months ago, the UN’s climate change panel warned that unless humanity takes drastic action, we will only have 12 years to save the planet from disaster.
Representatives from almost 200 nations are currently meeting in the Polish coal-mining town of Katowice to try to turn the pledges made in Paris in 2015 into a political reality.
There are, with children in Australia walking out of school to protest the climate inaction, signs of generational optimism.
On the other hand, we have Donald Trump dismissing his own government’s climate report, while the incoming Bolsonaro administration is refusing to host next year’s climate talks in Brazil.
There is still time to save the world but at the moment, Robin McKie writes, a climate catastrophe looks inevitable – and everywhere will be affected.
With the White House actively uninterested in the process in Poland, a key role will fall to Obama’s “climate diaspora” – a group of former state department climate officials now working in the private sector who are doing all they can to protect the goals agreed in Paris.
In a fascinating piece, Karl Mathiesen profiles the likes of Sue Biniaz and Todd Stern, who are trying to save the Paris accord from their own president.
As Emmanuel Macron sat with other G20 leaders in Buenos Aires, the group of tax protesters known as the gilets jaunes held a third weekend of demonstrations.
The violence in France brought the government to crisis point.
The battle with the “yellow vests” is the biggest challenge to Macron since he took office last May, writes our Paris correspondent Angelique Chrisafis.

Climate Change & Global Warming

The Paris Agreement rulebook explained

The Paris Agreement rulebook explained

Vastly more complex than the Paris Agreement itself are the set of rules that will make it work After three years of talking, delegates have arrived in Katowice, Poland, to make a deal on the so-called rulebook of the Paris Agreement.
Why are they still negotiating?
These include guidelines on how to articulate and track national climate pledges or, in UN jargon, nationally determined contributions or NDCs; how to meet a national target by helping other countries to reduce their emissions, or how to communicate national efforts to adapt to climate change.
Also on the table will be rules on how to report on finance for climate action and equip developing countries with technology to combat climate change.
Finally, there’s already a copious section dedicated to making the reporting actions more transparent and defining reviewing procedures, such as the global stocktake or the compliance committee.
Country A, for example, may give economy-wide targets for cutting carbon, while others will focus on bringing down emissions per sector.
This will help to make the implementation of the Paris agreement more transparent over time, and foster countries’ trust in each other’s efforts.
In return for greater accountability, developing countries will be expecting financial help from rich countries.
Many of the debates over the rulebook will focus on how climate action is reviewed.
Are the rules going to be the same for every country?

Climate Change & Global Warming

Extreme heat increasing in both summer and winter

Extreme heat increasing in both summer and winter

WASHINGTON, DC –A new study shows extreme heat events both in the summer and in the winter are increasing across the U.S. and Canada, while extreme cold events in summer and winter are declining.
A new study in the in Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, a publication of the American Geophysical Union, examined absolute extreme temperatures–high temperatures in summer and low temperatures in winter–but also looked at relative extreme temperature events–unusually cold temperatures and unusually warm temperatures throughout the year.
The new study found both relative and absolute extreme heat events have increased across the US and Canada since 1980.
The new research also found both relative and absolute extreme cold events are decreasing, most notably in Alaska and Northern Canada, along with patches along the US Atlantic coast.
The new study is one of the first to explore relative extreme temperature events, which are changing more rapidly than absolute temperature extremes, and can have important implications for the environment, agriculture and human health, according to Scott Sheridan, professor in the department of geography at Kent State University and lead author of the new study.
But we’ve also seen that extreme temperatures that are really anomalous for the time of year can have a high impact–these relative extremes are important and underappreciated,” he said.
In the eastern half of the US, relative extreme heat events occur as early as mid-winter into early spring.
The 2018 bill ditches the concept of “revenue neutrality”, an attempt to protect poor people from the impact of energy price hikes.
Guest essay by Albert Parker A recent paper Trajectories of the Earth System in the Anthropocene (Ref.
Proposition 127, a renewable energy initiative in Arizona, lost handily Tuesday, according to ABC Arizona, citing The Associated Press.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Bolsonaro’s deforestation of the Amazon has already begun

Bolsonaro’s deforestation of the Amazon has already begun

Loss of forest cover jumped almost 50% during the election campaign, in anticipation of looser environmental regulations Deforestation in Brazil’s Amazon jumped almost 50% during the three month electoral season that brought Jair Bolsonaro to power, according to preliminary official figures.
Deforestation usually increases in Brazil’s electoral years, amid promises from local politicians they will open up protected land or make environmental legislation more flexible if elected.
As a result Bolsonaro, collected landslide victories in Amazon regions with higher deforestation rates.
There were three attacks against federal agents during the campaign.
The most serious one took place on October 19 in Pará state.
The new figures on forest loss come from Deter B, a satellite monitoring system developed by Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research (Inpe) in order to monitor deforestation in almost real time for surveillance purposes.
The data is publicly available and the calculation of the rate over the electoral season was made by Inpe at Climate Home News’ request.
But, he said the almost 48.8% difference with last year indicated the deforestation rate was unmistakably higher.
The 2018 deforestation rate is expected to be published in the next weeks and will most likely show a small increase from 2017.
You can read some of the great reporting Fabiano has already done for us here.

Climate Change & Global Warming

Terrifying New African Ebola Outbreak – Yet Politicians Still Witter On about “Climate Threats”

Terrifying New African Ebola Outbreak – Yet Politicians Still Witter On about “Climate Threats”

In all previous outbreaks, most of which took place in remote areas, the disease was contained before it spread widely.
… Read more (paywalled): https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2018/11/05/cdc-director-warns-that-congos-ebola-outbreak-may-not-be-containable/ As far as I can tell, and I’m not an expert, Ebola currently has three of the four traits it requires to become a global threat.
People who survive the lethal infection sometimes become symptomless carriers, shedding large numbers of virus particles for months, even years after their own personal encounter with Ebola.
Ebola is NOT YET airborne – although there are concerns from time to time that Ebola is marginally airborne in humans, at least via aerosol transmission, this assertion is vigorously denied by health authorities.
There are concerns that Ebola could mutate into an airborne strain, if an outbreak remains active for long enough in human populations.
However, Chiappelli et al. [33] stated that there is a distinct possibility for EBOV to become airborne because of the customary and high mutation rates of negative sense RNA viruses.
Besides, none of the 23 viruses that cause serious disease in humans have been known to mutate in a way that changed their mode of infection … Read more: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4885103/ Obviously there is every chance the latest outbreak will fizzle like all the previous outbreaks.
At any moment, an unknowing Ebola carrier, the sole survivor of an outbreak which killed their family and friends, a carrier with no visible signs of illness, might decide to build a new life in another country.
My recent paper presented a simple heuristic approach to climate science which plausibly proposed that a Millennial Turning Point (MTP)… Guest essay by Eric Worrall Multi-billionaire Bill Gates is apparently OK with the idea of his domestic energy bills rising a little, if Washington State votes to approve a new carbon tax.
[1] below) claims that even if the CO2 emission reductions called for in the Paris Agreement are met, our Earth may still enter what they call “Hothouse Earth” conditions, a long-term stabilization… Despite climate alarmists saying deaths and damages from hurricanes are getting worse, the fact of the matter is that both are in decline.

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